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Jacques Genin Caramels

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132 replies to this topic

#61 lapin d'or

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 06:55 AM

Can I add a big thank you to Schneich for giving us his caramel recipe which was the star of the chocolates I made for friends and family this Christmas.

I dipped it in both plain and milk chocolate but prefer the milk version. This is the only caramel recipe that has worked for me. Easy to cut, easy to eat and no nasty sugar crystals formed while it was stored.

Next year I think I am just going to do a range of caramels!

Many thanks

Lapin

#62 prairiegirl

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 07:32 PM

I think I will try these tomorrow. Cooking them that is!

Edited by prairiegirl, 01 January 2010 - 07:33 PM.


#63 ncorrigbl

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 08:08 PM

Must try this recipe!!!
Hitting up the health food store tomorrow!

Edited by ncorrigbl, 07 January 2010 - 08:08 PM.


#64 Lior

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 02:12 PM

This is not a Genin caramel but I would love those of you who have tasted his caramels tell me how this compares: Now it may be way down in comparison-how would I know?? I made a strawberry caramel and I like it- who wants to play? Make it and tell me how it compares? LEt me know!

Edited by Lior, 10 January 2010 - 02:13 PM.


#65 ncorrigbl

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 06:16 AM

Was the lecithin liquid or granules? I found both at the local health food store. Still looking ofr Sorbitol, though!
Thanks
HEather

#66 ncorrigbl

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 06:23 AM

A quick Amazon search showed either 70% sorbitol solution or sorbitol syrup. Any suggestions will be appreciated!
Thanks again
Heather

#67 lapin d'or

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 08:34 AM

A quick Amazon search showed either 70% sorbitol solution or sorbitol syrup. Any suggestions will be appreciated!
Thanks again
Heather


When I made the caramels I used liquid lecithin, not granules though it is a very viscous liquid. The sorbitol I used was from the SOSA brand and it is a liquid but the label just gives sorbitol as the ingredient, no % and no mention of added water.

Hope that helps a little.

Lapin

#68 schneich

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 06:18 AM

the added water conten doesnt matter, because you boil it out anyway, but you should replace the "lost" lecithin.
i also use liquid sorbitol.

next week iam going to do a foie gras caramel, a 750g lobe of finest foi gras is waiting in the fridge to be melted. the foie fat will then be used instead of the butter :-)



cheers

t.
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#69 Kerry Beal

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 07:10 AM

next week iam going to do a foie gras caramel, a 750g lobe of finest foi gras is waiting in the fridge to be melted. the foie fat will then be used instead of the butter :-)



cheers

t.

Can't wait to hear how that turns out.

#70 Chocolot

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 09:40 AM

caramel 003.jpg
caramel 004.jpg
Very interesting recipe. I cooked to 121C. (actually 242F for my altitude) They are perfect texture. I think I got the caramel too dark before adding butter and cream. The texture is very smooth and tender. It all but dissolves in your mouth, leaving a very clean feel. There is a slight bit of flow, but not much at all. I would like more of a dairy taste as these are mostly a burnt sugar taste, probably because I over did it. I also think I can taste the lecithin. What would happen with less?

Ruth Kendrick

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#71 cmflick

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 05:40 AM

Did you use Schneich's first (10 Nov) or second (29 Nov) recipe? The second recipe has 5 times more lecithin in it and less butter. I really prefer the taste of the first recipe. I have been cooking to 252 at sea level and the consistency is excellent. I made a lot of caramels with the 10 Nov recipe for Xmas and it was very popular.

#72 Chocolot

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 11:18 AM

I used the Nov 29 recipe. I think I will try the Nov 10 recipe next time.

Ruth Kendrick

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#73 prairiegirl

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 10:50 PM

Ruth, my batch sounds exactly like your batch. I felt I carmelized the sugar a little too long. A burnt caramel taste! Everyone really likes it though!

