Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Cooking with Dorie Greenspan's "Around my French Table"

Cookbook French

  • Please log in to reply
195 replies to this topic

#31 Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 13 September 2010 - 06:37 PM

Chris, I was on a train when I saw your question about poaching the veal and for reasons unknown, I got a 'can't reply' message. But clearly you didn't need me. The color is amazing, isn't it? I was just as surprised the first time I made it.

If you make it again, you can go lighter on the tarragon. It's not a wallflower herb and 1/4 cup (by volume or weight) is not an insignificant amount.

Your brioche is gorgeous -- I didn't miss the egg wash at all when I looked at it.

Eldereno - congratulations on losing so much weight! I think that if you look through the book, you'll find many recipes that will fit into a diet. But you put your finger on it when you mentioned portion size. The French are very careful about portion size -- I read somewhere that, on average, French portions are one-third the size of American portions! -- so maybe you just need to cook from the book and say you're on a French diet :- )

#32 LindaK

LindaK
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,890 posts
  • Location:Boston, MA

Posted 14 September 2010 - 07:36 PM

My copy arrived today and I'm really pleased. The book has a good array of classics, classics with a twist, and innovative recipes that you won't generally find in French cookbooks. Great photos, too.

I'd expected to steer clear of the classics for now--been there, done that, so I thought. But the recipe that has me most excited is that for the Red Kuri Soup. If I'm lucky enough to be in France during fall or winter, potimarron soup is one of my favorites and I order it whenever I see it on a menu. I make butternut squash soup, but it isn't at all the same. The red kuris have just started to appear at my local farmers market. I'm not quite ready to give up the last tomatoes and green beans of the season, but when I do, this classic will be the first thing I make.

What is with the recipes with corn? Are French markets carrying fresh corn these days? Sacre bleu!


 


#33 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,124 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 15 September 2010 - 04:07 PM

Fresh Orange Pork Tenderloin (p. 273)
Go-With-Everything Celery Root Puree (p. 354)

This could hardly have been simpler or more delicious. I was a little unclear on what shape my pieces of pork tenderloin were supposed to wind up (cutting a small tenderloin into four pieces along its axis yielded roughly cube-shaped pieces of pork). The pork is seared over high heat, then the pan deglazed with orange juice. Onions, orange zest, and cardamom are added, a lid is put on, and the dish is gently simmered for ten minutes. It's finished with a few supremes of orange, and served over a bed of celery root puree (which was also excellent). The whole process takes around half hour, so this is a great weeknight meal option.

Fresh Orange Pork Tenderloin.jpg

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#34 Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:44 AM

LindaK -- I'm in Connecticut and haven't seen Red Kuri yet, but today it's certainly cool enough to want to have Beatrice's potimarron (or Red Kuri) soup. I hope you get to make it soon.

Chris -- as always, your food looks beautiful. The combination of fresh oranges and cardamom for a French pork dish is not usual, but I love the brightness of it. I'm glad you liked it, too.

#35 LindaK

LindaK
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,890 posts
  • Location:Boston, MA

Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:45 AM

Béatrix's Red Kuri Soup, p, 78

I told myself that I'd wait until fall to make this soup, but yesterday was cold, damp, and dreary. And I had picked up a red kuri squash from the farmers market a couple of days before. So, reader, I had to.


DSCF0265.JPG


Delicious! This is one of my favorite soups and this recipe did not disappoint. It was perfect as is, though I will admit that, being accustomed to restaurant and bistro versions that must use cream to add richness, I added a liitle more milk and a couple of tablespoons of butter (no cream in the house) to the full recipe. But it's hardly necessary. I topped each serving with a bit of creme fraiche and some croutons, as is traditional, and served it with a salad of arugula and the last of my garden tomatoes, and of course some bread and wine.

This soup has to be one of the easiest recipes I've made in a long time. Get this: you don't have to peel a kuri squash, despite it being a hard squash. Once you cut out the seeds, you cube it, simmer it, and puree it, skin and all. I would never have guessed. Thanks for the conseil, Dorie!


 


#36 Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:48 AM

LindaK -- our messages must have crossed in the ether! I am so, so happy that you made the soup and that it was just what you wanted. And so, so jealous too -- I'd love to have a bowl of it now. And I wouldn't mind some of that gorgeous tomato salad that's peeking out from behind. It would make Beatrix so happy to see her soup being made in America --- I'm going to send her the link now.

