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Best Manhattan variations?


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117 replies to this topic

#61 turkoftheplains

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:47 PM

I poured a small sample of Lagavulin for a friend, honestly thinking that he would love it. With wrinkled nose, he exclaimed, "Band-aids!" and dumped the rest out. I peed myself a little.

I'm assuming that was the end of your friendship.

#62 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 10:48 AM

Last night's Manhattan variation was Toby Maloney's Violet Hour. 3/4 sweet, 1/4 dry, with a touch of black strap rum. I used Buffalo Trace barrel 19 for the bourbon, Dolin for the sweet and Noilly Prat for the dry vermouth, Cruzan for the rum, and the whiskey barrel aged old fashioned bitters from Fee Brother's.

 

Very pleasantly aromatic.

 

Violet Hour
by Toby Maloney, Violet Hour
2 oz Bourbon
3/4 oz Sweet vermouth
1/4 oz Dry vermouth
1/10 oz Virgin Islands Rum, Cruzan Blackstrap (a bit over 1/2 tsp)
3 ds Bitters, Fee Brothers Old Fashion

Build in a rocks glass, stir.

 

 

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#63 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 12:15 PM

I tested two very similar Manhattan variations this weekend. I wanted to recreate Erik Lorincz's Norman Conquest at home, inspired by a recent visit to the American Bar. The Noman Conquest is a Manhattan with bourbon and Calvados. At the American Bar they use Woodford Reserve and Martini Rosso, at home I used Buffalo Trace and Dolin rouge for a more assertive mix. My Calvados is Daron.

 

Norman Conquest (Erik Lorincz): 1 oz bourbon, 1 oz Calvados, 1 oz sweet vermouth, 1 teaspoon simple syrup, 3 dashes Angostura bitters, rocks, orange twist garnish.

 

Then I remembered that I had tried a similar Manhattan variation with Calvados in the past (it's actually upthread), Sam Ross' Grandfather. I made it side-by-side for comparison purposes. He calls for applejack but I used Calvados.

 

Grandfather (Sam Ross): 1 oz bourbon, 1 oz applejack, 1 oz sweet vermouth, 2 dashes Angostura bitters, 2 dashes Peychaud's, up.

 

The differences are minor - the simple syrup and orange twist in Erik Lorincz's version, the Peychaud's bitters in Sam Ross's version, Calvados vs. applejack.

 

 

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With such minor differences they are both very good. I ended up staying with the Grandfather as I thought it was more flavorful and interesting (others may say, more rough). Erik Lorincz's version feels slightly more restrained and elegant.

 

As a side note, the version of the Norman Conquest that was published calls for scotch and not bourbon, more like a Rob Roy, which actually makes more sense given the name of the cocktail. I think I would like to try that version too.



#64 Adam George

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 03:02 PM

I'd wager that if you were to make a Norman Conquest with Scotch, but replace the simple with a spoon of Drambuie and add a dash of Peychaud's Bitters it would settle this once and for all.


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#65 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 08:51 PM

I'd wager that if you were to make a Norman Conquest with Scotch, but replace the simple with a spoon of Drambuie and add a dash of Peychaud's Bitters it would settle this once and for all.

 

 

 

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#66 Rafa

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 08:56 PM

Well?


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#67 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 09:53 AM

Well?

Sorry for the unbearable suspense. I loved it. With Scotch and Drambuie, it's more complex than the bourbon version. I wonder if that is why they put the more easily approachable/mass-appealing bourbon version on the menu at the American Bar.


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#68 Rafa

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 10:04 AM

I can rest easy now. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#69 EvergreenDan

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 10:16 AM

Crap. Drambuie resistance is, apparently, futile.


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#70 huiray

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 10:32 AM

A Manhattan has, to me, bourbon, angostura bitters, a maraschino cherry (or two), sweet vermouth, etc ... AND STIRRED NOT SHAKEN.



#71 Rafa

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 11:37 AM

A Manhattan has, to me, bourbon, angostura bitters, a maraschino cherry (or two), sweet vermouth, etc ... AND STIRRED NOT SHAKEN.

 

Try one with rye. Not that there's anything wrong with a bourbon Manhattan when the mood's right.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#72 Adam George

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 03:48 PM

 

Well?

Sorry for the unbearable suspense. I loved it. With Scotch and Drambuie, it's more complex than the bourbon version. I wonder if that is why they put the more easily approachable/mass-appealing bourbon version on the menu at the American Bar.

 

 

You're welcome.


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#73 huiray

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 12:29 AM

 

A Manhattan has, to me, bourbon, angostura bitters, a maraschino cherry (or two), sweet vermouth, etc ... AND STIRRED NOT SHAKEN.

 

Try one with rye. Not that there's anything wrong with a bourbon Manhattan when the mood's right.

 

 Yes, true - rye is the traditional whiskey used and I do use/ask for it.  So I should have said "bourbon/rye"...



#74 scubadoo97

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 05:50 AM

Barreling a Manhattan can have some very good influences on the cocktail.

#75 Rafa

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 03:30 PM

I tried Adam's take on the Norman Conquest with a dash of Bénédictine rather than the barspoon of Drambuie (I'm out) and I enjoyed it. The Peychaud's is a nice touch with the apple spirit. I'll have to try it the right way sometime. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#76 Adam George

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 05:29 PM

Quick, someone come up with an ultra corny way to link Normandy, Scotland and NOLA and name it such!

