Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Smoking Brisket: The Topic

Charcuterie

  • Please log in to reply
303 replies to this topic

#31 Stone

Stone
  • participating member
  • 3,626 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 02 May 2003 - 11:34 AM

Do you wrap it in foil during the cook?

#32 col klink

col klink
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,015 posts
  • Location:Minneapolis

Posted 02 May 2003 - 01:06 PM

Nope, I wouldn't dream of it except in one condition, the brisket has been stripped of all of its fat and it needs to keep as much moisture as possible. But usually in that instance I'm more likely to mop the brisket with something I've come up with in the kitchen using plenty of evoo mixed with vinegar and whatever I feel like (usually hot sauce and mustard).

#33 Really Nice!

Really Nice!
  • participating member
  • 1,183 posts
  • Location:Seattle, Washington

Posted 02 May 2003 - 02:02 PM

There's a very good Web site dedicated to this. Vitual Weber Bullet. ALthough it's geared specifically towards the Weber Bullet smoker, you can apply the information to a grill or any other smoker.

Also, here's some info from my family's cookbook.



SMOKING FOOD
from Mike

First, follow your smoker's directions. You should get the basics from its documentation. (This is especially true if it is gas or electric; I accept no responsibility if you follow these directions and blow yourself up.) These instructions are for a water smoker, as the recipes are not designed to dry the food but rather slow cook it.

A 'cylinder-style' charcoal and wood blocks/chips water smoker is the most common smoker. It looks much like a capsule or a bullet about 1 yard tall and 18 inches wide. It is divided into 3 sections. The very bottom holds the charcoal or wood; the lower middle is a water basin used to keep the food moist and the upper 2/3s is where the food cooks. Water smokers can be found in hardware stores for about $30 but can go as high as $300 at specialty shops.

One of the main problems in smoking food is the inconsistency of temperature during the cooking process. This is where an electric or gas smoker clearly has the edge. However, you shouldn't use an electric smoker if it is raining or where the ground is wet or damp.

When using charcoal and wood, the secret is to start off hot. Each of the smoking recipes included here use a 250°F (120°C) as the target temperature. It is easier to start hot and maintain a high temperature than it is to boost up a low one three hours into cooking. Also keep in mind the usual variables, season, air circulation, moisture, weather temperature, wind, and quantity and proximity of coals used can hinder or vary cooking times. Where and when are you smoking? Christmas Eve in Chicago is significantly different than Christmas Eve in Sydney, Australia, expect different weather patterns to change your finishing time. A 12-pound turkey can take 4 hours in the summer, 7 or 8 in winter.

Water smokers usually have a thermometer built in. Unfortunately, the temperatures warm, ideal and hot are not very descriptive readings. To get an actual reading I drilled a hole in the cover of mine and inserted a meat thermometer.

The best way to maintain a high temperature is to use a smokestack charcoal starter. (Never use lighter fluid... yeech!) They sell for about $12. It's just a round metal cylinder with a wire screen inside to hold the charcoal. Fill it up with your coals, crumble up a newspaper underneath and light the newspaper. 10-15 minutes later your coals are red hot and ready to add to the smoker.

At first I thought it to be a little ridiculous to buy a gadget like this but it makes sense to use it. Without it, when you put coals in the smoker, the energy that is used to cook the food is transferred to getting the coals hot, not cooking the food. Putting coals in while they are reaching the red hot stage allows additional energy to cook your food and you don't have to wait 20 minutes for the coals to get ready and the temperature to get back to where it was. It works wonderfully.

Another aspect to achieving and maintaining the 250°F temperature concerns water. For the same reason you don't put charcoal in the smoker without firing it up first, boil the water in the microwave before pouring it into the basin. I use a long plastic funnel (designed for putting oil in a car) that works really well for funneling the water through the small opening at the bottom of the smoker. Try to keep the water at a reasonable level. Not too much, not too little. The more water you have, the more energy required to boil it; the less you have, the dryer your meat will be. I usually use between 1 quart (litre) for stuff like ribs to 6 cups (1-1/2 litres) for whole turkeys.

Another problem I have encountered is the charcoal smothers itself out after a few hours. I solved this by buying a good quality metal colander (the kind you use for draining pasta). Inside the smoker I put my coals in the colander. During the cooking grab the colander with a tong and shake it about every hour. The ashes fall through and the coals show their red-hot surface.

