Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Cooking in your Thermomix


  • Please log in to reply
64 replies to this topic

#31 KennethT

KennethT
  • participating member
  • 877 posts
  • Location:New York, NY

Posted 07 December 2009 - 05:30 PM

My friend uses the thermomix all the time for cooking (as opposed to baking) - all kinds of mashed root vegetables, soups, sauces, baby food...

He's got a problem now, though... he just got an error code 39 and doesn't know how to fix it... any ideas??

#32 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,237 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 07 December 2009 - 05:50 PM


Last night I made the panattone from the UK thermomix site here. I don't have instant yeast in the house and I foolishly used 1 1/2 tsp of regular yeast (soaked of course). I ended up with a lovely loaf, but it wasn't panattone. It was quite compact - excellent flavour thought. I'll make it again tonight adding about a tbsp of yeast and anticipate that this will allow the dough to rise to the expected loft.



I think you need to extend the proofing period. I made the brioche from the recipe book and it took twice as long to double in size as the recipe indicated.
I have found that with panattone, as well as with stollen, the fruit and spices will retard the action of the yeast somewhat. Especially with regular dry yeast.

I wish I could get fresh yeast - so many of my old recipes were developed with it and just don't behave the way they should with regular or "instant" yeast.

I can get fresh yeast - they sell at at Denninger's which is a local european store. But I'm sure just adding more yeast and waiting longer will do the trick. I think I've waited a little late tonight to get started, although I could mix it up, start the first proof then put it in the pan and into the fridge overnight for the second rise.

#33 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,269 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 07 December 2009 - 09:01 PM

My friend uses the thermomix all the time for cooking (as opposed to baking) - all kinds of mashed root vegetables, soups, sauces, baby food...

He's got a problem now, though... he just got an error code 39 and doesn't know how to fix it... any ideas??


His best bet would be to go to this site, scroll down to the bottom and click on "Contact" and ask the question.

Or join this forum http://www.forumther...m/index.php?www and ask the question there.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#34 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 5,914 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 08 December 2009 - 03:09 AM

My intention last night was to make a whole meal in the TMX: Steamed salmon filets with olive oil and lemon, steamed potatoes and steamed vegetables. It did not go well but I can't blame Big Bertha. Just as I started I got a call from my daughter who was stranded with my granddaughter in a car that was going nowhere. By the time I got them safely home and re-started dinner I managed to overcook the salmon, forgot all about the vegetables and the only thing that worked to perfection were the steamed potatoes! The salmon filets were so thin that I suspect no cooking method would have resulted in moist, flaky salmon. So I will have to try again to see what Bertha can do in terms of a full, fast meal.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#35 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 5,914 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 08 December 2009 - 03:16 AM

My friend uses the thermomix all the time for cooking (as opposed to baking) - all kinds of mashed root vegetables, soups, sauces, baby food...

He's got a problem now, though... he just got an error code 39 and doesn't know how to fix it... any ideas??


Don't know if this will help - it's for the TM31 not the TM21

Error messages of the appliance can be reset as
follows:

By pulling the mains plug:
E.r 23, 28, 32, 38, 39, 70

By turning the speed selector to "open lid" and
then to "closed lid" :
E.r 22, 24-27, 29-31, 34-37, 51-69 (if I am reading the symbols correctly!)

Only by Vorwerk customer service:
E.r 71, 72
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#36 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,237 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 10 December 2009 - 08:28 PM

Over in the Ad Hoc at Home thread, OliverB is making cauliflower soup. I don't have the book (yet), but I think I've got most of the ingredients from reading his description.

It occurred to me that this soup would be the perfect item for the TMX. I chopped up a head of cauliflower, a leek and half an onion and put it in the steamer basket and let it steam for about 30 minutes on varoma temperature.

I added the steamed veg to about 1 cup of the steaming liquid, a cup of milk, a cup of heavy cream, a bit of curry powder, salt and pepper. I simmered this together for about 30 minutes, let it cool for a bit, then blitzed at speed 7 for 30 seconds or so.

