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Dutch VS. Regular Cocoa

Chocolate

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45 replies to this topic

#31 ALTAF

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 02:11 PM

I made the high hat cup cakes shown below using once natural cocoa powder and once dutch-processed.The reasults:

with natural cocoa powder: light brown color, no taste of chocolate, airy & light cake, but well rised, made 18 pices.

with dutch-process: dark brown color, real taste of chocolate, a bit dense, did not rised high like the 1st try, made 21 pices!

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If i want to stick with the 2nd try using dutch processed cocoa, should i change the leavining amonut? (example: lower the baking soda and raise the baking powder)?and how much

Advice Urgent Please?

Edited by ALTAF, 23 December 2005 - 02:16 PM.


#32 Patrick S

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 05:03 PM

If i want to stick with the 2nd try using dutch processed cocoa, should i change the leavining amonut? (example: lower the baking soda and raise the baking powder)?and how much

Advice Urgent Please?

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If the cupcakes with the dutch-process cocoa were more dense than you want, I'd increase the baking powder by maybe 25%.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#33 Beanie

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 06:48 PM

Wow. Those cupcakes look great. Let us how they turn out with more baking powder. Would you pass along the recipe? What kind of icing is that? Mmm good. :raz:
Ilene

#34 ALTAF

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 11:12 PM

If the cupcakes with the dutch-process cocoa were more dense than you want, I'd increase the baking powder by maybe 25%.



The cupcake recipecalls for 1/2 teaspoon baking soda and 1/4 baking powder. Do you mean i should increase the baking powder to 3/4 teaspoon? and in that case do i need to change the amount of baking soda?


Thanks in advance.



Wow. Those cupcakes look great. Let us how they turn out with more baking powder. Would you pass along the recipe? What kind of icing is that? Mmm good.


Thanks :smile: . You can fine the recipe at BOSTON, the name of the recipe is high hat cupcakes. You might need to register, they have a lot of desserts recipes.

#35 Patrick S

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Posted 24 December 2005 - 01:28 PM

If the cupcakes with the dutch-process cocoa were more dense than you want, I'd increase the baking powder by maybe 25%.



The cupcake recipecalls for 1/2 teaspoon baking soda and 1/4 baking powder. Do you mean i should increase the baking powder to 3/4 teaspoon? and in that case do i need to change the amount of baking soda?

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Actually, 125% of 1/4 would be 5/16, but I don't think we need to be that precise about it. I looked at some other cupcake recipes using dutch process cocoa, and the range seems to be around 1/2t to 2t baking powder to 1.5 cups of flour. So, if you want your cupcakes just a little less dense, I'd bump up the baking powder to 1/2t. If you want them a lot less dense, bump up the baking powder to 1-2t.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#36 prasantrin

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Posted 13 May 2006 - 04:19 PM

Longer version: Dutch cocoa is cocoa that has been processed with alkalai. This raises its pH from around 5.5 to about 7, making it almost neutral. Unless your recipe calls for leavening, it doesn't matter whether you use regular or Dutch; many people prefer Dutch cocoa because it is smoother (though some will say smoothness sacrifices deeper chocolate flavor). It really is a matter of taste, and you should use whichever one you want, unless you are working with pastry. In this case, the less acidic Dutch cocoa is usually preferred. An eGullet pastry person can probably advise you better than me.

Dave

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Based on the above, is it safe for me to assume that I can use either dutch-process or regular (Hershey's) cocoa for a Chocolate Pound Cake recipe, the ingredients of which are:

1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
Pinch of sea salt
4 large eggs, at room temperature, separated
1 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
14 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

I have both types of cocoa, though I have more dutch-process than regular so I'd rather use dutch-process.