#74 Kerry Beal

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 11:42 AM

the added water conten doesnt matter, because you boil it out anyway, but you should replace the "lost" lecithin.
i also use liquid sorbitol.

next week iam going to do a foie gras caramel, a 750g lobe of finest foi gras is waiting in the fridge to be melted. the foie fat will then be used instead of the butter :-)

cheers

t.

I decided to try foie caramels myself because I'm attending an all foie cooking class at The Good Earth cooking school at Niagara on the Lake on Sunday.

The first batch I made I took the sugars too dark - and while they were good, they were a bit too bitter. The second batch was perfect - in spite of making them over at the friends house who I will be attending the class with - and she doesn't own a reliable thermometer. I tested them in water when the thermometer wouldn't go above 114C.

So this am I set out to make the batch for the class - decided that the microwave would be an efficient way to melt the foie. Perhaps not... I'm searching in the cupboard for the glucose - when 'BANG' - goes the contents of the microwave. About $20 worth of foie to be wiped off the inside of the nuke.

I'll be making an emergency stop at the friends freezer on the way to work tonight to grab the remaining frozen foie to finish the caramels tomorrow.

But they are truly yummy - just that perfect little hit of umami - no one can identify it - but they know they like it.

#75 schneich

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 02:31 PM

if you have a superbag i will make it easier to separate the foie fat...
toertchen toertchen
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cologne, germany

#76 Kerry Beal

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 09:14 PM

if you have a superbag i will make it easier to separate the foie fat...

I just used a strainer - and not even the finest one at that.

#77 Sue Casey

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 08:37 AM

Are all the ingredient measurements in grams? I suspect they are but just wanted to double check :)

#78 Kerry Beal

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 04:02 PM

Are all the ingredient measurements in grams? I suspect they are but just wanted to double check :)

Yup.

#79 butterscotch

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 08:24 AM

I have to try these!

#80 mostlylana

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 10:43 AM

I've been playing around with these caramels. Yum, yum...
Some things I've determined are:

1) Don't take the sugar to smoking or you'll end up with a cooked sugar tasting caramel. I bring mine to about 320F and get a nice rich flavour that way.

2) Cook on lower heat for a longer time for a more developed Maillard reaction and better flavour.

3) To avoid using too much lecithin (don't like the flavour!) - try whisking like crazy when adding the cream and butter. Also, be sure it never comes off the boil when adding them. I add them both in several additions to be sure of this. I found this old topic on caramels and 'Serj' gave the French Pastry School recipe for caramels. I thought it looked awfully familiar so got out my calculator. It's almost the exact recipe that Nic Lam (sp?) gave except it has 600g. of butter instead of 700g. and it has less lecithin. Also, the method is different. Check it out (about halfway down the page):
http://forums.egulle...4

Also, I have a question... Why do you think Jacques Genin doesn't offer his caramels dipped in chocolate? He does do both caramels and chocolates. I'm wondering if the high butter content doesn't allow the chocolate to stick?? I'm going to try dipping some today to see how it works out. I just find it odd that he's doesn't do this. There must be a reason...

#81 RichardJones

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 04:07 PM

Mostlylana - interesting to read your observations.

1. I think this is a fair point but I reckon you can go darker than 320F (=160C). At Schneich's patisserie, for example, they aim for c.180C (=356F) and the flavour is very good. It does depend on your batch size, though, since I think it is easier to get a larger batch hotter without danger of the flavour impairing.

2. A lot of people note that the longer the cooking time the better flavour but I don't think this is a Maillard reaction - it's simple caramelization since there is no protein?

As for dipping these caramels - I think it would be overkill. Genin's caramels have a beautiful texture and flavour all to their own. What would be added by dipping them in chocolate? He also does a fine Paris-Brest, but he doesn't dip that in chocolate either.

