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Wok burner advice needed


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#31 Marco_Polo

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 08:05 AM

Wow, infernoo, your wok burner looks great!!

I've got a wok grate accessory on our Viking range but frankly it's disappointing and not man enough for the job (even though the range itself is wonderful - with a chargrill that is almost restaurant quality - powerful, cooks steaks great, with perfect seared marks from the bars).

I've been looking at this Hot Wok which seems to have three heat controls and is rated at 7000 watts. But I ask, is this a mere toy? Or worth getting?

I already have a propane-fueled paella ring such as the Spaniards use to prepare paella outdoors. Problem here in Devon, England is prevailing so'westerly winds in our riverside garden - the wind really effects the strength of the fire and it can sometimes be terribly erratic, one minute a raging inferno, next utterly pitiful.

I wonder if the same thing might happen with the Hot Wok or other similar appliances. Whereas yours, infernoo, looks like it could function most effectively in the full face of a gale.

Marc

#32 champipple

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 08:35 AM

I've got a wok grate accessory on our Viking range but frankly it's disappointing and not man enough for the job.

I've been looking at this Hot Wok which seems to have three heat controls and is rated at 7000 watts. But I ask, is this a mere toy? Or worth getting?

I already have a propane-fueled paella ring such as the Spaniards use to prepare paella outdoors. Problem here in Devon, England is prevailing so'westerly winds in our riverside garden - the wind really effects the strength of the fire and it can sometimes be terribly erratic, one minute a raging inferno, next utterly pitiful.

I wonder if the same thing might happen with the Hot Wok or other similar appliances. Whereas yours, infernoo, looks like it could function most effectively in the full face of a gale.

Marc

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Marco_Polo,
Here's my 2 cents. I'm on a mission to find a commercial quality wok burner for residential applications that doesn't require a crane to lift. Infernooo's looks like the one, but acquiring one is another story. Most of the better ones are made in Taiwan, as Infernooo alluded to. Looking at the Hot Wok, it has potential. It looks well constructed; however, doing a little math: 7kwatts = 23,898 BTUs, which is equivalent to the side burners of BBQ grills or the burners on home stovetops. Translation: it's too weak for wok applications. You'll never achieve "wok hay" - the holy grail of wok cookery.

In my experience, buying a cheap turkey fryer burner in WalMart here in the states for $50 or less gives the most bang for the buck. It achieves 60k-120k BTUs. I've been using it on my back porch with some success, but I still need more power. I think the restaurant ones go up to 200k BTUs.

Looking at the highend rangetops with wok accessories are disappointing, as you discovered with Viking. They're no more powerful than my $50 turkey fryer - and many are not. I'm so aggravated with these highend companies that I think I'm going to write to them about not addressing the prosumer needs of Asian cuisine! Alas, the search for the holy grail of wok burners continues...

As far as the so'westerly winds, it's best that you create a barrier to insulate you from the drafts. Even the most expensive unit cannot protect you from the elements. You'll have to design a summer kitchen (that's what we call it here in sunny Florida) with wind protection.

#33 Marco_Polo

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 09:21 AM

Looking at the Hot Wok, it has potential. It looks well constructed; however, doing a little math: 7kwatts = 23,898 BTUs, which is equivalent to the side burners of BBQ grills or the burners on home stovetops. Translation: it's too weak for wok applications. You'll never achieve "wok hay" - the holy grail of wok cookery.

Thanks for doing the maths, champipple, you've just saved me 60 quid! And I most definitely take your point about the windbreak required for serious outdoor cooking. I'll look into this for next season.
Marc

#34 hzrt8w

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 01:59 PM

Just to put my nerd hat on for a moment: :smile:

BTU is an energy unit.
Watt is a power unit.
Power is "Energy per unit time", meaning how fast the energy (heat) is delivered.

The power rating should be cited in "BTU/hr" or Watts. The conversion factor is:
BTU/hour = Watts x 3.413
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#35 jongchen

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Posted 10 May 2007 - 04:34 PM

Just to put my nerd hat on for a moment:  :smile:

BTU is an energy unit.
Watt is a power unit.
Power is "Energy per unit time", meaning how fast the energy (heat) is delivered.

