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Smoking Brisket: The Topic

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#1 Dave the Cook

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 11:20 AM

The middle child has been yammering all summer for "brisket like we used to get in Texas."

I don't have a smoker, but I've got a reasonably-sized (~ 22" x 36") grill. I'm pretty accomplished at ribs and chicken and the usual stuff, but I've never done a big hunk of meat on the grill, and I've never cooked fresh brisket in any form.

Make my little girl happy and pass along some tips--I know there's some heavy smokers out there.

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#2 Jaymes

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 11:25 AM

If I were you, I'd try to get an emergency PM to Klink. :biggrin:

#3 Jason Perlow

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 11:28 AM

If I were you, I'd try to get an emergency PM to Klink. :biggrin:

Zactly. Klink knows smoke.
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#4 ChefJeff

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 12:15 PM

You don't need a smoker to have a good Brisket BBQ. Don't get me wrong, I have a weber bullet and love smoking....but the following recipe has won raves for BBQ. Lifted from the Allrecipes paperback.

Ingredients
4 pounds lean beef brisket
2 tablespoons liquid smoke flavoring
1 tablespoon onion salt
1 tablespoon garlic salt

1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 cup ketchup
3 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup water
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
1 tablespoon liquid smoke flavoring
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons mustard powder
salt and pepper to taste


Directions
1 Pour liquid smoke over brisket. Rub with onion salt and garlic salt. Roll brisket in foil and refrigerate at least overnight. 2 days is even better.
2 Preheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). Place brisket in a large roasting pan. Cover and bake for 5 to 6 hours. Remove from oven, cool, and then slice. Put slices back into pan.
3 In a medium saucepan, combine brown sugar, ketchup, butter, water, celery salt, liquid smoke, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, salt and pepper. Stir, and cook until boiling.
4 Pour sauce over meat slices in pan. Cover and bake for 1 more hour.

#5 Dana

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 12:35 PM

Here's what we do:

Build a good charcoal fire in your grill on one side of the fire pit. When the coals are gray, put the well-seasoned brisket on the OTHER side of the grill, away from the coals. Put the lid on and don't mess with it for 2 -3 hours or until the coals die out. Romove the meat from the grill and place it in a cake or other type of roasting pan (depending on the size of your brisket, you don't want a lot of extra room in the pan). Cover with foil tightly and bake in a slow oven (250) for 3 or so more hours. Remove and let cool and slice. If you want it sauced, pour your favorite over the slices and GENTLY reheat. This method will give you a good smokey flavor and the meat will be tender (which is a problem with brisket).

Good Luck
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#6 Double 0

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 12:53 PM

The only addition to the two previous posts is to get a whole brisket (6-10 lbs) and have butcher only trim the outside fat to about an 1/8 in. DO NOT SPLIT OR HAVE THE BUTCHER TRIM ANY OF THE INTERIOR FAT. Thats what makes the brisket tender.
I'm a NYC expat. Since coming to the darkside, as many of my freinds have said, I've found that most good things in NYC are made in NJ.

#7 Dave the Cook

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 12:55 PM

ChefJeff: Thanks. This is my fallback plan. In fact, I've done pork shoulder in an almost identical manner. It's great shredded, stuffed into soft rolls with a little sauce, wrapped in foil and stuck in the jacket pocket for retrieval about halfway through the second quarter of Saturday's football game (not receommended if you're actually playing).

Dana: do you use hardwood charcoal, briquets, or a combination? Do you pay much attention to temperature, or just wing it because it always turns out good anyway?

(8^D

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#8 CathyL

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 12:58 PM

Dave, get an untrimmed brisket, ideally about 8-9 pounds. Trim off some of the fat but leave at least 1/4" layer. Apply a dry rub the day (or several hours) before cooking if you like, or stick with salt and pepper.

Build a small fire on one side of your grilll. Add a few chunks of smoking wood - I much prefer oak to mesquite, but I'm not from Texas.

Put the meat on the other side of the grill, fat side up. You want to cook the brisket by convection - i.e., hot smoky air - rather than by radiant heat.

If you're using briquets rather than lump charcoal, keep a chimneyful of glowing coals to add as the first load burns down. Keep the temperature at grill level around 225-250 degrees but don't worry about a few spikes or dips.