It's a wonderful soup, I'll have to make the accouterments to go with it tomorrow - the beet slices and the croutons.

Who needs a vitamix!

#37 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,269 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 11 December 2009 - 09:52 AM

That sounds soooooo good, Kerry.
I've lost track of the different soups I have thrown together in the TMX, none with a particular recipe - as in spite of the fine cookbook and many recipes available online, I am still a "seat-of-the-pants" cook and tend to operate as I have ever done, selecting what looks interesting in the fridge and/or pantry.
Unfortunately I am rarely able to duplicate my results exactly every time but I like variety and only have to please myself, most of the time.

I had some leftover steamed new potatoes and after steaming some broccoli flowerets in the basket, I put some turkey stock (about 1 1/2 cups and strongly flavored with onions and garlic) into the bowl, tossed in the potatoes and the broccoli and turned it on to temp 90 at speed 3 until there was steam coming up. I then tossed in some chunks of sharp cheddar (about 6 ounces-half of a 12-oz chunk), turned the speed up to 7-8 (with the cup in place) for 1 minute and had a lovely broc/cheese/potato soup.

For some drop-in guests, I also made a white bean/lentil hummus, using canned beans, olive oil, fresh garlic and lemon juice and with a pinch of pimenton - lovely smoky flavor, plus salt and pepper. I always have pita bread in the freezer as it only takes a couple of minutes to thaw and heat it in the oven - in a damp brown-paper bag.
Topped with some chopped parsley.

Edited by andiesenji, 11 December 2009 - 09:55 AM.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#38 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,269 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 12 December 2009 - 09:59 AM

Helene, a Canadian Thermomix fan, who blogs about the machine, and has a wealth of experience with it, has converted one of my antique family recipes for use in the Thermomix.

The link is here: http://www.superkitc...hen-recipe.html

This is the cocoa fruitcake that I posted in RecipeGullet some time back - but this is a more manageable size that works nicely in the Thermomix.
And much, much speedier than my old version.

I have to take my hat off to Helene, this task required some significant juggling.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#39 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,237 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 12 December 2009 - 10:52 AM

Helene, a Canadian Thermomix fan, who blogs about the machine, and has a wealth of experience with it, has converted one of my antique family recipes for use in the Thermomix.

The link is here: http://www.superkitc...hen-recipe.html

This is the cocoa fruitcake that I posted in RecipeGullet some time back - but this is a more manageable size that works nicely in the Thermomix.
And much, much speedier than my old version.

I have to take my hat off to Helene, this task required some significant juggling.

Looks tasty - I'll have to try it. Needs an amount of fruit and nuts first however.

Working on another panettone recipe right now. I left the first stage in the TMX overnight - it was crawling out the top this morning.

#40 crinoidgirl

crinoidgirl
  • participating member
  • 185 posts
  • Location:Redford (Detroit), MI

Posted 12 December 2009 - 12:38 PM

I'm intrigued by this thing. Approximately how much does it cost for a TMX here in the states, shipped from BC?
V

#41 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,237 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 12 December 2009 - 02:30 PM

I'm intrigued by this thing. Approximately how much does it cost for a TMX here in the states, shipped from BC?

Andie should be able to give a definite answer - but I think around $1600 US.

#42 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,237 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 13 December 2009 - 07:07 PM

So these are my two latest attempts at panettone. This first picture is the recipe from the UK thermomix site mentioned previously.

Library - 11008.jpg

The second loaf was from
this site. Some modification. The crumb was much more satisfactory, but the flavour needs a bit of tweeking.

Library - 11007.jpg

Edited by Kerry Beal, 13 December 2009 - 07:08 PM.


#43 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,269 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 02 January 2010 - 09:46 AM

For those who want to cook things that are temp critical in the TMX, here is what I did.
I don't trust the temp sensor in the TMX - I don't think it is quite accurate enough for some things.

I drilled a hole in the flange that allows the probe of the Thermapen to be inserted. Should work with other probes too, although the ones with a wire should be taped to the handle so they can't drop through.

