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Clotted Cream


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18 replies to this topic

#1 Monica Bhide

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 12:03 PM

Help!
Monica Bhide

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#2 Suvir Saran

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 12:10 PM

I want to learn as well. :rolleyes:

#3 Orik

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 12:10 PM

Like so:

http://drinc.ucdavis...man/man-2.shtml
M

#4 Monica Bhide

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 12:12 PM

Thanks so much
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#5 Suvir Saran

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 12:12 PM

Thanks! :smile:

#6 schaem

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 12:27 PM

Count me in. I've read that various cultures can be purchased and added to heavy cream, but I haven't been able to source them. Wait, here's something...

Gem Cultures
3031 Sherwood Road
Fort Bragg, CA 95437
707-964-2922

This is from a book called "Serious Pig" Specifically in reference to homemade buttermilk. But perhaps there's more.

Also, I was once told that if you add a little Creme Fraiche to cream the whole batch will culture, but I haven't had any success with that. Perhaps pasteurization is to blame. Is Creme Fraiche dissimilar from Clotted Cream?

edit- oh, i see that it is different.

Edited by schaem, 22 November 2002 - 12:29 PM.


#7 Orik

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 12:32 PM

Also, I was once told that if you add a little Creme Fraiche  to cream the whole batch will culture, but I haven't had any success with that.  Perhaps pasteurization is to blame.  Is Creme Fraiche dissimilar from Clotted Cream?

edit- oh, i see that it is different.

And if you want to make something very similar to creme fraiche, you can do it like this:

http://www.ochef.com/206.htm

Generally speaking, you should avoid using ultra-pasturized milk for any kind of cheese/cream making, but plain old pasturized milk or cream should result in decent creme fraiche and clotted cream.
M

#8 schaem

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 12:37 PM

You're a saint Orik. So now that we're on the topic waht are the preffered, commercial Creme Fraiches? I've used Vermont and Ronnybrook, with a slight edge to Vermont. Of course, the one CF I tried in France was the winner, but not so practical for high volume, everyday use in New York.

#9 Orik

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 01:06 PM

The ronnybrook cf is not bad (does anyone know where I can get it in midtown?), I use it to finish my ragu and other dishes where that last touch of dairy/creamy/acid is called for. I haven't really tried other US brands (other than whatever was available in Minnesotan supermarkets, which wasn't great). When plain cf or flavored cf is called for in a recipe, I often make it at home, adding the spices to the mixture before letting it rest. Home made cf can be whipped (although it never becomes as light as whipped cream), not sure about commercial products.
M

#10 schaem

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 01:13 PM

I find that simple pasteurized dairy products (as opposed to ultra-) are difficult to find. Where do you go Orik?

PS I'm from Stillwater, but it's been a long time...

#11 Orik

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 01:33 PM

Associated supermarkets carry at least one brand of pasteurized milk by the gallon, so does amish market. Cream is more difficult, mostly it requires a trip to a ronnybrook location, but occasionally I have found it at the amish market as well.

Stillwater - upper mid-western 'burb where you can get truffled carpaccio, foie gras in alexis bailey ice wine and all the antiques you'll ever want.
M

#12 schaem

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 02:46 PM

Hey, when I was growing up Stillwater meant Dairy Queen and Carbone's Pizza.

#13 helenas

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 03:12 PM

Cant' you just buy the clotted cream in a gourmet store (in my area Wegmans carries it), or it's a different thing altogether?
As for CF, i think the one from d'Isigny is a winner!

#14 jaybee

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 03:19 PM

There is a French imported creme fraiches sold in NYC at Fairway, Zabars and Citarella. it is d'Isgny St. Mere brand, the same brand of Normandy butter that I think is the best tasting. IMO the french creme fraiches has a richer, more tangy flavor and holds up well in cooking.

A substitute that I make for a creme fraiche topping is heavy cream, 1/2 cup of buttermilk, 1/4 tsp of lemon juice, 1/4 tsp of vanilla extract and 2-3 tbs of sugar (to taste). Whip 'till thick ribbons appear. This produces a tangy whipped topping that contrasts well with very sweet fruit tarts.

Helena, you and I are big fans of d'Isigny, but no one else seems to pick up on it. I wonder why?

Edited by jaybee, 22 November 2002 - 03:22 PM.


#15 Sandra Levine

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 03:44 PM

It's my favorite butter, too.

#16 schaem

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 03:46 PM

I'm roasting apples in it right now!

#17 Suvir Saran

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 04:03 PM

There is a French imported creme fraiches sold in NYC at Fairway, Zabars and Citarella.  it is d'Isgny St. Mere brand, the same brand of Normandy butter that I think is the best tasting.  IMO the french creme fraiches has a richer, more tangy flavor and holds up well in cooking. 

Helena, you and I are big fans of d'Isigny, but no one else seems to pick up on it.  I wonder why?

I bake with this butter. Superb! :smile:

Jaybee you still have to treat me with your Tarte Tatin... I am craving them....:rolleyes:

#18 jaybee

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 07:02 PM

Jaybee you still have to treat me with your Tarte Tatin... I am craving them....


I know I know. Tarte Tatin for Suvir is one of the five things that are on my "I owe" list. It is number 3. :biggrin:

#19 Suvir Saran

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 09:32 PM

Jaybee you still have to treat me with your Tarte Tatin... I am craving them....


I know I know. Tarte Tatin for Suvir is one of the five things that are on my "I owe" list. It is number 3. :biggrin:

Can I help you expedie Nos. 1 & 2? :smile: :rolleyes: