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Using marinated artichoke hearts


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20 replies to this topic

#1 SpaghettiWestern

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 01:42 PM

I was given a BIG jar of these and while i have eaten them before..... i was wondering what might be a tasty alternative to just using them as antipasto.

what do you like to do with them? i tried putting some with pasta and it didnt work too well....maybe i am not doing it right.
i am not at all a good cook. LOL

any suggestions please? thanks

#2 Darienne

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 01:53 PM

I might chop a few up and add them to the evening salad.
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#3 heidih

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 02:02 PM

Are they marinated in oil or in a vinegary brine?

#4 SpaghettiWestern

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 03:42 PM

Are they marinated in oil or in a vinegary brine?



they are in oil and vinegar.... not alot of vinegar. i wish i could figure out how to eat them with pasta but not being a cook.... i am just not sure what to put in with them to make it taste good. just the chokes by themselves with pasta is not good enough.
any ideas for a sauce ?
thanks

#5 Lisa Shock

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 03:49 PM

I'd add them to pasta salad made with a vinaigrette dressing.

I also enjoy them on 'salad sandwiches' that I make from lettuce and veggies on toast that I put a little mustard on and drizzle with a little vinaigrette dressing.

I make pizza at home a lot, and they can be good in small number, well drained, on a pizza.

#6 LaurieB

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 04:07 PM

This is a heavenly summer picnic sandwich. Drain the artichokes, then slice lengthwise. Slice a baguette. Spread it with pesto mayo and layer with: roasted red and/or yellow peppers; thinly sliced provolone and thinly sliced medallions of fresh mozzarella.

#7 Darienne

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 04:14 PM

Was just checking around for some pasta salads...hesitating to ask Chef Lisa Shock outright for one of hers...never have found a pasta salad that I liked...and found this one which features both pasta and artichoke hearts from Miz Ducky

Edited by Darienne, 01 May 2010 - 04:14 PM.

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#8 Jmahl

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 04:23 PM

I once asked an expert who imports caviar into the U.S. on what is the right way to eat caviar. He said just shovel as much as you can into your mouth and enjoy. I think the same applies here.
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#9 Darienne

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 04:42 PM

I once asked an expert who imports caviar into the U.S. on what is the right way to eat caviar. He said just shovel as much as you can into your mouth and enjoy. I think the same applies here.

I love that.

Actually I just remembered that my friend Tobe always puts Hot Italian sausages or Chorizo and artichoke hearts into her Impossible Pie along with Asiago cheese and numberless other ingredients.
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#10 blue_dolphin

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 06:30 PM

This is hardly haute cuisine (more like a Campbell's soup casserole) but there's a recipe in the Enchanted Broccoli Forest cookbook for Pasta with Marinated Artichoke Hearts that I adapt from time to time. It's handy when I'm asked to make dinner in an unfamiliar kitchen because it's easy to grab all the ingredients in any supermarket.

Not sure how it would work with a BIG jar of artichokes because you start by draining the liquid into a skillet and then gently saute a pile of thinly sliced onions in the drained-off marinade, which provides most of the seasoning. I believe the recipe adds a bit of extra olive oil and butter; sometimes I do, sometimes I don't. I usually add some sliced mushrooms, something green (like zucchini or asparagus), some red bell pepper and a pinch of cayenne. Meanwhile, cut up the artichokes and add them to the pan when the veggies are about cooked. Once all that's warmed through, remove the pan from the heat and stir in some sour cream and your cooked, drained pasta. Sprinkle with a bit of parmesan.

Sometimes I add shrimp or scallops. Or bacon. I suspect leftover chicken would work, too.

#11 SpaghettiWestern

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Posted 01 May 2010 - 06:41 PM

wow! thanks for the replies. i like all of your suggestions. i will try them all.
thanks again for your input.