Using the right wood can add some nice flavor to your food. Soak the wood for about 15 minutes before adding it to the fire. You want the wood to smolder, not flame up. The listing on the next page, SMOKING FOODS - A GUIDE TO USING THE RIGHT WOOD, should help guide you along. Don't add your wood to the smokestack charcoal starter. After adding the charcoal to the smoker place the wood blocks on top.

Also, if you are smoking for more than two hours, you will need to add additional water and charcoal/wood. I alternate every half hour between adding wood or water. For example, if the food goes on at 2 p.m., I’ll add more charcoal/wood at 2:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30 and so forth. I’ll add additional water at 3:00, 4:00, 5:00 and so on. This method helps make that 250°F (120°C) goal as close to being a constant as you can.

So basically, the steps for a good smoke are:

1. Take the weather into consideration when smoking or barbecuing. Is it windy, raining and cold?
2. Let meat sit in room temperature for 1 hour before starting
3. Start off with a lot of charcoal in a smokestack charcoal starter (the goal is to get to 250°F
4. Soak your wood for about 15 minutes
5. Place a metal colander inside the smoker
6. Boil about 1 quart of water in the microwave
7. Place charcoal and wood in the smoker
8. Insert basin and pour water in
9. Place food on wire racks above the water basin
10. Keep smoker covered because it takes about 30 minutes to recover the heat after opening
11. If you are cooking more than 2 hours, keep an eye on the thermostat and add charcoal/wood and water; alternating every half-hour or when necessary
12. Don't open the cover except to check the temperature of the food (if you inserted a thermometer into the meat) or to remove it. No peeking!

Other things to do
I also experiment with adding things to the water. Sometimes adding 1 cup of Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot wine in the water basin along with some fresh herbs, whole peppercorns, mustard seeds, or liquid hickory smoke can add nice flavors.

Stove Top Smoking
I have also smoked foods on my kitchen stove. I use a fish steamer and wood chips. Soak the chips for about 15 minutes and place them in the steamer, no additional water is necessary. Place the tray above the wood, add your food and cook over medium heat. Cooking times are about the same as a barbecue. I've tried this with chicken and fish and have had favorable results.

SMOKING FOODS - A GUIDE TO USING THE RIGHT WOOD
from Mike

Sorted by wood
Alder - A medium, tart smoke taste goes well with beef, fish and game.
Apple - A light, sweet flavor goes well with game, pork and poultry.
Cherry - Distinctive and delicious goes well with beef and game.
Grapevine - A strong smoke flavor goes well with beef and poultry.
Hickory - Heavy smoke flavor goes well with bacon wrapped roasts, fish and lamb.
Maple - Sweet, hearty smoke flavor goes well with bacon wrapped roasts, fish and lamb.
Mesquite - A light smoke flavor goes well with bacon wrapped roasts, beef and pork.
Oak - Heavy smoke flavor goes well with bacon wrapped roasts, jerky and pork.
Pecan - A rich, sweet flavor Goes well with everything!

Sorted by food type
Bacon Wrapped Roasts - Hickory, Maple, Mesquite, Oak and Pecan
Beef - Alder, Cherry, Grapevine, Mesquite and Pecan
Fish - Alder, Hickory, Maple and Pecan
Game - Alder, Apple, Cherry and Pecan
Jerky - Oak and Pecan
Lamb - Hickory, Maple and Pecan
Pork - Apple, Mesquite, Oak and Pecan
Poultry - Apple, Grapevine and Pecan

Use about 4-6 wood blocks to start with charcoal barbecues and smokers. Use wood chips with gas or electric barbecues and smokers, or, if you want to smoke over the stove in the kitchen. Soak wood or chips in water for 15 minutes for best results. This prevents the chips from burning too rapidly which gives a bad charred flavor.
Drink!
I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

#34 s'kat

s'kat
  • participating member
  • 429 posts
  • Location:Hampton Roads, VA

Posted 25 July 2003 - 10:25 AM

My husband picked up a brisket this morning to be smoked for dinner tomorrow. I had to pop by the house on my lunch break, and peeked in the refrigerator. To my horror, he had purchased a rather thin, longish, fully trimmed Costco brisket.

Now, I know very little about the manly art of cooking with fire and smoke, but I'm pretty sure we would've wanted one with some fat on it. My question- can this thing be used? Would the lack of fat mean simply we would do a lot of mopping?