HPIM2458.JPG
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#44 A Canadian Foodie

A Canadian Foodie
  • participating member
  • 33 posts
  • Location:Edmonton ALberta

Posted 26 February 2010 - 10:36 PM

For those who want to cook things that are temp critical in the TMX, here is what I did.
I don't trust the temp sensor in the TMX - I don't think it is quite accurate enough for some things.

I drilled a hole in the flange that allows the probe of the Thermapen to be inserted. Should work with other probes too, although the ones with a wire should be taped to the handle so they can't drop through.

HPIM2458.JPG


Thank you!
What a brilliant idea!!!
Make it Happen
Valerie: A Canadian Foodie
Email me
http://www.acanadianfoodie.com
I love my Thermomix!

#45 Paola

Paola
  • participating member
  • 15 posts
  • Location:Mexico DF

Posted 18 March 2010 - 11:50 AM

I'm hoping that some of you Thermomix experts can give me some advice. The machine sounds fascinating, and I am very curious to try it. Right now I have a couple of projects that need my immediate attention, and I though I have been researching other machines, I think the Thermomix might be the best.

First, I am looking for a wet-grinder for processing all the whole grains and pulses used in Indian cuisine.
Second, I am looking for a grinder with which to make pure nut butters.
Third, I am looking for a grinder to finely process chiles and spices, for example for Mexican mole.

Can the Thermomix do a good job with all these tasks? I've also looked into Vita-mix and Sumeet (which I understand now have manufacturing problems and are difficult to order). Any thoughts or suggestions? Have any of you compared these products?

How smooth does the Thermomix process things such as nut butters, gianduja, and simpler stuff like soups?
How finely does it grind?

Thanks so much for your help! I am totally confused and the sums are too big for me to take the plunge without input from the experts! :)

Edited by Paola, 18 March 2010 - 11:52 AM.

hungryburro.com-- tasty healthy food from around the world

#46 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,237 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 18 March 2010 - 11:57 AM

I'm hoping that some of you Thermomix experts can give me some advice. The machine sounds fascinating, and I am very curious to try it. Right now I have a couple of projects that need my immediate attention, and I though I have been researching other machines, I think the Thermomix might be the best.

First, I am looking for a wet-grinder for processing all the whole grains and pulses used in Indian cuisine.
Second, I am looking for a grinder with which to make pure nut butters.
Third, I am looking for a grinder to finely process chiles and spices, for example for Mexican mole.

Can the Thermomix do a good job with all these tasks? I've also looked into Vita-mix and Sumeet (which I understand now have manufacturing problems and are difficult to order). Any thoughts or suggestions? Have any of you compared these products?

How smooth does the Thermomix process things such as nut butters, gianduja, and simpler stuff like soups?
How finely does it grind?

Thanks so much for your help! I am totally confused and the sums are too big for me to take the plunge without input from the experts! :)

I think the TMX would handle all these tasks. I had to make hazelnut paste 2 days ago in large quantity. I think I succeeded in damaging one of the jars on my sumeet doing it. So bunged everything in the TMX and got a paste as smooth as that I had made in the sumeet.

I was speaking to Mayear at Sumeet last week, they are waiting for a shipment from India but as you say there is a manufacturing problem with the jars so they think it will be another week or two before they ship.

You can essentially grind just about anything to a paste in the TMX.

#47 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,269 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 18 March 2010 - 02:31 PM

Last month I made a batch of sambal badjak in the TMX and it turned out as smooth as any other method I have used. I soaked the chiles first but the spices were dry until I added the palm sugar and the coconut.
I didn't have candlenuts so substituted macadamia nuts and the TMX ground them smooth. (I did not include the trassi as I am allergic to shrimp)

I've ground dried peas successfully. I haven't tried dried beans because I grind them in my Nutrimill.
However I have ground soaked garbanzo beans in the TMX and then turned up the heat to cook the paste, then added roasted sesame seeds and ground the whole mass smooth while cooking it. Turned out nice.

For nut butters I have ground cashews, peanuts, almonds, hazelnuts and I have reduced fresh young coconut to a sloppy paste, exactly the consistency I wanted.

