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Report: eG Chocolate and Confectionery Conference 2010

Confections Report Chocolate

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99 replies to this topic

#91 beacheschef

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 01:56 PM

Beth:
I would love to get some chocolate transfer sheets with you. I think the only ones I currently have are decorated with small gold stars. My only concern is that shipping them might melt or smear the cocoa butter.

Let me know if you decide to buy them and what their policy is about shipping in warm weather.

Glad to hear that Milo was doing better - keep us posted!
Beaches Pastry
May your celebrations be sweet!
Beaches Pastry Blog

#92 Marmish

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 02:01 PM

Beth:
I would love to get some chocolate transfer sheets with you. I think the only ones I currently have are decorated with small gold stars. My only concern is that shipping them might melt or smear the cocoa butter.

Let me know if you decide to buy them and what their policy is about shipping in warm weather.

Glad to hear that Milo was doing better - keep us posted!


Thanks, Mary. Milo is hanging in there. I'll try to get something together soon for the transfers before it gets too warm and see what the vendor recommends. It's still cool here in the Windy City.

#93 beacheschef

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Posted 26 April 2010 - 02:10 PM

Steve:
Many thanks for the hours of effort it took to host our "Weekend of Chocolate". I had a fabulous time, and learned a lot of tips and techniques.

I was interested in playing with the flavored extracts and oils - learning how much (or how little) to add to ganache. In many instances, it was "flavor by taste", where we kept sampling the ganache until we thought it was "right".

The talk on ganache ratios and sugar substitution was an "a-ha" moment - especially when you had to explain it to me a second time... I can now adapt current formulas to make them more shelf stable.

I'm surprised that after all these years, you taught me to scrape my chocolate mold in a perpendicular manner. So simple and easy, a far better technique than I was using.

I'll post the Mojito ganache soon - I made it last week using lime zest, fresh lime juice and spearamint extract. I like it even better - it has more flavor.

Thanks everyone for a great weekend, lots of laughs, and knowing I'm not alone in this business. (just alone in my hometown!)
Beaches Pastry
May your celebrations be sweet!
Beaches Pastry Blog

#94 cmflick

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 05:40 AM

I'm surprised that after all these years, you taught me to scrape my chocolate mold in a perpendicular manner. So simple and easy, a far better technique than I was using.



Can you explain scraping your chocolate mold in a perpendicular manner? I'm not sure what you're doing.

#95 lebowits

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 08:25 AM




I'm surprised that after all these years, you taught me to scrape my chocolate mold in a perpendicular manner. So simple and easy, a far better technique than I was using.



Can you explain scraping your chocolate mold in a perpendicular manner? I'm not sure what you're doing.


What beacheschef refers to is the angle of the blade being drawn across the mold. I initially used a "sharp" angle of attack across the top of the mold when scraping the excess chocolate. I was subsequently taught during a class with JP Wybauw to hold the blade at a 90 degree angle to the mold itself. This results in a very clean draw with minimal to no "pull" of the chocolate on either side of the cavity openings.

I'm sure there is some explanation relating to the surface tension of the chocolate vs the angle of the blade but I couldn't tell you what that might be.
Steve Lebowitz
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Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

#96 Chris Hennes

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 08:48 AM

Putting on my "Manager" hat for a moment: let's wrap up the reporting on the Conference itself by Friday, April 30, then take the discussions to more specific topics (so that a search will find them later). If you have more photos to post, now's the time to do it. Thanks!

Chris Hennes
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#97 Kerry Beal

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Posted 28 April 2010 - 03:29 PM

Eric played around with a disposable hemisphere mold that had a cocoa butter transfer already on it. It turned out to be too flexible to use normal techniques on:
Posted Image


Beth Wilson and I were in Hershey on Monday at the PMCA and look what we found!!! The solution to the flexible mold problem - made by Cabrellon this little gem holds those floppy molds and makes them easy to work with. It's magnetic and has holes appropriate for the round flexible molds. Apparently it is also made for heart shaped and some of the other flexible molds.

DSCN0148.jpg

#98 ejw50

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Posted 28 April 2010 - 08:36 PM

wow nice find Kerry!

For those macaron fans, I compared the macaron recipe we got to the
recipe in Herme's 'Macaron' just now (not the recipe in 'Patisserie').

Pretty similar recipe - both use the same technique of Italian Meringue added to a nut powder+powdered sugar + egg white mixture. Ratios of ingredients are pretty similar as well.


Also just got myself an IR temperature sensor.
As Steve pointed out to me, you really have to get close with this thing. My boiling water test showed 102-104C until I got within 1 inch of the water, when it started showing in the 100C range.


Fun new toy though, and it was great to pick up that tip from everybody there!

Edited by ejw50, 28 April 2010 - 08:42 PM.


#99 lebowits

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 02:38 AM

Also just got myself an IR temperature sensor.
As Steve pointed out to me, you really have to get close with this thing. My boiling water test showed 102-104C until I got within 1 inch of the water, when it started showing in the 100C range.


You can't really measure boiling water with an IR. If you read any directions which may have come with it, they should say that you it won't get a proper reading off of boiling water or reflective surfaces. With boiling water, you will pick up the temp of the steam coming off the top of the pot.

but yes, they are fun to have around.
Steve Lebowitz
Doer of All Things
Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

#100 ejw50

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 07:10 AM

You can't really measure boiling water with an IR. If you read any directions which may have come with it, they should say that you it won't get a proper reading off of boiling water or reflective surfaces. With boiling water, you will pick up the temp of the steam coming off the top of the pot.

but yes, they are fun to have around.


Directions? What are those?

Good point. I'll try it on the oven next. Or maybe a piece of ice.
Unless somebody has a better idea about a standard in the 90-180F range.





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