#35 melkor

melkor
  • legacy participant
  • 2,554 posts
  • Location:Northern California

Posted 25 July 2003 - 10:32 AM

Much mopping should help. Is it a whole brisket (10 to 15lbs) or a brisket flat (3 to 5 lbs)?

#36 sabg

sabg
  • participating member
  • 434 posts

Posted 25 July 2003 - 10:43 AM

My husband picked up a brisket this morning to be smoked for dinner tomorrow.  I had to pop by the house on my lunch break, and peeked in the refrigerator.  To my horror, he had purchased a rather thin, longish, fully trimmed Costco brisket.

Now, I know very little about the manly art of cooking with fire and smoke, but I'm pretty sure we would've wanted one with some fat on it.  My question- can this thing be used?  Would the lack of fat mean simply we would do a lot of mopping?

how about brining it? just got a smoker this week and will use it this weekend for the first time. i have read hundreds of articles this week and they mostly seem to suggest brining

#37 Dave the Cook

Dave the Cook

    Executive Director

  • manager
  • 7,369 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 25 July 2003 - 10:56 AM

how about brining it?  just got a smoker this week and will use it this weekend for the first time.  i have read hundreds of articles this week and they mostly seem to suggest brining

Brining truns brisket into something else entirely: corned beef.

Smoked corned beef. Yum.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.


#38 CathyL

CathyL
  • legacy participant
  • 1,052 posts

Posted 25 July 2003 - 11:08 AM

Drape thick bacon slices across the top.

#39 s'kat

s'kat
  • participating member
  • 429 posts
  • Location:Hampton Roads, VA

Posted 25 July 2003 - 11:23 AM

I think it is a brisket flat, but I'll need to check it again when I get home.

However, I do have a ridiculous amount of bacon hanging out in my fridge, that needs to have something done with it soon. This could work out well.

The force is strong here.

#40 melkor

melkor
  • legacy participant
  • 2,554 posts
  • Location:Northern California

Posted 25 July 2003 - 11:41 AM

I think it is a brisket flat, but I'll need to check it again when I get home.

However, I do have a ridiculous amount of bacon hanging out in my fridge, that needs to have something done with it soon.  This could work out well.

The force is strong here.

If it's a brisket flat you should be fine, it'll only need 3 or 4 hours in the smoker - just baist it every half hour and your golden.

#41 s'kat

s'kat
  • participating member
  • 429 posts
  • Location:Hampton Roads, VA

Posted 28 July 2003 - 05:07 AM

The brisket came out tasting quite good, but was still a bit underdone, and we had cooked it for much longer than anticipated. The following day, I went out and purchased two oven-type thermometers (my husband had drilled a hole through the door and stuck a dial thermometer there, but I was suspicous it wasn't reading the correct temp).

Last night, we fired it up and cooked some ribs. The two thermometers that I placed on the top rack agreed almost precisely with each other- and 100-degrees off from the door thermometer.

I can't believe we've been cooking with this thing so far off the target temp. Thank goodness nobody came down with food poisoning! :blink:

(by the way, the ribs were the best that we've made yet!)

#42 Msk

Msk
  • participating member
  • 352 posts

Posted 23 December 2003 - 08:40 AM

I made my first brisket. No recipe but the goal was a BBQ-style brisket without the smoke.

I started with a 3 lb First cut brisket (trimmed). It was bought for me so its what I had to work with, and apparently the butcher was crazy busy.

I dry rubbed it the night before and Food saver-ed it.

The next morning, I seared it on both sides, covered it in tin foil, and put it on a rack of a roasting pan.

I cooked it for 1.5 hrs per lb at 225 F(actually a little longer) in my electric oven. The meat was good, though a bit dry since there was no fat cap to baste the meat, and I did not mop it. I added a generous amount of homeade sauce afterwords so it was extremely tasty.

However, I have a few questions.

Should I have mopped/basted it?
Should I not have covered it in foil?
Should I have just braised it with a BBQ style braising liquid?
If can find a brisket untrimmed, will searing it set the fat so it won't render off?

I do plan to try again multiple times changing these factors, but if anyone can help elimate some future mistakes from experience, that would be helpful.

I have seen many resources on smoking brisket in a smoker, just none on trying to replicate a similar style, withthout smoke, in an oven.


Thanks for your help.

Msk

Edited by Msk, 23 December 2003 - 08:49 AM.