You can add additional smoking wood, but once the meat's exterior hits about 140 degrees it won't absorb much more smoke flavor.

The time it will take to become tender depends on many factors, but allow yourself a good 15 hours. I judge more by texture than by temperature; if you stick a fork in the flat (not the point) and it slips out easily, it's done. The internal temp will probably be in the 180 range.

If it's done before you're ready to serve, wrap it in foil and stash it in a picnic cooler; it will stay hot for hours that way. Make sure to slice across the grain.

Hope this helps; ask more questions or PM me if you like. Or just wait for Col. Klink to show up. :biggrin:

#9 Dana

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 01:26 PM

We use good-quality briquets, but NEVER use that lighter fluid. Use a chimney starter or your food will taste like petroleum. I didn't have very good luck when I tried the charcoal-maybe I got a bad bag. Also, it's very humid here, maybe the charcoal got damp or something. Anyway, we don't worry too much about the temp. When you first put the meat on, the temp will be 325-350, and will slowly go down. When it gets to about 200 is when I take it off and put it in the oven. Mostly, I don't worry too much about it - it turns out good anyway.
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#10 Dave the Cook

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 01:42 PM

once the meat's exterior hits about 140 degrees it won't absorb much more smoke flavor.

The time it will take to become tender depends on many factors, but allow yourself a good 15 hours.  I judge more by texture than by temperature; if you stick a fork in the flat (not the point) and it slips out easily, it's done.  The internal temp will probably be in the 180 range.

Cathy: can you confirm that 140 degrees is the external temperature? It seems like it would reach this pretty fast. And if it stops absorbing smoke at this point, is there any reason not to move the brisket to the oven, like Dana suggests? (A reason, of course, besides the extended opportunity for traditional alcoholic beverage consumption that attends the keeping of a fire.)

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#11 col klink

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 01:43 PM

OK, I finally got out of bed today.

2 tablespoons liquid smoke flavoring

Sorry ChefJeff, but*shudder*.

If you only have an oven, take this approach or find somebody with a smoker. Preferably the latter. You might check local butchers who do their own sausages and smoke them. Tell them you're predicament and I'm sure they'd be happy to throw your brisket in the next time they put it to use. If your daughter wants brisket like she had in Texas, she won't like the oven method.

Dave, since you have a grill, you can do it yourself. What kind of grill do you have? You mentioned rectangular dimensions so I hope it's not a gas grill. If it takes coals, you're in luck. Follow CathyL's suggestions to a T and you'll be happy. Use the lump charcoal if you can, it'll burn hotter (meaning you don't need as much and it'll be easier to control) and it will leave far less ash residue. Regardless of which type of coals you use, always use wood chips. If you don't, the brisket will only taste like you grilled it. One thing to be aware of, when you smoke with chips, you don't get nearly the amount of smoke flavor that you do with all-wood fires so use the most pungent wood available which is either mesquite or hickory. Though using oak there's less likely a chance for acrid flavors and it'll be more authentic since the preferred wood for brisket in Texas is post oak. Oh yeah, if you don't see smoke coming out of your grill, you're not smoking it, put more chips on!

If it is a gas grill, it's going to be tough but it may be possible to get a decent result. The biggest problem with gas grills is they require a lot of air flow to feed the propane so as soon as you get a decent amount of smoke, it's out the back without a chance to jump into the meat. Plus, it's a pain in the ass to refill the wood chips and to smoke properly. Since brisket takes such a long time, you'll go through most of a tank in one sitting so I would suggest using Dana's method of smoking for 2 to 3 hours and finishing it in the oven. For the trip on the gas grill, let the temp get up to 275F or higher, it'll crisp the edges and give the meat more depth. Once it's in the oven, you're not going to get any more smoke flavor. Make sure that you know your oven's characteristics before letting it go all night long, you don't want to wake up to a briquette!