The power rating should be cited in "BTU/hr" or Watts.  The conversion factor is:
BTU/hour = Watts x 3.413

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This thread got me thinking. It would be really nice to have the burner specified in the first post at home. But since I don't have gas in my apartment and the thread brought up various safety concerns I don't think that it is going to work. But what about getting an electric version? I did a little searching and about the most powerful electric burner that I could find was in the 30,000 BTU/hr range. Which is kinda weak compared to 120,000 BTU/hr. I was pretty disappointed. But then I plugged the numbers into the equation above (120,000 BTU/hr) / 3.413 == 35,159 Watts. To put that number in perspective according to this article http://ezinearticles.com/?Major-Remodel---...!&id=236619

the average US home has 200 amp electrical service. To convert from amps to watts we use the formula watts == amps x volts. 200 amps x 120 volts == 24,000 watts. Which is less than 35,159 watts. So that means that if we had an electric version of one of these things it would draw more current than the average US house could provide. Interesting. To provide the needed power we would need (35,159 watts / 120 volts) 292 amp service to your house. That also assumes that nothing else in your entire house is on. The situation improves if you have 240 volt service. Then you would only need (35,159 watts / 240 volts) 146 amps of service to your house. That should give you a bit of head room. Though you probably can't run the A/C at the same time as your super hot electric burner.

I guess this is why we never see electric burners this powerful for cooking. Though I hear that some glass melting furnaces are electric ... :biggrin:

Please check my numbers though. It has been a long time since my circuit theory class.

Edited by jongchen, 10 May 2007 - 04:37 PM.


#36 myriadin

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 10:38 AM

Wow... that's pretty amazing, I must say. I have a Patio Wok, which is an outdoor propane-driven wok burner that cranks out 49K BTUs. I never -- I mean, never -- set it at its highest. I can't imagine what you'd need 100-120K BTUs for: reforging the wok itself? Yeesh!

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The link you posted has evidently expired. Can you post another one, or the brand/model of your burner so I can run a search? Thanks.

#37 Joe Blowe

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 11:24 AM

Did you happen to go to the home page for that expired link? Contact details for FlameEngineering.com are clearly posted...
So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

#38 myriadin

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 08:21 PM

I had one like that a few years ago.  You simply cannot use it indoors, a Wok on it will soon fill your house with smoke.  Outdoors, though, and it's wonderful.  Now that I had one, I can't imagine cooking Chinese without it.

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Did you get yours in the states? Are they still available here?

#39 Peter Green

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 08:29 PM

I'm joining the list of people that wants one of these. Maybe I can ship one back in September?

Alternatively, if there's an F18 crash nearby, I bet one of the thrusters would do the job admirably!

#40 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 01:02 PM

Did you happen to go to the home page for that expired link?  Contact details for FlameEngineering.com are clearly posted...

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I think that the item is discontinued. There are no Patio Woks to be found on the site -- unless I'm missing something.
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#41 budrichard

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 12:55 PM

"The situation improves if you have 240 volt service. "

US residential supply voltage is 240V. It is stepped down at the Breaker Panel for 120V usage for lighting circuits but many things are used at 240V such as wells and Central AC units and Electrical Dryers.-Dick

Edited by budrichard, 07 September 2007 - 12:56 PM.


#42 takadi

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Posted 03 May 2008 - 03:09 AM

Hi inferno

Is your wok burner similar to this?

http://www.indiajoze.../equipment.html

I've been trying to find something like yours for such a long time, but to no avail. Either the valves aren't powerful enough or there aren't enough holes to disperse the propane flame. So when you turn up the heat, the flame has a tendency to go out in some of the holes.

Outdoorstiryfry.com sells something similar but the rim is too big (13 inches wide) and it is incredibly expensive. Apparently it goes up to 160k BTU's, but I don't know how accurate his claims are

The guy at indiajoze.com apparently sells one for 90 dollars but I'm not sure if the site is even active anymore. Plus it seems way too cheap to be true.

The wokshop sells one that looks really similar but it claims it only goes up to 32k BTU. I'm not sure if I believe any BTU rating anymore
http://www.wokshop.c...tove_32000.html

There are also a bunch being sold on ebay starting at dirt cheap prices of 20 bucks not including shipping. The picture looks decent but seriously...20 bucks. The other alternative on there is being sold for about 300 bucks (being shipped from Australia).

Edited by takadi, 03 May 2008 - 03:15 AM.