I agree, the greasy surface might make straight dipping tricky but technique always has answer to any problem posed...nothing is impossible!
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#82 mostlylana

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 04:49 PM

2. A lot of people note that the longer the cooking time the better flavour but I don't think this is a Maillard reaction - it's simple caramelization since there is no protein?



...woops, I meant after the cream is added. I believe Schneich mentioned this as well.

Interesting point about the batch size in regards to temperature affecting flavour. I cut the recipe by 4 so my batch size was small. I was doing experiments so didn't want to do full batches each time. I'll take note when I do a full batch. Thanks.

I'll tell you why I want to dip in chocolate. I hate wrapping caramels! Well, I also like the presentation of chocolate dipped caramels in a box. I can definitely see your point of these delicious caramels not needing it though. I dipped in milk and dark today (didn't seem to need a foot - that's good!). I'll post with the results tomorrow.

#83 RichardJones

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 03:06 AM

I agree about wrapping. What a pain that is. Here's a good take on the wrapping side: http://mlaiskonis.ty...009/09/mou.html
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#84 mostlylana

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 12:12 AM

Well, dipping the caramels in chocolate turned out OK but I would do 2 things differently:

1) Put on a foot. Not because it needed it for dipping, but for added protection from seeping or leaking. I noticed a few looked 'greasy' on the bottom and I could see coverage wasn't perfect on those ones. I might even bottom both sides before cutting.

2) I made the batch I dipped on the firm side. I would leave the caramel a little softer next time. I'm thinking (but not completely sure...??) that the chocolate would stick better. The caramel I made was not that greasy to the touch but it was shiny and glassy. When I bit the chocolate covered caramel, the chocolate fell off the sides in sheets. If anyone has a working solution to this issue, I would love to hear it.

I prefered the flavour of the dark chocolate - but both the milk and dark were good. The caramel flavour came through loud and clear. I was concerned that the chocolate would detract, but it didn't. I like them! Just need to clear up a few issues...

#85 E.T.

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 08:18 AM

When I bit the chocolate covered caramel, the chocolate fell off the sides in sheets. If anyone has a working solution to this issue, I would love to hear it.


Maybe Kerry's solution for getting chocolate to stick to toffee/buttercrunch (by dusting with cocoa powder before bottoming) would work here too?

#86 mostlylana

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 05:53 PM

Hmmmm... interesting solution E.T. I'll have to give that a try. I'll post with my results. My concern would be getting the grit of the cocoa powder in my dipping chocolate (I use a Mol d'Art melter). I wonder if this is a concern?

And Richard, I checked out your link. How cool is that?! However, I don't know if it would be any less tedious! :wacko:
It seems to me that wrapped caramels don't have that high end appeal. I've been trying to think outside the box in terms of presentation but haven't come up with anything yet... I guess Genin's solution of wrapped caramels, bagged in a nice box - is about as classy as it gets for caramels that aren't dipped.

#87 Kerry Beal

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 06:18 PM

I've never noticed any gritty sensation from the cocoa on the buttercrunch. Might be worth a try.

I recall dipping these caramels did result in more leakers than my other caramels.

#88 gap

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 11:36 PM

[quote name='mostlylana' date='03 September 2010 - 11:53 AM' timestamp='1283475234' post='1758955']
It seems to me that wrapped caramels don't have that high end appeal.
[/quote

For what it's worth, Genin caramels have very high end appeal as just wrapped caramels. But I take your point that may not be the same in your market as it is in Genin's. Genin does do seperate chocolates as well, but chooses to leave his caramels unenrobed

#89 psantucc

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 10:22 AM

I've managed to make a batch of these and found them excellent. I'd like to have a go at a mango version this weekeded; I've got two kinds of Mango puree ready to go.

I haven't found anywhere in this thread the method and proportion for putting in fruit. Is it as simple as adding puree and stirring after the boil and before pour?

Thanks-

Pat
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#90 Kerry Beal

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 06:36 PM

I added the puree when the mixture reached 120º C then took it to 123º C.





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