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Banana Ganache


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42 replies to this topic

#31 CacaoFlower

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 06:22 PM

My formula is below. I need to tweak it a bit and I haven't decided how yet, but so far the results are good and the shelf life has been excellent. Pieces on my shelf for 4 weeks show no signs of deterioration or spoilage. If you try the formula, please let me know what you think.

2 medium ripe banans (should have a few spots on skin)
1 vanilla bean, scraped
150 g walnuts
325 g dark brown sugar
225 g white chocolate, melted
25 g butter, soft
80 g dark rum



Hello, it's my first post here, but I have been a lurker for many years. :)

I tried this delicious recipe back then ( thanks Steve for sharing it!) and I can't remember exactly how was the texture, firm or semi-soft? I would like to use this recipe as slabbed ganache and I'm affraid that the porportions are too soft for slabbing.


How could I modify the recipe so the ganache would be firmer without altering the flavour too much? Add more white chocolate? Or use white sugar instead of brown and boil it a little bit longer?

#32 YetiChocolates

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 09:43 PM

During our 2009 Candy Conference (thanks again Kerry), one of the attendees had a wonderful "Bananas Foster" in white chocolate that several of us really liked. I've not named him because I don't know if we wishes to contribute to this thread. I hope he chooses to.

In any case, I was intrigued with this flavor and put together my first attempt at getting a good banana flavor.

My formula is below. I need to tweak it a bit and I haven't decided how yet, but so far the results are good and the shelf life has been excellent. Pieces on my shelf for 4 weeks show no signs of deterioration or spoilage. If you try the formula, please let me know what you think.

2 medium ripe banans (should have a few spots on skin)
1 vanilla bean, scraped
150 g walnuts
325 g dark brown sugar
225 g white chocolate, melted
25 g butter, soft
80 g dark rum

1. Process the bananas and walnuts in a food processor until the fruit is smooth and the nuts well chopped
2. Melt the sugar in a pot with the scraped vanilla and bring to a boil
3. Add the banana and walnut mixture to the pot and continue to cook for several minutes, stirring to thoroughly combine
4. Take the pot off the heat and add the butter, stirring to combine
5. Add the sugar mixture to the melted chocolate and mix to combine
6. Allow the mixture to cool to about 100F
7. Add the rum and combine
8. Allow to cool to room temp

Pipe into molded white chocolate shells and seal.

 

Ok Steve, maybe I'm being an idiot here, but have been giving your banana ganache a go, and I'm perplexed by the boiling of the dark brown sugar.  Are you adding any water to it? If not you are essentially doing a dry caramel, which when I try doesn't really boil it just starts to melt and then burns.  Do you have the heat super low? And do you warm the banana/walnut mixture up any because it just seizes the sugar when I add it.  Help!



#33 lebowits

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 04:22 AM

During our 2009 Candy Conference (thanks again Kerry), one of the attendees had a wonderful "Bananas Foster" in white chocolate that several of us really liked. I've not named him because I don't know if we wishes to contribute to this thread. I hope he chooses to.

In any case, I was intrigued with this flavor and put together my first attempt at getting a good banana flavor.

My formula is below. I need to tweak it a bit and I haven't decided how yet, but so far the results are good and the shelf life has been excellent. Pieces on my shelf for 4 weeks show no signs of deterioration or spoilage. If you try the formula, please let me know what you think.

2 medium ripe banans (should have a few spots on skin)
1 vanilla bean, scraped
150 g walnuts
325 g dark brown sugar
225 g white chocolate, melted
25 g butter, soft
80 g dark rum

1. Process the bananas and walnuts in a food processor until the fruit is smooth and the nuts well chopped
2. Melt the sugar in a pot with the scraped vanilla and bring to a boil
3. Add the banana and walnut mixture to the pot and continue to cook for several minutes, stirring to thoroughly combine
4. Take the pot off the heat and add the butter, stirring to combine
5. Add the sugar mixture to the melted chocolate and mix to combine
6. Allow the mixture to cool to about 100F
7. Add the rum and combine
8. Allow to cool to room temp

Pipe into molded white chocolate shells and seal.

 
Ok Steve, maybe I'm being an idiot here, but have been giving your banana ganache a go, and I'm perplexed by the boiling of the dark brown sugar.  Are you adding any water to it? If not you are essentially doing a dry caramel, which when I try doesn't really boil it just starts to melt and then burns.  Do you have the heat super low? And do you warm the banana/walnut mixture up any because it just seizes the sugar when I add it.  Help!

 
yes, it is essentially a dry caramel method.  If you have trouble with that, then add a bit of water to even out the heating.  It will boil off.  It simply adds to the cooking time.  
 
On a personal note, I've not used this formula in a while.  While I thought it tasted pretty good, it didn't sell very well.  Maybe I should try it again.  I've also had very good luck with the Boiron ganache and caramel formulas which can be downloaded from their web site.  If this doesn't work for you, take a look there and see if they have a banana puree based formula.

Edited by heidih, 16 November 2013 - 09:04 AM.
Fix quote tags

Steve Lebowitz
Doer of All Things
Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

#34 YetiChocolates

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 06:59 AM

Hey Steve, thanks for the quick reply, I actually did look at the callebaut banana recipe and have made some personal alterations to the formula to give me that banana foster flavor, to see if it works a little better for me (haven't tried it yet).  We'll see how it goes, I'm planning on putting it on the holiday menu (if I ever get the formula right) to see how much interest it will generate.



#35 patti_h

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 08:00 PM

I'm glad this thread got resurrected, I've been working on a bananas foster using the M. laiskonis recipe. Steve I think this recipe sounds wonderful & I am going to give it a go.