I've ground whole spices, including a whole nutmeg, cloves, cinnamon bark, cardamom seeds and star anise successfully. (but a bit noisy)

And I have made several batches of marzipan with great success.

I suggest that you review some of the methods used by avid TMX users on
Forum Thermomix

The folks on that forum are very friendly, mostly in Australia, and some have a lot of experience with the TMX and also like to experiment - a lot!
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#48 Paola

Paola
  • participating member
  • 15 posts
  • Location:Mexico DF

Posted 18 March 2010 - 03:19 PM

Thanks for your input! I will definitely check out the Forum Thermomix. In your opinion is it redundant to have both a Sumeet and a TMX? Do you find yourself gravitating more to one or the other for particular tasks? Any thoughts on particular advantages that the Sumeet would have over TMX?
hungryburro.com-- tasty healthy food from around the world

#49 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,237 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 18 March 2010 - 06:19 PM

Thanks for your input! I will definitely check out the Forum Thermomix. In your opinion is it redundant to have both a Sumeet and a TMX? Do you find yourself gravitating more to one or the other for particular tasks? Any thoughts on particular advantages that the Sumeet would have over TMX?

I still use the Sumeet for cinnamon - I have 2 inch diameter pieces of Saigon cinnamon to grind. It also does a better job reducing cocoa nibs to cocoa liquor.

And you can never have too many toys in your kitchen!

Edited by Kerry Beal, 18 March 2010 - 06:19 PM.


#50 peterm2

peterm2
  • participating member
  • 88 posts

Posted 20 March 2010 - 05:35 AM

I think the TMX would handle all these tasks. I had to make hazelnut paste 2 days ago in large quantity. I think I succeeded in damaging one of the jars on my sumeet doing it. So bunged everything in the TMX and got a paste as smooth as that I had made in the sumeet.

I was speaking to Mayear at Sumeet last week, they are waiting for a shipment from India but as you say there is a manufacturing problem with the jars so they think it will be another week or two before they ship.

You can essentially grind just about anything to a paste in the TMX.


Oh man, I really like my Thermomix, not the least of reasons being I got to cancel my Sumeet order after hearing "two weeks" every time I called for over a year! The Thermomix is a wonderful piece of machinery that gives me nothing but pleasure every time I use it, not to mention the best-consistency oatmeal I have ever had. A great way to start the day.

#51 Robert Jueneman

Robert Jueneman
  • participating member
  • 411 posts
  • Location:Santa Fe, NM

Posted 08 July 2011 - 02:52 PM

I've had my Thermomix for a couple of days now, and think I am going to really like it.

So far, I've made the vegetable stock on page 17 of the cookbook (WAY, WAY too salty!), beef stroganoff (great!), chicken liver pate (not as solid as I would like, and I don't know what to do about it), and tonight it will be the mushroom risotto.

The TMX recipe calls for 1100 g of water, but I think I will substitute store-bought chicken stock instead, and I probably won't use the vegetable stock -- or only a little. I may add some fresh tomatoes and basil, and perhaps some olives.

For the last four or five years, I've cooked nearly everything sous vide, just because I don't have time to waste stirring the pot. But with the Thermomix to do that for me, things may change for the better!

I really like the idea of drilling a whole in the spatula, so as to allow inserting an external thermometer for a more accurate temperature reading. Once you get used to demanding better than 0.5C accuracy for sous vide, it's a hard habit to break. The first step will be to calibrate the device to see how accurate it is, and then we'll see if any adjustments are possible.

Has anyone had any experience using the Thermomix at high altitude? I'm at 7000 ft. (2133 m), so there is no way that water will reach 100C. What effect that will have on the Verona, and whether recipes need to be adjusted accordingly, I haven't any idea.

Bob

#52 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,269 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 08 July 2011 - 09:28 PM

I lent my TM31 to a friend who lives (and does catering) at Mammoth Mountain and her home is over 8000 ft. She had it for ten days.
She didn't report any problems with the various things she prepared in it, including risottos, steamed vegetables and fish in the varoma, curry dishes, etc.
I don't recall that she made any stock. She did use to to make several cakes and "slices" from recipes posted on forumthermomix, from mostly Australian members.

