Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the society.

Photo

Best Manhattan variations?


  • Please log in to reply
135 replies to this topic

#121 Czequershuus

Czequershuus
  • participating member
  • 207 posts
  • Location:Minnesota

Posted 08 February 2015 - 09:21 AM

Tried the Coney Island last night. It is a very straightforward chocolatey Manhattan, and a good drink to try out my Marie Brizard. I recommend it if you are in the mood for something tasty and not to challenging. 



#122 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 3,376 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 24 February 2015 - 12:31 PM

The Williamsburg (Clif Travers via Gaz Regan), which is described by its creator as a cross between the Greenpoint and the Red Hook. Old Weller 7-year bourbon (Elijah Craig 12-year bourbon), Dolin dry vermouth, Punt e Mes, yellow Chartreuse.

I thought it was a bit too herbal for my taste but it was well received by its Manhattan-loving recipient.

 

16630827745_3b35957234_z.jpg


Edited by FrogPrincesse, 24 February 2015 - 12:32 PM.


#123 lesliec

lesliec
  • host
  • 1,360 posts
  • Location:Wellington, New Zealand

Posted 24 February 2015 - 07:49 PM

The Williamsburg (Clif Travers via Gaz Regan), which is described by its creator as a cross between the Greenpoint and the Red Hook. Old Weller 7-year bourbon (Elijah Craig 12-year bourbon), Dolin dry vermouth, Punt e Mes, yellow Chartreuse.

I thought it was a bit too herbal for my taste but it was well received by its Manhattan-loving recipient.

 

 

 

What are the proportions, FP?  Sounds like me, but I haven't been able to track it down online.

 

2/.75/.5/.25 sound about right?


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory


#124 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 3,376 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 24 February 2015 - 10:06 PM

You really need to buy Gaz Regan's 101 Best New Cocktails app.
In the meantime, the proportions are 2.5/0.25/0.25/0.25, orange twist.
Cheers!

Edited by FrogPrincesse, 24 February 2015 - 10:07 PM.


#125 lesliec

lesliec
  • host
  • 1,360 posts
  • Location:Wellington, New Zealand

Posted 24 February 2015 - 10:13 PM

When he discovers that more people have Android devices, maybe I will!

Merci bien.

Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory


#126 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 3,376 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 24 February 2015 - 10:15 PM

De rien!
You should speak to Martin Doudoroff; he is the app developer.

#127 lesliec

lesliec
  • host
  • 1,360 posts
  • Location:Wellington, New Zealand

Posted 26 February 2015 - 01:53 AM

One quick diversion to my favourite booze shop on the way home from work later (we were nearly out of bourbon, I discovered, when I went to make a Williamsburg last night) ...

 

Very nice.  Buffalo Trace, Punt, Carpano Bianco and my liqueur de laurier standing in for yellow Chartreuse.  Definitely to be added to the top 10, I think (which probably has something like 100 drinks in it now).

 

Merci encore, madame.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory


#128 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 7,003 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 26 February 2015 - 05:11 AM

De rien!
You should speak to Martin Doudoroff; he is the app developer.

 

Speak to him, yes.  Just be careful about going drinking with him  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:  .


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#129 tanstaafl2

tanstaafl2
  • participating member
  • 839 posts
  • Location:Atlanta, GA

Posted 26 February 2015 - 03:46 PM

The Williamsburg (Clif Travers via Gaz Regan), which is described by its creator as a cross between the Greenpoint and the Red Hook. Old Weller 7-year bourbon (Elijah Craig 12-year bourbon), Dolin dry vermouth, Punt e Mes, yellow Chartreuse.

I thought it was a bit too herbal for my taste but it was well received by its Manhattan-loving recipient.

 

 

 

Do you think the Yellow Chartreuse gave you most of the herbal component you noted? Or was it the combo of the Dolin, PeM and Chartreuse?

I ask because the bourbon substitution you made was from a softer wheated bourbon (I presume Old Weller Antique 107 proof? Used to be a 7yo but is now NAS) to a lower proof but older and typically a bit woodier rye based bourbon. I wonder if that would make any noticeable difference?
 