#43 v. gautam

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 06:29 AM

Keeping in mind Jongchen's very important and useful post upthread re: household electric supply,

people might want to consider one of two options:

1) free-standing induction stoves dedicated to woks
2) flat induction surfaces with woks designed to operate on them, specifically Demeyere [spelling?] curved woks with 3 little 'legs' and temperature regulating metal construction [ max. 475F]

1)http://www.cooktek.c...poSpecsWok.html

2)http://www.demeyere....CID=2349&SLID=1

http://www.demeyere....CID=6914&SLID=1

http://www.demeyere....CID=4389&SLID=1

There will be no "flames in the pan" no wok hei in either 1 or 2. Save this, there is a range of wattage available, 1.8-3.5 kW to match various household current capacities, and there is a 5kW Cooktek said to be released soon.

Because so much more of the available energy is available for heating [at least 80+% as opposed to 30-40% of a gas flame], the induction appliance may be the "hotter" of the two, all other things being equal.

Safer for the cook and the house as well. Instant temperature control. Worth a look.

#44 Spike L

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 10:08 AM

Can anyone shed any light on the practicality of this setup?

http://www.youtube.com/user/chefbalcer

#45 v. gautam

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 02:54 PM

Spike,

I shall offer you a convoluted reply, the same one I was given when I went to an expert seeking advice. First, what you are looking at is a Tarhong type "fast stove". Fast stove is a literal translation of "quick cooking" or stir frying. Tarhong is the company whose products are most readily available in the US from restaurant supply stores. They cost between $ 40-60, for the aluminum and brass, respectively.

You can then choose to add bells and whistles, including a 0-30 psi pressure regulator and a metallized safety hose connecting the liquid propane tank to the stove. You should also think about anchoring the fairly light stove securely, since the wok and cooking movements will move it around.

Then there is the matter of a very powerful vent, a steel, fireproof backwall and other elements approved by the fire safety inspector plus your insurance agent. Absent these, you will be voiding all policies on your house and will be in legal violation of fire safety codes if in an apartment. That is especially grave if there are minors, elderly or disabled individuals living with you, or in adjacent apartments, where they could be endangered should a fire break out. Sorry if I sound officious, but you saw the flames in the pan. I have a lot of experience, having cooked professionally. This is not a matter to be taken casually. Things look simple and exciting but can get out of control very quickly during entertaining and such. Oil burns are extremely dangerous and painful.

I asked a woman who owns 2 Chinese restaurants plus the most successful Asian grocery in town what her advice was about home wokking. Her answer was that she had spent $10,000 to set up a SINGLE natural gas ensemble at her home, the money going towards the special (bigger pipe) gas connection, but also for all the necessary features required for fire safety and venting.

Then she took me to the back of the store where they have set up an informal kitchen as they work incredibly long hours. There they have a 2 burner wok ensemble, a beautiful compact, stable, stand-alone natural gas stainless steel stove (available in Chinatowns: I could get you the descriptive Chinese characters!!) "Your Tarhong fast stove costs $50, and my stove there costs $500, she said. You have my answer."

Under most circumstances prevailing in the US, it would be difficult to persuade me to use a fast stove indoors. Heavy duty Cooktek induction stove yes [with Asian or Taiwanese vent], gas fired fast stove, most emphatically not.

#46 takadi

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 03:09 PM

Hi V gautam

How does the stand alone induction wok work? Does the wok have it's own power supply or something? Do you have to buy a curved induction stove?

Seems really good for casual wok cooking and extremely efficient compared to flame stoves, but it seems like the price might be out of the ballpark range of casual cooks.

I subscribed to chefbalcer a while back, he seems like he knows what he's doing. His techniques and set up are very professional, so I don't think his situation is applicable to home cooks unless they are extremely passionate about wok cooking

Edited by takadi, 06 May 2008 - 03:13 PM.


#47 v. gautam

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 07:58 PM

Hi Takadi,

If you go to the Cooktek website given upthread, you will see a photograph of the 2 major variants of the induction wok stove with the curved bowl, one with analog controls, the other digital.

The energy input comes from the curved stove base and the wok has to be ferro-metallic or induction-competent. In other words, your ordinary range of carbon steel, spun-steel, cast-iron or the fancy Demeyere special temperature-controlled induction metal.