#43 fifi

fifi
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 7,727 posts
  • Location:Houston, TX

Posted 23 December 2003 - 10:07 AM

First get one with as much fat as possible. If I am not smoking, I use a cooking bag. There is a recipe floating around called Aggie Brisket. I saw it in the Treebeards cook book. You basically put on whatever rub you like and toss it in the baking bag with a couple of cups of strong coffee. Then you cook away at about 250. You can't really get BBQ without a slow hangout in a smoker but this makes a pretty damn good piece of brisket.

Oh yeah... No searing.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#44 Msk

Msk
  • participating member
  • 352 posts

Posted 23 December 2003 - 12:47 PM

Thanks Fifi,

I won't sear next time either. I know it won't compare to smoked brisket. Certainly not one a Texan would approve of. :smile:

I am however, determined to come up with something as good as I can given the constraints..


Msk

#45 fifi

fifi
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 7,727 posts
  • Location:Houston, TX

Posted 23 December 2003 - 01:34 PM

That recipe with the coffee has become the family favorite, short of firing up the smoker. When the kids are in town, I usually do this one because it can pretty much sit in the oven all day while we go tooting around town doing other stuff. I will say that I have added leftover red wine to the coffee and that was good, too. I think the original was heavy on lemon pepper but my general "rub" for a couple of years has been Emeril's Rustic Rub and that is good, too.

I have posted in the This Really Works thread that the big 2 gallon Hefty One Zip baggies are great for putting rub on a big piece of meat and massaging it in.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#46 woodburner

woodburner
  • participating member
  • 901 posts

Posted 23 December 2003 - 04:08 PM

I'd skip the foil, add a pan of water over your electric heating element to add some humidity during the cook. Try and locate a whole brisket, which may prove difficult but not impossible, if your in NY.
There is always "liquid smoke" you could add to the rub mixture, if you so desire.
Are you under some type of constraint, why it's not possible to cook it over a woodburning fire?
Equally important, is forget the hours per pound method. That is probably what dried it out, which is pretty hard to do.
Use a calibrated thermometer to determine doneness, (195º) or when you stick a fork in it, you will feel no resistence.

woodburner

Edited by woodburner, 23 December 2003 - 04:20 PM.


#47 fifi

fifi
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 7,727 posts
  • Location:Houston, TX

Posted 23 December 2003 - 04:22 PM

All of the "foil" techniques pail before the cooking bag. I don't do foil anymore.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#48 woodburner

woodburner
  • participating member
  • 901 posts

Posted 23 December 2003 - 04:25 PM

All of the "foil" techniques pail before the cooking bag. I don't do foil anymore.

fifi,
I thought "foil" was the "Texas crutch". :biggrin:

Just kidding, because your a great gal. The foil debate still rages, some do, some don't, many do but won't admit guilt.

woodburner

#49 wesza

wesza
  • participating member
  • 1,103 posts
  • Location:Seattle, Wa.

Posted 23 December 2003 - 06:00 PM

I made my first brisket. No recipe but the goal was a BBQ-style brisket without the smoke.

I started with a 3 lb First cut brisket (trimmed). It was bought for me so its what I had to work with, and apparently the butcher was crazy busy.

I dry rubbed it the night before and Food saver-ed it.

The next morning, I seared it on both sides, covered it in tin foil, and put it on a rack of a roasting pan.

I cooked it for 1.5 hrs per lb at 225 F(actually a little longer) in my electric oven. The meat was good, though a bit dry since there was no fat cap to baste the meat, and I did not mop it. I added a generous amount of homeade sauce afterwords so it was extremely tasty.

However, I have a few questions.

Should I have mopped/basted it?
Should I not have covered it in foil?
Should I have just braised it with a BBQ style braising liquid?
If can find a brisket untrimmed, will searing it set the fat so it won't render off?

I do plan to try again multiple times changing these factors, but if anyone can help elimate some future mistakes from experience, that would be helpful.

I have seen many resources on smoking brisket in a smoker, just none on trying to replicate a similar style, withthout smoke, in an oven.


Thanks for your help.

Msk

:blink: :rolleyes:

MsK: I responded to a similar posting on Chowhound in July 03, 2003 on the General Topic Board: "Slow Dry Roast for a Beef Brisket". This recipe response that I posted received over 30 positive email responses and i've also gotten email from posters who tried it for this Chanacuah with success.

This is a fall apart in the mouth, effective recipe.

If your not able to find this recipe, since i'm not computer savy enough to provide a link i'll attempt to one finger type in onto eGullet for your benefit.