#12 crinoidgirl

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 12:24 PM

I like them in red sauce with shrimp over pasta, preferably linguini.
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#13 Lisa Shock

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 07:26 PM

My thoughts are that pasta salad should be at least 50% salad ingredients. I like to have hearty amounts of sliced carrot (ok, I use a Japanese flower cutter to make flower shaped slices), celery, raw zucchini, red bell pepper, slivers of red onion, a few beans (garbanzo or cannelloni), and maybe cucumber. Then, I add preserved ingredients like olives and marinated artichokes and the vinaigrette. And, I serve it on a bed of greens with tomatoes and other, more delicate veggies and raw basil. (and assorted things from my garden) So, it can count as a meal.

#14 SpaghettiWestern

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Posted 02 May 2010 - 10:49 PM

I like them in red sauce with shrimp over pasta, preferably linguini.



you know? i tried that and it didnt come out at all. tell me how you did yours. it sounded like it would be good. i must not be cooking it right

#15 haresfur

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 03:45 AM

Pasta ala Costco - Take a couple of big spoons full of stuff out of the huge jars of artichoke hearts, olives, sun dried tomatoes, marinated roasted peppers, bean salad, whatever in the fridge and toss them with pasta and lots of freshly grated Parmesan. Maybe add some cured meat of your choice.

Aka "Disappearing Pasta" - I put antipasti on my pasta and it vanished. :raz:
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#16 Special K

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 07:55 AM

I use them in a jazzed-up version of The Frugal Gourmet's spinach artichoke casserole: A layer of the artichoke hearts, a layer of thawed frozen spinach, squeezed as dry as possible, a layer of cooked ground sausage (my addition to placate hubby), and a layer of cream cheese/garlic & herb boursin, all topped with grated Parm. This is comfort food around here. It substitutes for green bean casserole on holidays.

#17 OliverB

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 10:28 AM

I would drain some, cut them in half and fry them until browned, makes a great side dish with beef etc. I have not done that with marinated ones, but don't see why that would not work.
As for pasta, maybe take a couple and throw them in the blender or food processor and then create a sauce with that, add a couple whole ones on top?
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#18 Rico

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 10:50 AM

I like to remove the choke and then stuff it with a mixture of parmesan, ricotta, mozzarella, and whatever herbs and spices, a la Vefa's Kitchen. Then bake it at 350F until, well, it's ready. It's good stuff (pun intended, sadly).

#19 Lapin d'Argent

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 04:33 PM

I bet they'd be a great addition to Spaghetti Carbonara.

They also make a wonderful pizza topping, especially combined with roasted peppers, goat cheese, and rosemary. One of our favorite, quick winter mainstays.

#20 emilyr

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 07:52 AM

I get requests for this dip all the time. It's kind of '50s housewife-y, but it's really great at parties. I even got a request for it for a friend's wedding and had to figure out how to make two hotel pans' worth!

It's just cream cheese, mayo and Asiago cheese in a 2:1:1 ratio, chopped green onions, and drained and chopped chokes. I usually add a few grates of nutmeg and either cayenne or white pepper for just a bit of heat. Mix these together, and then bake til bubbly; add a bit of grated Asiago on top and pop under the broiler til it's just brown. I serve it with veggies (especially cauliflower!!) and some jalapeno cheddar beer bread toasts (another crowd pleaser).

When I'm not party hopping ( :laugh: ) I really like marinated artichokes in grilled sandwiches, especially jazzing up boring lunch meats like turkey. And they're good with hard cheeses like Parmesan, Asiago, and Romano. I always add them to pasta puttanesca, too. If all else fails, and you run out of ideas, you can just send them to me!
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#21 Kouign Aman

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Posted 04 May 2010 - 03:46 PM

Our version of the ever-popular hot dip is
1:1:1 mayo:grated parmesan:chopped artichoke hearts (marinated or not)
season w tobasco or cayenne to taste
bake at 350 til bubbly, serve with crusty bread.

(I've used this as a pasta topping too, its not brilliant, but it is good).
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