The price today is in the range of $1500 for the professional model, which is high for the casual hobbyist as you suggest. But compared to the danger of bringing indoors a fast stove with NO back shield, NO side shield, NO evidence of requisite venting and NO evidence of the types of space separations that are mandatory in the US for fire safety codes, besides the hilarious fact of NOT being allowed to fire up a propane device indoors for any reason EVER, an unsecured fast stove sitting on an ordinary stove top, if you discount all of these things any one of which will put you in trouble with the law for a long long while, then $1500 seems very sensible. Not to mention the safety factor for you and your guests to whom you will inevitably be demonstrating wok cooking. By "you" I mean the rhtorical "you" not you=takadi.

Whatever Chef Balcer is doing, may he long prosper, but you need to be clear about what technical elements of his activities are not permissible under US conditions, and for good reason. You do possess a turkey fryer rated for outdoor use in the US that you use for wok cooking. Washington has a fairly long season when outdoor activities are possible: its winters are short and mild compared to the Northern Tier. So there are just 3-3.5 months of the year when you are really prevented from outdoor wokking. Not too shabby.

The extraordinary risks of indoor fires and personal injury, to my mind, far outweigh these few weeks of relative deprivation. I believe our esteemed friend Ah Leung manages to eat well without setting anything or anyone on fire, even though he has only an ordinary stovetop. Ditto Prawncracker and Ben Hong and so many more. If people still cannot resist their creative urge, then $1500 is very cheap in terms of reducing BUT NOT ELIMINATING risk, especially that from short-circuiting. Please read Jongchen's post upthread very, very carefully before deciding on whether your living space will support an induction device and of what wattage.

Sorry to be such a stick in the mud but even a small accident becomes very expensive in so many ways: financial, legal, your personal insurance history of the future degraded etc. Please keep all these real world realities in mind. The US insurance industry has a long and penetrating memory.

#48 infernooo

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 11:30 PM

Hi Takadi,

Apologies for the delayed reply - things have been quite hectic!

Firstly, I have since switched to a new even more powerful setup (200Mj/Hr = 189000 BTU) which consists of a Mongolian burner (I also have a Duckbill burner outputting similar levels) which I have mounted on a special stand and only operate outdoors (it is just way too powerful to do indoors without a VERY high rangehood or vent above it... otherwise you will vaporise anything up to a few feet above the flames).

They look like this when you buy them without stands:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Now onto your questions!

It looks similar to the burner I purchased, but of lesser quality... the one I purchased is of very good build quality and the metal it is made of appears to be a dark grey as opposed to the light gray in the one you linked.


The highest power ones I have seen for sale online in the USA (keep in mind, I am in Australia and bought mine here) are the big kahuna burners or the turkey fryers on amazon (e.g. http://www.amazon.co...1610068&sr=8-5).


At the end of the day I created my own wok stove that is essentially identical to what the Chinese restaurants use (the duckbill/mongolian jet burners)... whether you are willing to go to such extremes is completely up to you :-) when I get obsessed with something (in this case, wok hei), I won't stop till I get it :-).

#49 infernooo

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 11:08 PM

Hi folks,

I thought I would post a video I recorded of my old wok burner today - I donated it to a friend of mine as I am now using the more powerful duckbill setup I put together.

Here is the video, it is pretty short but gives you some idea of what my old setup was capable of... the wok sits perfectly on it as well so the only real advantage of my new setup os the ability to run even hotter (not that it is needed: the old setup on full bore has the same output as the largest Chinese restaurant wok burners available from my research):



#50 v. gautam

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 04:28 PM

Wok burners of various persuasions and of the fiercers strengths have been discussed in other forums on eG. Here i want to focus on a specific model I have noticed in this video of the Chiang Mai Culinary Institute:



I am familiar with the Taiwan-manufacured "fast stoves" available in the US, e.g. Tarhong brand and those from the Wok Shop.

I find the model depicted in the video far superior on many counts. My hope is that the many expatriate culinary experts resident in Thailand could give me some leads on the make, model, availability etc. of this particular TABLETOP (type) wok stove.

With many thanks,

Gautam.

#51 Chris Amirault

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 10:06 AM

NB that wok and burner topic that hzrt8w started has useful burner information starting about here.
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#52 shar999

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Posted 10 July 2009 - 04:02 PM

After reading several threads about cooking in a wok I invested in a 32,000BTU burner from the wok shop. The instructions are next to nothing. Does anyone have one of these?
My first attempt was not what I expected. As soon as I put the oil in I had 2 foot flames. The burner doesn't show high or low and I can't see the flame but can certainly hear it. Sounds like a jet plane. Tried turning the knob both ways and it seemed to really roar in one direction so I turned it in the other and the flame went out.
Things cooked really fast, too fast. A little charred was the chicken but edible.
Also, on the regulator is the thingee that you turn for the air intake? How do I adjust that.
Would really love to learn how to use this but need some help. Anybody, please!