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#130 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 3,376 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 02 March 2015 - 12:41 PM

Do you think the Yellow Chartreuse gave you most of the herbal component you noted? Or was it the combo of the Dolin, PeM and Chartreuse?

I ask because the bourbon substitution you made was from a softer wheated bourbon (I presume Old Weller Antique 107 proof? Used to be a 7yo but is now NAS) to a lower proof but older and typically a bit woodier rye based bourbon. I wonder if that would make any noticeable difference?
 

Something to do with the combination of the Dolin dry vermouth, Punt e Mes, and yellow Chartreuse. Maybe it would have been better with the Old Weller, I am not sure because I've never had it.



#131 Annette Marron Holbrook

Annette Marron Holbrook
  • participating member
  • 27 posts

Posted 04 April 2015 - 11:50 AM

I'm not much for variations on my Manhattan, just love it the way I was taught to make it. I believe I was told to remember the original area code in Manhatta (212) to remember the recipe. 2oz Rye, 1 oz sweet vermouth, 2 dashes bitters. 

My only variation is winter/summer. 

Winter is served up, with cherry garnish.

 

imagejpg2_zps975d2ca9.jpg

 

Summer is served in an old fashioned glass, one or 2 huge ice cubes and citrus garnish (depending on which I have, lemon is usually on hand).

 

Annette



#132 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 3,376 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 01 June 2015 - 08:55 AM

Fred Yarm of cocktail virgin slut merged the recipes for the Manhattan and the Sazerac, two of my favorite cocktails, in his Merchants Exchange Manhattan. I made my rendition with Willet 5-year rye, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Peychaud's bitters, and St. George absinthe.

 

17706655004_28a4133dec_z.jpg



#133 Craig E

Craig E
  • participating member
  • 139 posts

Posted 01 June 2015 - 11:02 AM

Is Cocchi vermouth di Torino pretty much your standard sweet vermouth? What does it bring? (I've never tried it.)



#134 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 3,376 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 01 June 2015 - 03:23 PM

Craig,

 

Cocchi vermouth di Torino is a regular sweet vermouth. The Torino style is actually the most common style of sweet vermouth; see Martin Doudoroff's vermouth 101 for more info.

 

To me, Cocchi VdT feels a little more subdued than other sweet vermouths I tried, but still has a great amount of complexity. Its chocolate notes work great with Fernet for example (it's fabulous in a Hanky Panky). Diffords has pretty detailed tasting notes here.


  • Craig E and Fernet-Bronco like this

#135 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 3,376 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 27 August 2015 - 02:45 PM

Irish Manhattan (The Dead Rabbit) with Jameson Black Barrel whiskey (Redbreast 12 Irish whiskey), Dolin sweet vermouth + wormwood infusion (Margerum amaro), Pierre Ferrand dry curaçao, Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Orinoco bitters, expressed orange peel.

 

Slightly sweet and dangerously smooth. These were gone in no time at all.

 

20886917896_74ef09920f_z.jpg

 



#136 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 3,376 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted Yesterday, 10:07 AM

And another one...

 

Hearn (Jack McGarry, The Dead Rabbit) with Knappogue Castle 12 Year Old Single Malt Irish Whiskey (Redbreast 12 Irish whiskey), Dolin sweet vermouth (Margerum amaro), green Chartreuse, The Dead Rabbit Orinoco Bitters, absinthe (St. George) , orange bitters (Regan/Fee/Angostura), expressed orange peel.

 

20750965178_c4b87b2e3a_z.jpg

 

That one overwhelms with herbal notes at first. A flavor bomb with the green Chartreuse and absinthe dominating, and the Margerum in the background. Then a soothing wave of Irish whiskey with caramel and sweetness. But the wave is short-lived and the herbal tide comes back in full force. It's fascinating, although not as easy to like as the Irish Manhattan previously described. That one would make absolutely anyone fall in love with Manhattans, no question about it. It's irresistible.


Edited by FrogPrincesse, Yesterday, 10:17 AM.