Irwin
I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

#50 woodburner

woodburner
  • participating member
  • 901 posts

Posted 23 December 2003 - 06:37 PM

MsK: I responded to a similar posting on Chowhound in July 03, 2003 on the General Topic Board: "Slow Dry Roast for a Beef Brisket". This recipe response that I posted received over 30 positive email responses and i've also gotten email from posters who tried it for this Chanacuah with success.

This is a fall apart in the mouth, effective recipe.

If your not able to find this recipe, since i'm not computer savy enough to provide a link i'll attempt to one finger type in onto eGullet for your benefit.

Irwin

Save those digits Irwin.
This should help:

Maybe you could just cut and paste it right here on this board??

Irwin's Writings

woodburner

#51 wesza

wesza
  • participating member
  • 1,103 posts
  • Location:Seattle, Wa.

Posted 23 December 2003 - 10:26 PM


MsK: I responded to a similar posting on Chowhound in July 03, 2003 on the General Topic Board: "Slow Dry Roast for a Beef Brisket". This recipe response that I posted received over 30 positive email responses and i've also gotten email from posters who tried it for this Chanacuah with success.

This is a fall apart in the mouth, effective recipe.

If your not able to find this recipe, since i'm not computer savy enough to provide a link i'll attempt to one finger type in onto eGullet for your benefit.

Irwin

Save those digits Irwin.
This should help:

Maybe you could just cut and paste it right here on this board??

Irwin's Writings

woodburner

:rolleyes:

Cut & Paste is again something beyond my expertise. I'm able to dig out most things available on the internet, but most remedial things i've little or no experience in like utilizing links, scanning or digital photography. Eve4n my color printer is set up only for black.

Thank you very much for entering the link onto eGullet. I tried several times thru properties but wasn't successfull. Sometimes i'm lucky.

Irwin
I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

#52 Fat Guy

Fat Guy
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 29,303 posts
  • Location:New York, NY

Posted 23 December 2003 - 10:36 PM

Smoked paprika (the good stuff from Spain) in the rub will contribute some smoke flavor.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)


#53 Dave the Cook

Dave the Cook

    Executive Director

  • manager
  • 7,369 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 23 December 2003 - 10:58 PM

Smoked paprika (the good stuff from Spain) in the rub will contribute some smoke flavor.

Or ground chipotle, though usually you can't use it as liberally as paprika.

I second woodburner's warning about determining doneness. The best way I've found for determining this point, if you don't trust your sense of touch, is to track the temperature. It will level off soomewhere between 185 and 195. Be patient. Once the temperature starts rising again, you've fully converted all the collagen, and it's time to pull it.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.


#54 woodburner

woodburner
  • participating member
  • 901 posts

Posted 24 December 2003 - 01:47 PM

This is a fall apart in the mouth, effective recipe.

Irwin

Irwin,
It's my experience that at a finishing temperature of 215º, as you suggest, this meat is beyond slicing, but ok for shredding.
Is that your experience?

woodburner

#55 wesza

wesza
  • participating member
  • 1,103 posts
  • Location:Seattle, Wa.

Posted 24 December 2003 - 02:26 PM

This is a fall apart in the mouth, effective recipe.

Irwin

Irwin,
It's my experience that at a finishing temperature of 215º, as you suggest, this meat is beyond slicing, but ok for shredding.
Is that your experience?

woodburner

Woodburner: Since I generally use a Whole Packer Trimmed Brisket for my method of cooking and not a leaner Flat cut trimmed brisket it requires the higher internal temperature to break down enough collegin, due to the additional fat cover on the brisket.

This was the temperture level used by the Winners of many of the Barbeque Cookouts that i've judged or researched on thru the years and it's also used often in Texas in Restaurants featuring Briskets.

If the Brisket is allowed to set after being brought to the temperature the Meat doesn't fall apart and slices easily starting from the point end to the finish. This is the same method using in cutting Deli Kosher Corned Beef, that if sliced differently also will shred.

This temperature is also generally used for many Pot Roasted Beef Cuts such as Bottom Round and Chuck or Shoulder Roasts that are also Sliced for Service.

It's also true that this temperture is correct for Shredding Beef and it's often done that way for many Mexican Dishes and Chilli's by just pulling or cross cutting and shredding, tastes good that way also, especially when sauced.