#53 mr.baconhead

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Posted 12 July 2009 - 12:08 PM

After reading several threads about cooking in a wok I invested in a 32,000BTU burner from the wok shop.  The instructions are next to nothing.  Does anyone have one of these?
My first attempt was not what I expected.  As soon as I put the oil in I had 2 foot flames.  The burner doesn't show high or low and I can't see the flame but can certainly hear it.  Sounds like a jet plane.  Tried turning the knob both ways and it seemed to really roar in one direction so I turned it in the  other and the flame went out.
Things cooked really fast, too fast.  A little charred was the chicken but edible.
Also, on the regulator is the thingee that you turn for the air intake?  How do I adjust that.
Would really love to learn how to use this but need some help.  Anybody, please!

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Be sure your homeowner's fire insurance is up to date.

#54 shar999

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Posted 12 July 2009 - 12:19 PM

After reading several threads about cooking in a wok I invested in a 32,000BTU burner from the wok shop.  The instructions are next to nothing.  Does anyone have one of these?
My first attempt was not what I expected.  As soon as I put the oil in I had 2 foot flames.  The burner doesn't show high or low and I can't see the flame but can certainly hear it.  Sounds like a jet plane.  Tried turning the knob both ways and it seemed to really roar in one direction so I turned it in the  other and the flame went out.
Things cooked really fast, too fast.  A little charred was the chicken but edible.
Also, on the regulator is the thingee that you turn for the air intake?  How do I adjust that.
Would really love to learn how to use this but need some help.  Anybody, please!

View Post

Be sure your homeowner's fire insurance is up to date.

View Post


Don't have it inside. Outside on a stainless steel table away from everything.

#55 shar999

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 04:41 PM

After reading several threads about cooking in a wok I invested in a 32,000BTU burner from the wok shop.  The instructions are next to nothing.  Does anyone have one of these?
My first attempt was not what I expected.  As soon as I put the oil in I had 2 foot flames.  The burner doesn't show high or low and I can't see the flame but can certainly hear it.  Sounds like a jet plane.  Tried turning the knob both ways and it seemed to really roar in one direction so I turned it in the  other and the flame went out.
Things cooked really fast, too fast.  A little charred was the chicken but edible.
Also, on the regulator is the thingee that you turn for the air intake?  How do I adjust that.
Would really love to learn how to use this but need some help.  Anybody, please!

View Post

Be sure your homeowner's fire insurance is up to date.

View Post


Don't have it inside. Outside on a stainless steel table away from everything.

View Post

Finally figured it out. Evenn if there is no roar it is still lit and you can easiy cook quickly at that temperature. I put the oil in a cold pan and wait for it to shimmer before cooking. Have had no flareups since. Wow what a difference higher heat makes in the taste of your food. Love using it.

#56 onehsancare

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 01:17 PM

After reading several threads about cooking in a wok I invested in a 32,000BTU burner from the wok shop.  The instructions are next to nothing.  Does anyone have one of these?
My first attempt was not what I expected.  As soon as I put the oil in I had 2 foot flames.  The burner doesn't show high or low and I can't see the flame but can certainly hear it.  Sounds like a jet plane.  Tried turning the knob both ways and it seemed to really roar in one direction so I turned it in the  other and the flame went out.
Things cooked really fast, too fast.  A little charred was the chicken but edible.
Also, on the regulator is the thingee that you turn for the air intake?  How do I adjust that.
Would really love to learn how to use this but need some help.  Anybody, please!

View Post


I had a very similar first experience. My guardian angel was really looking out for me -- the patio umbrella was just far enough away from the 3' high flames to avoid a complete disaster.

Still looking for the perfect side table and a really good spotlight (we tend to start cooking after dark), but the higher heat is making a wonderful difference in flavor.
Life is short. Eat the roasted cauliflower first.

#57 mr.baconhead

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 01:56 PM

I always have a wok lid handy whenever cooking with a wok, to put out potential fires. I've had it happen indoors on a stove... scary.