#37 LindaK

LindaK
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,890 posts
  • Location:Boston, MA

Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:52 AM

Dorie, the only thing wrong with that soup is that it made me "homesick" for Paris and the little restaurants that serve it. I've tried to replicate it over the years with various squash and pumpkins, to no avail--I didn't know it was a red kuri. Merci mille fois, Béatrix.


 


#38 Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:56 AM

Liinda, I didn't know it was red kuri either. I had made the soup and other dishes with potimarron over the years in Paris and then, one day, I returned to Connecticut and saw a squash that I'd used for decoration and the lightbulb went off. That squash was a red kuri and it was exactly the same as potimarron. I was thrilled!

#39 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,124 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 18 September 2010 - 11:17 AM

Linda, that looks fantastic. It may be 85°F here today, but to hell with it, I'm making soup for lunch...

Celery-Celery Soup (pp. 65)

This is another easier-than-pie pureed soup: you basically just simmer the vegetables in chicken stock until cooked (under a half hour), puree, and serve. The sweetness of the apple and celery root were nice, and I really liked the addition of the curried croutons (I made mine with the leftover brioche from last weekend) as suggested in the "bonne idées" sidebar. And yeah, I put on a LOT of croutons, I love the things. I really love celery, and wouldn't change a thing in this recipe: if it's cool where you live (and if you like celery... I know some don't) I strongly recommend making this soup.

Celery-Celery Soup.jpg

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#40 AAQuesada

AAQuesada
  • participating member
  • 295 posts

Posted 18 September 2010 - 02:07 PM

Aleppo is a decent sub for Espelette, often easier to find and less expensive. Although I do love Pd'E, it's med spicy and pretty aromatic, it's usually ground just a little coarser than most chile powders as well.

#41 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,124 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 19 September 2010 - 04:35 PM

Hachis Parmentier (pp. 258–259)

I meant to serve this last night, but neglected to survey my potato situation beforehand. Fortunately the recipe mentions a couple good stopping points, so I simmered the beef yesterday and then finished it today. I used Mexican Chorizo (the only sausage in the house at the moment), which I suspect is not exactly traditional here. And I used beef stock rather than bouillon. So, I guess this is more like "Inspired by Dorie" rather than actually the exact recipe in the book. Nevertheless, it's hard to go wrong with tender beef and good sausage topped with mashed potatoes and gruyere. This recipe was a bit more involved than some of the others in this chapter, but its still great for a fall weekend, and not difficult: just a bit more time-consuming.

Hachis Parmentier Whole.jpg

Hachis Parmentier Sliced.jpg

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#42 artisan02

artisan02
  • participating member
  • 231 posts
  • Location:Albuquerque, NM

Posted 19 September 2010 - 04:42 PM

Oh, that looks so good! I am waiting to get my copy!

#43 eldereno

eldereno
  • society donor
  • 291 posts
  • Location:Fredericksburg, VA

Posted 19 September 2010 - 05:03 PM

Made the Pumpkin and Blue Cheese Flan as part of brunch for myself and family this morning. Loved that it was easy, pretty low in carbs and very much appreciated by all those who ate it. My first, but not last, recipe from this beautiful cookbook!007.JPG

edited to add how easy this recipe is!

Edited by eldereno, 19 September 2010 - 05:08 PM.

Donna

#44 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,124 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 19 September 2010 - 05:05 PM

eldereno, that flan is definitely on my short list, it looks and sounds fantastic!

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#45 Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 19 September 2010 - 05:27 PM

Both the Hachis Parmentier and the Pumpkin-Gorgonzola Flans look terrific. It's funny, I was in Washington, DC last week taping a segment for NPR/All Things Considered and we made the Hachis Parmentier in host Michele Norris's kitchen. And then, last night, I was debating between the flans and coddled eggs and the eggs won. Great minds, etc...

#46 LindaK

LindaK
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,890 posts
  • Location:Boston, MA

Posted 19 September 2010 - 05:45 PM

Buckwheat Blini with Smoked Salmon and Crème Fraiche, p 172.