Whichever way you cook the brisket, definitely dry rub it for a day or two with any commercial rub or your own. I've liked making my own rubs ever since I found a place that sells bulk spices for pennies on the dollar (don't worry, they import for most of the city). On my briskets, I like to leave as much fat on as I can get. After a good smoking, it's like butter and lets the brisket basically be self-mopping. If there isn't a decent fat pack, you'll have to mop it. I like to use a spicy mustard vinaigrette but use whatever suits your fancy, just don't add any sugar because it will burn. After you pull it off, or a half hour before hand is when you can put on a sauce with sugar. I just use the mop and let other people put on a sauce if they like. Mopping is always a good idea for the tip portion as it normally doesn't have a fat pack and is the thinest portion of the meat but if you're going to mop the tip, you should mop the rest for consistency.

Dave, you didn't mention where you live but since you're no longer in Texas, it will probably be difficult to find a whole untrimmed brisket and if you do, it won't be $2/lb. I'm in Seattle and regardless of the size, I'm paying over $4/lb. If you don't have 15 hours to spare smoking, a smaller 3 to 4lb brisket is going to taste just as good as a large one (if the smoking style is sufficient) and it'll only take 6 hours to smoke. A 2lb section of brisket (try not to get the tip, it's leaner) can be done in 4 hours. Any less time than that and it'll be tough.

There's one other way to do brisket that's also very true to Texan roots, use a pit. If you have a back yard, dig a pit and line the perimeter with bricks or stones. A 5 foot diameter should be plenty big enough if you're not doing a whole untrimmed brisket, but you'll do just fine with a 3 foot pit. You'll also need a spot close by for a fire. Basically the technique is to burn the wood down (preferrably oak or post oak) to the 2" to 3" coal stage and then shovel the coals in to the pit. The grill should be placed 18" above the coals. Use the same times as for smoking and you'll definitely impress the whole neighborhood. This is also a great way to 'que up pork ribs and any other 'que you've had in Texas. If you're going to try poultry, I'd cut the backs out so they can lie flat, you'll get more even cooking. And of course, don't forget to brine the birds. For only maybe $10 - $20 in materials, you can authentic Texan bbq in a pit versus hundreds with a smoker.

Good luck! I know your daughter's love for brisket. I love all sorts of smoked meat, but I only get the shakes for brisket.

#12 Dana

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 02:01 PM

I TOTALLY forgot about the wood chips - or chunks. Soak them in water for at LEAST 30 min before putting in the fire - longer is better - more smoke.
You can get some at WalMart, either hickory or mesquite. We love both.

I also TOTALLY agree about the liquid smoke. EEEWWW - more petroleum
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#13 CathyL

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 02:17 PM

Cathy: can you confirm that 140 degrees is the external temperature? It seems like it would reach this pretty fast. And if it stops absorbing smoke at this point, is there any reason not to move the brisket to the oven, like Dana suggests? (A reason, of course, besides the extended opportunity for traditional alcoholic beverage consumption that attends the keeping of a fire.)

Yes, 140 external. I usually put chilled meat on the smoker and start out with a grill temp of under 200, running it up over the first hour or so, for a little more smoke action.

No real reason not to finish it in the oven, except for the traditional alcoholic beverage consumption part. I never wrap brisket in foil but I know a lot of real-by-god Texans do.

Dana, I don't soak wood chunks - if the fire is low enough they smolder without bursting into flames.

#14 MaggieW

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 02:21 PM

Klink, you are a god. :biggrin:

#15 haunted_chef

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 02:46 PM

Dave,

I suggest the oven method if you don't have a smoker. Trying to keep the Temp. at a high and even pace for 6 to 8 hours can be a challenge if you only have a pit. It also depends on the size of the brisket your using, you dont want to toss a whole brisket in the lil webber. there are smaller cuts that you can obtain from the market. hope it goes well....


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#16 Dave the Cook

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 03:02 PM

Thanks everybody--a lot of great information.

Charcoal grill--Check. It's a serious grill that I bought to handle burgers and dogs for the hordes at swimming meets over the summer. The construction details are not as nice as a Weber, but it has the things I think are important (I'd welcome critique here): adjustable charcoal pan, adjustable vents top and bottom, cast-iron grates, work space. John: You seem concerned about the lack of a dedicated smoker. Does this grill sound workable to you?

Charcoal--Check. I've got lots of oak charcoal, and some sugar maple I got on special at Whole Foods, but I save that for pork.