#58 shar999

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 04:24 AM

After reading several threads about cooking in a wok I invested in a 32,000BTU burner from the wok shop.  The instructions are next to nothing.  Does anyone have one of these?
My first attempt was not what I expected.  As soon as I put the oil in I had 2 foot flames.  The burner doesn't show high or low and I can't see the flame but can certainly hear it.  Sounds like a jet plane.  Tried turning the knob both ways and it seemed to really roar in one direction so I turned it in the  other and the flame went out.
Things cooked really fast, too fast.  A little charred was the chicken but edible.
Also, on the regulator is the thingee that you turn for the air intake?  How do I adjust that.
Would really love to learn how to use this but need some help.  Anybody, please!

View Post


I had a very similar first experience. My guardian angel was really looking out for me -- the patio umbrella was just far enough away from the 3' high flames to avoid a complete disaster.

Still looking for the perfect side table and a really good spotlight (we tend to start cooking after dark), but the higher heat is making a wonderful difference in flavor.

View Post


I just bought my stainless steel outdoor table at Costco. It's 49 inches long. Just the right amount of space for the burner, and all the prep bowls, and other ingredients needed .

#59 v. gautam

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 12:21 PM

After you gain confidence with the burner, you may choose to purchase a 14 foot metallized hose and a 0-30 psi pressure regulator that will fit in between the hose inlet and the burner body intake. Some might say this is overkill; others feel a measure of safety in having the gas tank as far away as possible from the flame, as is the regulation for food booths at outdoor farmer markets & such.

There are times of stress and hurry when things may happen or overturn close to the burner, especially for an amateur chef handling flaming oil, for instance. So a little extra insurance in the shape of a hose that is less prone to damage and a greater distance may be something to consider. Your local propane dealership [full service] or Cajun fryer mail order places stock such things.

A heavy duty wire mesh ring/collar to prevent wind/air movements from affecting the flame may be very useful, even important. It must be made to fit securely around the full circumference of any wok that you may be using and to bear its weight. Therefore, a metal sheet with holes punched in it will be better.

This brings us to the types of woks you will be using and how securely they will be resting. The type of "fast stove'' burner that you got is just that, a naked burner, aluminum or copper/bronze. It requires to be nested within a superstructure for best results and maximum safety.

You may want to decide what your cooking style is : with handled woks, pao style, as in Northern China and preferred in some Thai take-outs or the stationary, larger woks used by Cantones style restaurants.

Go to GALA restaurant equipment supply & woks to see the varieties offered. For the PAO style, even a 14 inch would tax many home cooks, once the food weight is taken into account and an 18 inch Southern/fixe style wok should be the safe upper limit for these smaller burners without a supporting collar. Even that is pushing the limits way too much. Hot oil & hot food are very dangerous and deceptively heavy.

Home cooks trying to achieve wok hei seldom realize how great the fire issues are (and how capable they are of hurting the cook & bystanders) without a specialized range hood, water taps and all the back ups available to a restaurant stove [not the least of which is a very experienced operator who does this 8 hours every day].

Even spattering of hot oil-water can spoil a party, when friends crowd around to watch. Childrens' eyes are at wok level! This might seem too upsetting to hear but it only takes a single accident. I have seen a host get very, very severely burnt by frying oil while entertaining: entertaining involves a range of mental & physical activities, DISTRACTIONS & pleasures NOT simultaneously conducive to serious wok cooking. What seems easy in the case of Thai street vendors, a certain type of omelette swirled from on high into hot oil or charred flat noodles for example, has taken years of constant, strenuous practice and painstaking mise en place. Not easily replicated on a pleasant occasion!

Finally, you may notice oxidized materials builing up in the burner holes if the boy is aluminum. Even otherwise, it may be useful to check the body and holes for any encrusations or obstructions over time.

#60 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

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Posted 20 December 2009 - 05:27 PM

Woo! Inaugurated my new toy tonight: got me a Big Kahuna—
WokJetBaby.jpg
According to some sources this guy is over 50,000 BTUs (the packaging doesn't actually say) and DAMN it looks and sounds like a jet afterburner. Took under a minute to cook dinner tonight (Spicy Garlic Eggplant from Grace Young's "The Breath of a Wok") so I think I'm off to a good start. Anyone else getting one of these puppies for Christmas this year?

Edited to add: OK, actually the BTUs are listed on the back of the box: it says 65,000.

Edited by Chris Hennes, 21 December 2009 - 08:51 AM.
Added correct BTUs

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org