My offering for a potluck brunch today was batch of Dorie’s blini with smoked salmon. Very easy and the buckwheat flavor was delicious and a nice change of pace with the salmon. I didn’t fuss much with them, just crème fraiche, capers, and chives. But I can easily see dressing them up for a party.

Here’s a tray of them before they were whisked off to their demise.


blini.JPG


The one tricky part is making them uniformly round. As you can see, I didn’t really succeed. Anyone have any tips there?


 


#47 Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 19 September 2010 - 05:57 PM

Linda, I'm not a perfectly-round kind of cook, but if you really wanted to fuss over the blini, you could make sure that you were using the same amount for each little pancake and you could even use rings to keep them in shape. The other, easier way, is to use a blini pan. but, I think yours look tempting just the way they are. I'm so glad you and your friends enjoyed them!

#48 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,312 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 20 September 2010 - 09:17 AM

I would probably use muffin rings or blini pans also - but my muffing rings are larger than the size I prefer for blini.
Truly, I don't think anyone is going to notice that some of the blini are not perfectly round. The results shown in your photo are lovely and look extremely appetizing.

I prepared the Salted Butter Break-Ups yesterday and my results were beyond my expectations.
I did use the sel gris. Lord knows I have plenty of salt in my "collection" and the only problem was deciding which one to use - some have larger crystals than others - I chose a medium size.

I have to confess that I cheated with crosshatching the top. I just used one of my cooling racks to press into the top.
I also tried an experiment/addition - I scattered a few flakes of Cyprus black sea salt over the top just before it went into the oven.
The flaky crystals retained their shape and added just a tiny brittle crunch to the cookie. I really don't know what came over me. Ordinarily the first time I prepare a recipe I don't change a thing. Must have been my alter ego in control for that moment. I hope Dorie is not offended by my "tweak" of this lovely cookie.

I would have taken a photo but although I have my camera, the memory card is absent as I took a lot of photos at a birthday party for the child of one of my neighbors on Saturday and left the card with her to transfer the pics to her computer.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#49 Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 20 September 2010 - 09:29 AM

Andiesenji -- whatever came over you, it was a good thing -- I bet the cookies were gorgeous with a sprinkle of black salt.

#50 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,124 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 20 September 2010 - 05:22 PM

I made that veal marengo again for dinner tonight, though out of necessity I changed the garnishes: instead of potatoes I served it over egg noodles, and instead of onions I made brussels sprouts. I also cooked the mushrooms using the "wet and crowded" technique from Cooking Issues rather than the more conventional technique in the book. All of this worked quite well, in particular the mushrooms. If you aren't familiar with that technique, you can check it out here. It's as easy as can be, and really results in wonderful mushrooms.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#51 LindaK

LindaK
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,890 posts
  • Location:Boston, MA

Posted 22 September 2010 - 06:48 PM

Tzatziki, p, 24
Basque Potato Tortilla, p. 142

This post doesn’t have much “wow” factor, but is a testament to how one can pull together a quick, light, tasty meal when you get home late, have an empty fridge, but still want something home cooked that isn't pasta. This was last night.

The tzatziki is something I make often during summer. Super quick to prep, but it needs a little time for the salt to pull moisture from the cucumbers. In the meantime, you can make the tortilla.

Dorie’s recipe for tzatziki is identical to mine, so this more of an endorsement of her recipe. I really like the fresh herbs, especially the mint, that she specifies. Served with pita chips and a glass of wine, it’s a great appetizer. For those times when I want a more substantial version, I crumble some feta into the mixture—yum.


DSCF0301.JPG


The tortilla is simple to put together. Usually I use boiled potatoes, but this time tried Dorie’s method of sautéing cubed potatoes with the onion. It saved me some time and the browned potatoes added good flavor and texture to the final tortilla. The one you see here is a mini version of Dorie’s, I only had 6 eggs so used fewer potatoes and a smaller pan.

DSCF0305.JPG


Voila! Home at 9:30 pm, dinner ready by 10.


DSCF0316-1.JPG


 


#52 Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 22 September 2010 - 07:02 PM

Linda, I know you said the post didn't have much wow factor, but I don't agree: Home at 9:30; a good dinner at 10:00 -- that seems pretty wow to me!