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#77 DougOLis

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 01:53 PM

I tried Adam's take on the Norman Conquest with a dash of Bénédictine rather than the barspoon of Drambuie (I'm out) and I enjoyed it. The Peychaud's is a nice touch with the apple spirit. I'll have to try it the right way sometime. 

 

So basically a vieux carre with subbing of calvados for cognac? I could get on board with that



#78 Rafa

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 03:29 PM

Yup. Off-topic, but there's a nice Vieux Carre variant with Calvados as the brandy and bonded applejack as the "whiskey." I think I found it on these forums. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#79 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 02:49 PM

From the Bonal thread, the No. 65 is a very aromatic Manhattan variation with rye, Bonal, falernum, and bitters (Angostura + orange).

 

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Recently I also liked this one very much - Stood Up by Michael McIlroy. It's a 50:50 rye Manhattan with a heavy rinse of Luxardo Bitters (I used Campari - they are very similar). A bit bittersweet, lighter than a regular Manhattan. A perfect apéritif.

 

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#80 Katie Meadow

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 07:44 PM

At my new favorite bar I had something called a Downward Spiral: Rittenhouse rye, amaro ciociaro, framboise and orange bitters. I was worried it might be too sweet with the framboise, but was assured that the framboise was very minimal. It was, and the drink was delicious and in no way sweet. It was served with a twist which I suspect was orange (this bar is very dark!) Actually my drink looked exactly like the drink above. Lacking framboise, perhaps a fine drink could be made by just tossing in a couple of bruised fresh raspberries.  



#81 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 06:05 PM

Yup. Off-topic, but there's a nice Vieux Carre variant with Calvados as the brandy and bonded applejack as the "whiskey." I think I found it on these forums. 

Here.

I have to admit that I don't really understand the calvados + bonded applejack combo, because they are very similar. 



#82 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:57 AM

Michael McIlroy's Greenpoint is truly excellent. It's very harmonious and I love the herbal notes from the chartreuse.

2 oz rye (Bulleit), 1/2 sweet vermouth (Dolin), 1/2 oz yellow chartreuse, 2 dashes Angostura bitters, 1 dash orange bitters (Angostura).

 

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#83 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 10:32 AM

Another day, another Manhattan variation. This one, The Old Friends, is from Sydney's bar Eau de Vie. It's a kitchen-sink approach to a Manhattan with a little bit of everything. I made the cocktail based on the recipe published in Speakeasy Cocktails, but there is a version in their book that is heavier on the Cynar that I want to try too.

1.75 oz rye (Bulleit), 1 oz sweet vermouth (Dolin), 4 tsp Cynar (4 tsp = 2/3 oz; I used 3 tsp = 0.5 oz), dash absinthe (St. George), dash Angostura bitters, dash Peychaud's bitters, stir, strain over large ice cube (served up), lemon and orange twist, brandied cherry.

 

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#84 huiray

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 08:42 PM

Whatever the variation, how cold do you folks like it?  With or without ice bits floating in it?  Shaken or stirred?



#85 brinza

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 12:26 PM

Michael McIlroy's Greenpoint is truly excellent. It's very harmonious and I love the herbal notes from the chartreuse.
2 oz rye (Bulleit), 1/2 sweet vermouth (Dolin), 1/2 oz yellow chartreuse, 2 dashes Angostura bitters, 1 dash orange bitters (Angostura).
 
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I like the sound of this, but I lack Yellow Chartreuse. I might try it with Dolin's Genepy des Alpes, which is more akin to Green Chartreuse, but a touch sweeter. A couple drops of Benedictine might provide the dark spice notes of the Yellow Chartreuse.

That No. 65 looks enticing as well, and I do happen to have Bonal and Falernum.
Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

#86 brinza

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Posted 02 April 2014 - 09:46 AM

The variation on the Greenpoint using the Genepy des Alpes was wonderful. I didn't bother with the "drops of Benedictine" feeling that there would be enough going on without it. The subtle taste of the Genepy came through just enough and the overall taste probably differs enough from the Greenpoint to have its own name. I'll have to think on it. Something less silly than "Manhatterhorn" which is all I can think of at the moment.
Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

#87 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 02 April 2014 - 09:52 AM

I call that name inspired.



#88 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 11:20 AM

The Home on the Range is an orange-flavored Manhattan, with Cointreau replacing half of the sweet vermouth. I used 2 oz of Bulleit rye, 1/2 oz Dolin rouge, 1/2 oz Cointreau, and a couple of dashes of Miracle Miles forbidden bitters (Angostura works great too). These ratios and ingredients are from the Bartender's Choice app. CocktailDB has a version with bourbon and Dubonnet.

 

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#89 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 12:47 PM

Like lesliec, sbumgarner, brinza, ChrisTaylor, and Czequershuus on the Drinks! thread, I tried the Armistice. Rye, dry vermouth, maraschino liqueur, green chartreuse, whiskey barrel-aged bitters.

 

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Very nice drink. At first I was a bit overwhelmed by the chartreuse and maraschino, but it's almost like it has a second wind, with an unexpected finish where the rye becomes very prominent. This will be a repeat for sure.



#90 EvergreenDan

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Posted 12 April 2014 - 04:44 AM

I tried the Armistice too. Whereas I find that Leopold Maraschino usually gets lost, even the 1/4 oz in this deal came through nicely. Lovely.


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