Irwin
I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

#56 budrichard

budrichard
  • participating member
  • 1,710 posts

Posted 25 December 2003 - 05:21 AM

Don't sear! The crust formed will inhibit moisture transfer into the meat which is what you want to keep it tender.
Quite frankly I believe that you are wasting your time by your method.
We either slow smoke on a Weber(it can be done) with a dry rub with a whole briket with fat cap or brine with spices and saltpeter for a month and then cook ala corned beef.
If you must do it in an oven, I would dry rub for a couple of days, add a little liquid smoke and then put into a braising liquid(beer) and into the oven for a slow cook.-Fat cap, low heat and moisture are the keys to good brisket.
I have watched the indigenous people near 'Jake's' Deli on North Av in Milwaukee specifically ask for brisket with the fat on. I tried it and it's really good!-Dick

Edited by budrichard, 25 December 2003 - 05:27 AM.


#57 howard88

howard88
  • participating member
  • 356 posts

Posted 25 December 2003 - 03:19 PM

Gotta tell ya. I am a major consumer of corned beef and brisket all my life. The first cut in my humble opinon is a recipe for disaster. First cut = saw dust. Get either the whole brisket or second cut with plenty of fat and cook it slow and low or in one of them bags. The first cut brisket with no fat whatsover is what all the markets I venture into have. It came about from all the older women who talk to deli men and butchers. They say I want brisket or corned beef without the fat because my husband has a heart condition and cannot take eat the fatty stuff. I say let them eat something tasty and die happy.

#58 wesza

wesza
  • participating member
  • 1,103 posts
  • Location:Seattle, Wa.

Posted 25 December 2003 - 11:21 PM

Don't sear! The crust formed will inhibit moisture transfer into the meat which is what you want to keep it tender.
Quite frankly I believe that you are wasting your time by your method.
We either slow smoke on a Weber(it can be done) with a dry rub with a whole briket with fat cap or brine with spices and saltpeter for a month and then cook ala corned beef.
If you must do it in an oven, I would dry rub for a couple of days, add a little liquid smoke and then put into a braising liquid(beer) and into the oven for a slow cook.-Fat cap, low heat and moisture are the keys to good brisket.
I have watched the indigenous people near 'Jake's' Deli on North Av in Milwaukee specifically ask for brisket with the fat on. I tried it and it's really good!-Dick

budrichard: I agree that the Searing is not necesarry. However the poster that I responded to had requested that the Brisket have a Seared Exterior, that is may peoples preference.

Since the amount of time I had recommended searing wasn't long enough with any home Broiler to actually Char the Meat it would not have signifiently effected the absorbtion of the moisture as it may do in a open smoker, since there was always a moisture base during the entire cooking process.

The Dry Rubbing or Brine Soaking Methods of seasoning are only applicable if you wish to obtain a certain finish or taste to the Brisket.

I advised the party preparing the Brisket to season according to her own taste as well as suggested how she should utilize the liquid smoke application while reinterating that the outside would be as she wished.

Her response was that it was the best Brisket they'd ever eaten. The other responses were all very enthusiastic about the results.

I hope that someday i'll have the opportunity to enjoy a Brisket that you've prepared as it seems to be a labor of love that matches my love of eating. Having had the opportunity to Judge many competitions I still enjoy every chance to indulge in well smoked foods.

Irwin

Irwin
I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

#59 Huevos del Toro

Huevos del Toro
  • participating member
  • 388 posts
  • Location:Dallas, Texas

Posted 26 December 2003 - 02:12 PM

Cut & Paste is again something beyond my expertise.

Crtl "C" is copy. Ctrl "X" is cut, Ctrl "V" is paste. Just highlight what you want, then use the Control keys. That puts it into the invisible clipboard. Then you can paste it anywhere you want. It's one of my mainstays.
--------------
Bob Bowen
aka Huevos del Toro

#60 Msk

Msk
  • participating member
  • 352 posts

Posted 22 January 2004 - 04:11 PM

OK these suggestions all look great. Irwin, your suggested process is exactly the type I am looking for. I will be trying this again this weekend.

Does "Top Cut" = "Second cut" = " Top of the rib"? I think so but I'm just making sure.

So I should not sauce this until I have sliced the brisket after it has set? I plan to use a BBQ/Cayenne pepper sauce combination.

Wow 215 F internal temp, most other stuff I see says 180-195F, well I'll give it a go.

If I can't get this to work, then the next stof is the baking bag technique. Initially I thought it was going to be this go around but this technique seems promising.

Ill take pictures and post the results. Thanks alot.

Msk





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Charcuterie