There is another member who also lives at a high altitude, I think in either Switzerland or Germany.

Some of the recipes in the EDC cookbook do contain more salt that I like so I cut way back on it and substitute herbs to get the flavor.

Edited by andiesenji, 08 July 2011 - 09:28 PM.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#53 lstrelau

lstrelau
  • participating member
  • 125 posts

Posted 09 July 2011 - 12:29 PM

So far, I've made the vegetable stock on page 17 of the cookbook (WAY, WAY too salty!), beef stroganoff (great!), chicken liver pate (not as solid as I would like, and I don't know what to do about it), and tonight it will be the mushroom risotto.

WE have made the veggie stock mix as well, figured it would be too salty so we cut the salt way back and just froze it in roughly measured amounts and stored it in plastic bags in the freezer.

The TMX recipe calls for 1100 g of water, but I think I will substitute store-bought chicken stock instead, and I probably won't use the vegetable stock -- or only a little. I may add some fresh tomatoes and basil, and perhaps some olives.

I usually use home made stocks (chicken, beef or seafood depending on the type risotto) though I have used the TMX veggie stock as well. I love the risottos we have made.


Has anyone had any experience using the Thermomix at high altitude? I'm at 7000 ft. (2133 m), so there is no way that water will reach 100C. What effect that will have on the Verona, and whether recipes need to be adjusted accordingly, I haven't any idea.

I am only at 1050 metres but haven't noticed any issues with this altitude. But I should drill a hole in my spatula and put my probe in to check actual temperature of the TMX. I do sometimes have to add a bit more time to things than some recipes indicate though. Made custard for ice cream yesterday and it took a lot longer than it should have (another good reason to insert a temp. probe I guess). Zabaglione is one of me favourite things to make in the TMX - no muss or fuss, just put all the wine, sugar, eggs in the bowl, turn it on and 7 or 8 minutes later perfect Zab.



Llyn Strelau
Calgary, Alberta
Canada
[size="3"][/size]

#54 Robert Jueneman

Robert Jueneman
  • participating member
  • 411 posts
  • Location:Santa Fe, NM

Posted 19 July 2011 - 11:59 AM

I've had the Thermomix TM31 for a couple of weeks now, and love it. I had to order it from Canada, and the price was around $1550, including shipping and customers duties and the Australian cookbook, but I think it is worth it.

I don't do much in the way of pastry or baking, but so far, I've made the vegetable stock concentrate (very salty), mushroom risotto, beef stroganoff, hollandaise, and the meatloaf with mushroom sauce. The later was fantastic -- the meatloaf essentially steam cooked in the Varoma, with the mushroom sauce bubbling up underneath.

I probably won't sell my Cuisienart -- the TMX won't cut french fries or julienne vegetables. LIkewise, I'll still keep my KitchenAid, in part for some of the accessories like the meat grinder and pasta maker. And I'll still use my VitaMix, in part because I like to be able to see what is going on while it's blending.

But for making soups and other dishes that normally require constant stirring while heating, the Thermomix is certainly where it's at.

I calibrated the temperature setting as best I could, but here in Taos at 7000 ft. there is no way it is every going to hit 100C, at least with water.

I drilled a small hole in the disk of the TM31 spatula, so that I could insert a thermometer probe (A Sur le Table thermometer I had previous calibrated to within 0.1F with my reference grade thermometer.)

According to the instructions, when the indicator light stops flashing, the TMX is up to temperature. Not quite so!

What I found was that the light would turn solid at roughly 3C lower than called for, and then continue to climb until it was 3 to 4C higher than called for. Because I was fixing lunch at the time, I didn't always notice exactly when the light turned solid, hence some ambiguity at the lower end.

Indicated Range
37 -> 33.9
50 -> 47.0-53.1
60 -> 58.6-63.0
70 -> ??-74.3
80 -> 80.0-84.1
90 -> ??-92.4
100 -> 92.7-93.1 (holding spatula to prevent steam from escaping) (The boiling point of water at 7000ft is 92.9C)

I could repeat these measurements using oil for the higher temperatures, if anyone is sufficiently interested.

