Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the society.

Photo

Charcuterie: Dry-Cured Salami / Salumi

Charcuterie

  • Please log in to reply
67 replies to this topic

#61 Baron d'Apcher

Baron d'Apcher
  • participating member
  • 172 posts

Posted 29 October 2012 - 10:35 AM

Would you mind sharing some details on your technique for the viande des Grisons? Thanks!


I weighed the cleaned eye-of-round, made my salt, sugar, #2 and spice calculations and divided that in half. I applied half the mixture to the meat and wrapped it in plastic wrap for 3 days, refrigerated, pointed towards the Alps. After 3 days expired, I applied the second half of the mixture for another 3 days and yodeled sweet things to the meat. After the second curing period I wiped the eye-of-round clean of curing mixture, wiped with vinegar soaked cheesecloth and rolled it in chopped herbs (thyme, rosemary, marjoram, oregano). The second phase involved wrapping the eye-of-round in cheesecloth and hanging it in the walk-in for 3-4 weeks. After losing about 25% of the weight and developing a bloom, the rounds were pressed between pieces of wood to give it the characteristic shape I have seen and to help in drying.
The texture and flavor is pleasant, perhaps a bit musty, but a worthwhile endeavor. Truth be told, I preferred the secca.

#62 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 3,090 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 29 October 2012 - 12:47 PM


Would you mind sharing some details on your technique for the viande des Grisons? Thanks!


I weighed the cleaned eye-of-round, made my salt, sugar, #2 and spice calculations and divided that in half. I applied half the mixture to the meat and wrapped it in plastic wrap for 3 days, refrigerated, pointed towards the Alps. After 3 days expired, I applied the second half of the mixture for another 3 days and yodeled sweet things to the meat. After the second curing period I wiped the eye-of-round clean of curing mixture, wiped with vinegar soaked cheesecloth and rolled it in chopped herbs (thyme, rosemary, marjoram, oregano). The second phase involved wrapping the eye-of-round in cheesecloth and hanging it in the walk-in for 3-4 weeks. After losing about 25% of the weight and developing a bloom, the rounds were pressed between pieces of wood to give it the characteristic shape I have seen and to help in drying.
The texture and flavor is pleasant, perhaps a bit musty, but a worthwhile endeavor. Truth be told, I preferred the secca.

Thanks. (Must take yodeling classes asap.)

#63 radtek

radtek
  • participating member
  • 291 posts
  • Location:San Antonio, Texas

Posted 08 November 2012 - 02:58 PM

Dated by a few years but I'll quickly weigh in about the starter culture- one is better off using plain boiled tap water instead of distilled, purified or RO. The cell walls of the bacteria cannot control the onrush of the osmosis and die; by using tap water with minerals in it the transfer is slowed and the cells hydrate more effectively. Further, one should not add sugar to this solution initially, but only after the bacteria have fully hydrated. Quite possibly by using distilled water the relatively small amount of culture recommended by the Marianskis was at least 50% destroyed. Hence the poor performance.

I love the documentation of the experiment.

Now my question is: instead of having culture shipped to me would it be possible to use buttermilk or yogurt and feed/build a small culture up to add to the mixture?

#64 Venanzi22

Venanzi22
  • participating member
  • 3 posts

Posted 18 December 2012 - 08:56 PM

Hi Folks,
Glad to be a part of this forum. In reference to the PH level for fermented salume, I have a puzzlement! I am hoping someone out there has an answer. I am fermenting two 20 pd recipes of soppressata salume. the initial PH on batch one was 6.2---24 hours later it had dropped to 5.4. 23 hours later it was 5.3---another 23 hours later it was still 5.3. 24 later it had moved up to 5.7. Another 24 hours and it was 6.1. Should I be concerned?

Batch two did the same thing----it moved from 6.4 to 5.7 to 5.4 for 48 hours then up to 5.6 and 5.7????

I took heart from your comment about the color of the meat----mine is red and looks like the batch I made last season----it smells wonderful and is tightening up nicely in my wine shed. It is the11th day since I began. I thought that once the lowest PH level was reached, that it would stay there. Why is it moving up? Also, since it did not go below 5.3 on batch one and 5.4 on batch two, Am I doing something wrong?

Thank you for whatever help you can provide.


#65 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,193 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:45 PM

How are you measuring the pH? It turns out to be notoriously difficult to do well.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#66 Venanzi22

Venanzi22
  • participating member
  • 3 posts

Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:04 AM

I am using a PH meter and initially made a slurry of 50 grams of meat and 50 grams filtered water. I recalibrated the meter with a 7.0 solution and tried it out on a slurry of commercial salume. It registered down to 5.1 so I know the meter is working. I also tried making one of the slurries from 20 grams of meat and 2 grams of previously boiled tap water----did not seem to make a difference.

#67 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,193 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 29 July 2013 - 07:28 PM

It's been a while since I had anything to post in here, but I finally got around to making the Lonza from Ruhlman and Polcyn's recent book, Salumi: it's hard to credit them with this recipe since it's only got three ingredients (pork, salt, black pepper), but I did follow their technique, and it turned out perfectly. I used a tenderloin rather than whole loin:

 

Lonza.jpg


  • DiggingDogFarm likes this

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#68 DiggingDogFarm

DiggingDogFarm
  • participating member
  • 1,124 posts
  • Location:Finger Lakes Region of New York State

Posted 29 July 2013 - 07:49 PM

Very nice!

 

 

 

~Martin


~Martin
 
Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist and contrarian who questions everything!
 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Charcuterie