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An interesting dried-pasta tasting

Italian

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34 replies to this topic

#31 Fat Guy

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Posted 16 May 2009 - 06:53 PM

I imagine the linguine will perform the same as the spaghetti. The farfalle looks smooth through the bag but I'll have to open it up to be sure. Maybe later this week.

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#32 Andrew Fenton

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Posted 16 May 2009 - 07:35 PM

Did you buy any of the organic pasta? I bought- but have not yet cooked- both the regular ($.99/lb) and organic ($1.19/lb) on Thursday. The regular pasta is indeed smooth as can be, but eyeballing the organic spaghetti, I can see that it has some texture.

#33 Fat Guy

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Posted 16 May 2009 - 07:36 PM

Everything I bought is pictured above.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
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#34 CDRFloppingham

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 04:15 AM

I think you'd first have to have some general understanding of the different pastas and what they're going for.  For example, I've mentioned before that the Latini family believes in cooking the pasta extremely al dente.  Other pastas -- De Cecco, for example -- might be considered more "general purpose" pastas.  To whatever extent possible, you'd try to cook the various pastas in ways that display their qualities to good effect, with the understanding that this won't be the same way for each brand.


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Doesn't this unblind the sophisticated taster? If you were on the panel and you tasted an "extremely al dente" pasta, knowing what you know about Latini and that the pasta was supposed to be cooked to the manufacturer's preference, doesn't this start bias you?

#35 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 01:59 PM

The dried-pasta tastings I've read about in the past, such as the ones performed by Cook's Illustrated, have never struck me as particularly credible. But New York Magazine recently put together a tasting at the International Culinary Center that seems, on the face of it, to be the best of its kind done to date. The tasters were Marco Canora of Insieme, Hearth, and Terroir; Mark Ladner of Del Posto; and Cesare Casella of Salumeria Rosi; and they tasted the pasta both plain and dressed. When I heard about this tasting, I thought for sure, finally, this would prove the superiority of imported artisanal dried pasta.

Trader Joe's won.

FatGuy?

Trader Joes and Aldi are owned by the same people and they sell identical products in some categories. I recently bought Aldis bronze cut Fusilli for a recipe and it was excellent...I wonder if its from the same pasta company that manufactures for both Aldi and TJs...
Wawa Sizzli FTW!





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