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Soy What?


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3 replies to this topic

#1 Jinmyo

Jinmyo
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  • Location:Ottawa, ON, Canada

Posted 30 October 2002 - 08:40 PM

Does soy (as shoyu, tofu, miso, natto, edamame) appear in your cuisine at all?
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#2 Michel Nischan

Michel Nischan
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Posted 31 October 2002 - 12:49 PM

Jinmyo, I do use soy products. We use traditional shoyu, as well as a variety of other tamari. We use several varieties of miso and also use edemame as a welcome to our guests and in some sautes and soups. I don't know what natto is, but would love more information on it. We once served tofu, but the offering caused many people to feel this proved we were a "health food" restaurant, thus jeopardizing our concept. When we do noodle dishes, most have tofu in them.

We use these products in sauces, marinades, cures and as seasonings in general.

#3 Jinmyo

Jinmyo
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Posted 31 October 2002 - 06:54 PM

Michel, natto is (are?) fermented soybeans that stick together in a gelatinous, stringy web. Like edamame gone insane. Very smelly and very powerful but quite good. Not suitable for your restaurant though. I was just wondering if you knew of it.

While I deplore the presence of onions (for example) in a miso shiru, I have no hesitation in using miso in an onion soup. There is a profundity of flavours in miso, shoyu, and tamari that work tremendously well with many Western foods. (The nifty thing is that while it might take hours of reducing and straining meat stocks, a similiar richness is right there in that tin of shoyu. :raz: )
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#4 Michel Nischan

Michel Nischan
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Posted 31 October 2002 - 06:59 PM

Thank you. I'll have to try natto.

I agree with your love of Shoyu, tamari et al. They have helped our efforts tremendously.