I"m used to doing sous vide cooking with 0.1F accuracy and stability, and so this kind of variability came as rather a shock to me. On the other hand, they are having to measure the temperature of the container, as opposed to having a probe within the liquid itself. Nonetheless, for the cost of the TMX, I would have thought that they could have used a PID controller that would be much more accurate, and could be tuned to eliminate the overshoot.

I guess my next task will be to calibrate the scale against several other scales I own, to see what kind of accuracy it has.

One interesting OZ v. US terminology problem was that the cookbook repeatedly refers to "capsicum". I assume those are ordinary red or green bell peppers. Can someone "down under" confirm this?

Bob

#55 ElsieD

ElsieD
  • participating member
  • 750 posts
  • Location:Ottawa, Ontario

Posted 22 August 2011 - 03:36 PM

I am planning on buying a Thermomix and will be going to a demo on Saturday. I have been doing a lot of reading on the internet about these machines and it seems that those who have two mixing bowls are very happy that they have the second one. What is the opinion of eGullet posters? Also, is there anything else related to the Thermomix you wish you had two of? I figured I may as well get any extra parts when placing the original order.

Thanks!

#56 ElsieD

ElsieD
  • participating member
  • 750 posts
  • Location:Ottawa, Ontario

Posted 22 August 2011 - 03:42 PM

One interesting OZ v. US terminology problem was that the cookbook repeatedly refers to "capsicum". I assume those are ordinary red or green bell peppers. Can someone "down under" confirm this?

Bob


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsicum

This may enlighten you.

#57 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,269 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 22 August 2011 - 03:52 PM

I have an extra bowl and blades (actually a back-up in case something goes wrong so haven't used it) and I have two extra measuring cups/caps because they tend to become opaque with cooking some things.
I also bought two extra lid gaskets because I just know that I will do something stupid and mess it up and then the machine won't work. I have been told I am just a bit anal about having back-up extras of things, but then I am happy when something does happen and I don't have to wait to use the machine again...
That's just me. Possibly it is an OCD thing. :laugh:
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#58 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,237 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 22 August 2011 - 05:09 PM

I am planning on buying a Thermomix and will be going to a demo on Saturday. I have been doing a lot of reading on the internet about these machines and it seems that those who have two mixing bowls are very happy that they have the second one. What is the opinion of eGullet posters? Also, is there anything else related to the Thermomix you wish you had two of? I figured I may as well get any extra parts when placing the original order.

Thanks!

I wish I had a second bowl. When someone comes over for a demo I get my SIL to bring her unit over and at least I have two TMX's to make use of. But a second bowl would be great.

As Andi suggests I'd get a second silicone lid seal just to keep around. Nothing worse than the contents of the bowl oozing over the side when you are mixing at high speeds.

#59 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 5,914 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 24 August 2011 - 04:03 AM

Being determined to try some produce that is new to me I picked up a head of siu choy. I googled recipes and came up with rice and shrimp stuffed rolls.

Here they are in the Varoma ready to steam:

Sui choy ready to steam.jpg

And the steamed rolls:

Siu Choy rolls.jpg

A light, pleasant and speedy meal.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#60 ElsieD

ElsieD
  • participating member
  • 750 posts
  • Location:Ottawa, Ontario

Posted 26 August 2011 - 08:18 AM

Andie, I'm guessing a second lid gasket does not come with the second bowl? Is this also the case for the lid in that it is a separate purchase as well?

This next question is directed to both Andie & Kerry and anyone else who wants to chime in. How often do you use the Thermomix? I've done a lot of browsing on the internet but can't really get a sense of how frequently people use it. As I get closer to demo day tomorrow, I'm wondering if it will end up being yet another "toy" that mostly gathers dust. It is not an inconsiderable sum of money to be spending on yet another kitchen appliance so I want to be sure that I will be making good use of it. Or maybe I should just let the demo convince me?