#53 kalypso

kalypso
  • participating member
  • 721 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 22 September 2010 - 07:51 PM

Linda, I know you said the post didn't have much wow factor, but I don't agree: Home at 9:30; a good dinner at 10:00 -- that seems pretty wow to me!


Me too. I think your dinner looks great and the fact you had it on the table in 30 minutes is impressive

#54 MikeHartnett

MikeHartnett
  • participating member
  • 672 posts
  • Location:New Orleans

Posted 25 September 2010 - 05:55 PM

Made the endives with grapes and apples tonight. Unfortunately, no photo, but it was beyond delicious. You really can't understand without making it.

#55 JBN

JBN
  • participating member
  • 29 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 26 September 2010 - 06:55 AM

Returned home after being away most of September to find this book waiting for me and to discover that the local farmer's market still had glorious corn, tomatoes, and basil and the the fisherman hadn't sold out of his great scallops. Making the Warm Scallop Salad with Corn, Nectarines, and Basil was like an end-of-summer celebration. I was a bit hesitant about the raw corn at first. I shouldn't have been. What a great introduction to the book.

Attached Images

  • Warm Scallop Salad (for posting).jpg


#56 Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 26 September 2010 - 07:01 AM

Mike and JBN, I'm so glad to see you cooking from my cook.

Mike, you said exactly what I feel about the Endives, Apples and Grapes -- you have to make it. I'm in love with that dish.

JBN, I'm in chilly Kingston,Ontario today on the first chunk of my book tour, so seeing your corn and tomatoes made me a bit wistful. They won't be in my market when I get back, but I'm glad they were in yours.

#57 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,124 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 26 September 2010 - 04:21 PM

Chicken, Apples, and Cream à la Normande (pp. 218–219)

Another very simple sauteed chicken dish, this time with apples, onions, and mushrooms, finished with Calvados and cream. I personally would have preferred the apples cut a bit smaller (the recipe calls for 1" chunks), but otherwise the dish was quite successful.

Chicken, Apples, and Cream a la Normande.jpg

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#58 Dorie Greenspan

Dorie Greenspan
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 26 September 2010 - 04:30 PM

Chris, once again your food looks beautiful. Of course, you can cut the apples smaller, if you'd like, and I'm sure small pieces would look nice witht the mushrooms and onions. I kept them a bit chunkier so that they would hold their texture a little better, but in a dish like this, it would be fine to have smaller, softer apple pieces.

#59 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,124 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 27 September 2010 - 05:25 PM

Quiche Maraîchère (p. 158)

This was unlike any quiche I have ever had: it is probably 90% vegetables by weight, with only the tiniest amount of custard holding it together. To give you some sense of proportion, here is the unbaked quiche without the custard:

Quiche Maraîchère Filling.jpg

So yeah: a LOT of vegetables. Here it is baked, fresh out of the oven:

Quiche Maraîchère Baked.jpg

And served an hour later, cooled to lukewarm:

Quiche Maraîchère Served.jpg

Wow. Fantastic. I mean, you have to love vegetables to love this quiche. But if you do, cancel dinner tomorrow and put this on the menu, it was fabulous. I made Dorie's crust from the back of the book and found it tasty, but more finicky than my usual quiche crust: I think you could probably use whatever butter-based crust recipe you are used to working with. Or maybe lard, which would probably also be good.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#60 Becca Porter

Becca Porter
  • participating member
  • 275 posts
  • Location:Northeastern Louisiana

Posted 27 September 2010 - 05:26 PM

IMG_0476.JPG

This is my son's plate of food including the Hurry Up and Wait Roast Chicken. I am set to go to the grocery store tomorrow and I was nearly out of food to cook. I had a frozen organic chicken though so I was able to make this very simple recipe. I have made some very complicated roast chickens (hello Zuni) and I really didn't think this would be that impressive.

It was dead easy. I put some fingerling potatoes and onion wedges in the bottom of my roasting pan. While the chicken was resting tail in the air, I made a pan sauce with the drippings. I served it with roasted carrots and a salad.

Dang. That pan sauce was beyond flavorful, even though I only used water. The chicken was moist and the combo was superb. I loved having the potatoes and onion with the sauce as well. I will be making this again, frequently!
-Becca
www.porterhouse.typepad.com





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Cookbook, French