I am so thankful for all the people on eg who share information so freely. I'm really looking forward to the conference next spring.
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#36 YetiChocolates

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 08:28 AM

I ended up using a variation of the frutti recipe on Callebaut's website and I really like the results!  Thanks Steve for the original inspiration though  :biggrin:



#37 lebowits

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 09:40 AM

I ended up using a variation of the frutti recipe on Callebaut's website and I really like the results!  Thanks Steve for the original inspiration though  :biggrin:

Do tell! (or post if you're willing to share)


Steve Lebowitz
Doer of All Things
Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

#38 YetiChocolates

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 10:38 AM

105 g dark brown sugar

50 g glucose

121 g cream 

1 vanilla bean

138 g banana 

1 generous Tbsp of cinnamon

50 g butter

72 g white chocolate

17 g rum

 

I heat the glucose and brown sugar together until the brown sugar is liquefied and smells like it's about to burn (as you cannot really tell when brown sugar caramelizes).  Add heated cream (that I scrape the VB into) into the brown sugar and mix to combine, letting it boil for a few.  Heat banana puree and cinnamon, then add to the sugar mixture and heat to 106 C.  Take off heat and cool a bit, then add butter. Let cool some more, then add white chocolate and rum. Emulsify then pipe into molds.  Could be a bit more rummy, but overall I like the flavor and consistency, and adding the glucose to the brown sugar helps with the caramelizing/crystallizing problems I was having with the dry caramelizing before.



#39 dhardy123

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 01:29 AM

Wybauw has a Banana Ganache in his 2nd book that I have used before. It uses puree however



#40 YetiChocolates

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 11:35 AM

Wybauw has a Banana Ganache in his 2nd book that I have used before. It uses puree however

 

I guess I should have specified that it is banana puree in the formula I posted, I just took bananas and pureed them in a blender.  Don't have Wybauw's 2nd book so I cannot comment on what he does, but I'm sure you don't have to use frozen boiron banana puree (if that's what he uses), you can just puree your own bananas fresh.



#41 Jim D.

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 09:17 PM

105 g dark brown sugar

50 g glucose

121 g cream 

1 vanilla bean

138 g banana 

1 generous Tbsp of cinnamon

50 g butter

72 g white chocolate

17 g rum

 

I heat the glucose and brown sugar together until the brown sugar is liquefied and smells like it's about to burn (as you cannot really tell when brown sugar caramelizes).  Add heated cream (that I scrape the VB into) into the brown sugar and mix to combine, letting it boil for a few.  Heat banana puree and cinnamon, then add to the sugar mixture and heat to 106 C.  Take off heat and cool a bit, then add butter. Let cool some more, then add white chocolate and rum. Emulsify then pipe into molds.  Could be a bit more rummy, but overall I like the flavor and consistency, and adding the glucose to the brown sugar helps with the caramelizing/crystallizing problems I was having with the dry caramelizing before.

 

The recipe looks good.  I am puzzled, however, by the proportion of chocolate to cream.  I would think that if there is so little chocolate (compared to liquids in the recipe) that the result would be quite runny, might never firm up.  But you say that it could be more runny.  I ask because today I attempted Wybauw's "Frutti" recipe for the second time.  The first time I made it, it never firmed up.  So today I added more chocolate and some cocoa butter.  The result was a total mess--the ganache separated.



#42 YetiChocolates

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 12:00 AM

105 g dark brown sugar
50 g glucose
121 g cream 
1 vanilla bean
138 g banana 
1 generous Tbsp of cinnamon
50 g butter
72 g white chocolate
17 g rum
 
I heat the glucose and brown sugar together until the brown sugar is liquefied and smells like it's about to burn (as you cannot really tell when brown sugar caramelizes).  Add heated cream (that I scrape the VB into) into the brown sugar and mix to combine, letting it boil for a few.  Heat banana puree and cinnamon, then add to the sugar mixture and heat to 106 C.  Take off heat and cool a bit, then add butter. Let cool some more, then add white chocolate and rum. Emulsify then pipe into molds.  Could be a bit more rummy, but overall I like the flavor and consistency, and adding the glucose to the brown sugar helps with the caramelizing/crystallizing problems I was having with the dry caramelizing before.

 
The recipe looks good.  I am puzzled, however, by the proportion of chocolate to cream.  I would think that if there is so little chocolate (compared to liquids in the recipe) that the result would be quite runny, might never firm up.  But you say that it could be more runny.  I ask because today I attempted Wybauw's "Frutti" recipe for the second time.  The first time I made it, it never firmed up.  So today I added more chocolate and some cocoa butter.  The result was a total mess--the ganache separated.

 
Jim, the banana puree seems to make up for some of the cream in making the consistency thicker, you may not be cooking the sugar, cream, banana mixture long enough, as though the ganache is a bit soft, it does firm up enough to shell and cap just fine.  I said "rummy" not runny as I meant there could be more rum in the mix.  Personally I think the ratios work just fine for what adjustments I've made to Wybauw's recipe.  However I've never made the Frutti formula in it's true form, so I cannot say how finicky it can be.

#43 Jim D.

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 06:48 AM

"Rummy," not "runny."  I must need new glasses.  I'll give your recipe a try.  When I was cooking the caramel-banana-passion fruit mixture (Wybauw says to 221 F.), it looked as if it was about to burn.  Good point about the banana thickening the ganache.  It's the flavoring that makes it so difficult to determine the ratio of chocolate to liquefier--some liquefiers are more liquid than others!  To make matters more difficult, Wybauw's recipes can be rather vague at times:  "Caramelize the sucrose and glucose until they acquire an attractive golden brown color."

 

Jim