#37 SweetSide

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Posted 13 May 2006 - 04:22 PM

Longer version: Dutch cocoa is cocoa that has been processed with alkalai. This raises its pH from around 5.5 to about 7, making it almost neutral. Unless your recipe calls for leavening, it doesn't matter whether you use regular or Dutch; many people prefer Dutch cocoa because it is smoother (though some will say smoothness sacrifices deeper chocolate flavor). It really is a matter of taste, and you should use whichever one you want, unless you are working with pastry. In this case, the less acidic Dutch cocoa is usually preferred. An eGullet pastry person can probably advise you better than me.

Dave

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Based on the above, is it safe for me to assume that I can use either dutch-process or regular (Hershey's) cocoa for a Chocolate Pound Cake recipe, the ingredients of which are:

1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
Pinch of sea salt
4 large eggs, at room temperature, separated
1 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
14 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

I have both types of cocoa, though I have more dutch-process than regular so I'd rather use dutch-process.

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That's right -- since there is no chemical leavening, you can use whichever type of cocoa you prefer.
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#38 markabauman

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 09:47 AM

This may be slightly off topic, as it technically doesn't involve baking. I was at the CIA yesterday for lunch and one of the dishes we had was a chestnut-cocoa pasta. I found a recipe online, but it doesn't specify a type of cocoa. Anybody have any idea if it makes any difference what kind I might use? Dutch process or not?
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#39 aguynamedrobert

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 12:58 PM

The thing that might make a difference is the Fat content of the cocoa powder. The dutching(I wouldn't assume) would affect the pasta. In cocoa powder you have 10-12% cocoa powder and 22-24% cocoa powder....that might make a difference but I am not to familiar with pasta....

Robert
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#40 Sebastian

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 01:07 PM

Those are the two most common fat levels in cocoa powders - another very common level is 15/17 - however there are many other fat levels available, commonly achieved by blending 0% product, 10/12 product, and 22/24 product until you hit the appropriate fat level...

#41 gfron1

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 08:59 AM

Just when I thought I fully understood this whole dutch thing... I need to buy a bulk amount of dutch and am having the toughest time knowing what is and what isn't. Is the Callebaut or Valrhona dutch? It seems that websites assume that you know.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#42 alanamoana

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 09:16 AM

the bulk box that i have (3x1kilo bags), which is just labeled "cocoa powder" (Valrhona) is listed on one company's website as dutched.

worldwidechocolate

from what i understand, most cocoa powder is dutched, so if it is natural, it would probably say so on the label as that is a minority.

#43 gfron1

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 10:14 AM

Thanks...I was assuming the other way around, that they would label as Dutched if it weren't natural.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#44 paulraphael

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 10:37 AM

Thanks...I was assuming the other way around, that they would label as Dutched if it weren't natural.

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The way to know for sure is to check the ingredients. "Cocoa processed with alkali" means dutch process.

I agree with the posters who say fat percentage is an important variable, and this can be harder to find out. It could make a difference in recipes that use a lot of cocoa. It also makes a difference in shelf life; the higher the fat content, the more perishable.

#45 jumanggy

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 10:43 AM

That's one of the first things I learned on the P&B forums... Valrhona is always Dutch-processed :laugh: I'm guessing most European cocoa is Dutch-processed unless otherwise stated.
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#46 andiesenji

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Posted 27 December 2007 - 11:21 AM

It is true that most, but not all, European cocoa powders are Dutched or processed with alkali.

This site lists some of them:
Cocoa powder info.

Here is another site, with even more information.

"Natural" cocoa powders are not Dutched, have a much higher acid content and react with baking soda as a levening so if you want a wafer cookie or biscuit (the kind I usually make) you have to use Dutch process cocoa powder or you will end up with a puffy item that is hollow in the middle.

(I speak from experience, having grabbed the wrong container on one occasion and the result was 8 dozen crunchy "honeycomb" flying-saucer-shaped things, not at all suitable for sandwich-type filled cookies.)
I now use labels with large type which I can read even when not wearing my glasses.

Edited by andiesenji, 27 December 2007 - 12:18 PM.

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