Rub--Check. I do my own for steaks, ribs, chicken. Do you expect any penetration from the rub, or is it mostly a crust/aroma thing?

Wood chips--check. In doing back ribs (about four hours), I find that mesquite gets unpleasantly pungent, so I'll go for hickory.

Fat cap--check/Internal trimming verboten--check.

Pit--not unless I want the Neighborhood Nazis knocking on my door.:unsure:

It sounds like the biggest challenge is maintaining the temperature: too high and you cook it before you get it smoked, too low and it never gets done. Any pointers here?

Klink, you are a god. And CathyL, you may be a goddess.

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#17 Double 0

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 03:18 PM

I use a regular oven thermometer (good quality) right on the grill next to the meat, and I like one of those new wireless internal thermometer for checking the meat.
I'm a NYC expat. Since coming to the darkside, as many of my freinds have said, I've found that most good things in NYC are made in NJ.

#18 col klink

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 03:36 PM

Charcoal grill--Check. It's a serious grill that I bought to handle burgers and dogs for the hordes at swimming meets over the summer. The construction details are not as nice as a Weber, but it has the things I think are important (I'd welcome critique here): adjustable charcoal pan, adjustable vents top and bottom, cast-iron grates, work space. John: You seem concerned about the lack of a dedicated smoker. Does this grill sound workable to you?

It sounds like the biggest challenge is maintaining the temperature: too high and you cook it before you get it smoked, too low and it never gets done. Any pointers here?


Don't start calling me a god yet, I forgot to mention something that helps out a lot. Use a water pan beneath brisket. Check it every hour or so to make sure the water doesn't completely evaporate. This will help your brisket from drying out and as a large heat mass, it will stabilize the temperature of your grill. Also, they will collect the grease and excess mop/sauce from soiling your grill.

Now as for controlling the temp. Get a water pan, one half the size of your grill. You place this on the charcoal pan under the meat. You mention that your grill has vents, both below and above. I'm guessing that there are vents on both sides of the grill, if that's so, here's what I'd do. On the fire side, open the vent below and close the vent above and the opposite on the meat side. That way air comes in to stoke the fire and the smoke is forced out by the meat. At first, open both vents and see what the temperature comes from that. Make sure to rotate your bisket about every half hour, though you're cooking indirectly, there will be a temperature gradient throughout the grill and you don't want any one side to be neglected. You should sit by the grill the first couple of times you smoke and after a while you'll get a feel for how things are going. Give each adjustment about 10 to 15 minutes for affect to have a change. Oh yeah, use about half of a chimney's amount for the start. If you having a difficult time getting the grill up to temp, just start some more. That's a lot easier than trying to cool down the smoker. If you don't have a chimney, get one. They're indispensible.

I'm so glad to hear that your grill is not a gas. They can be nice, but if you want to eat your food, don't use them. They're only for convenience. Your grill sounds great and sounds very similar to my smoker except that I have a side firebox. I simply adore my cast iron grates. John wasn't concerned about your grill keeping temp, he was concerned about keeping a steady temperature if you use a pit since pits aren't closed containers and you have to deal with the weather far more than a grill or smoker. You don't have to worry about that since the neighborhood nazi's have already scared you.

I can tell from everything else you posted, that you're already half there to making a good brisket. When you buy your brisket, don't get one that's larger than half of your grill size. As for rubs, you're not going to get very much penetration, but they'll add a lot of flavor to the crust. As for you pork, both ribs and roasts, if you're not brining them, you're really missing out. That's the one thing that the bbq joints don't do that you can do and it'll make your 'que better than theirs.

We've had discussions about brining here (click me).

#19 Dave the Cook

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 03:56 PM

OK, you're a demigod.

I had planned to use a foil pan under the brisket, but I hadn't thought about putting water in it, though for some reason, I always think about it when I take ribs off the grill. Then I forget about it until I'm done with the next batch. Using it as a thermal buffer is very clever. Makes one wonder if a few well-placed bricks would help stabilize the temperature. That's sort of what a brick pit does, isn't it?

I'm on board with chimneys--but the tip of starting with half a load is helpful. Obvious when you think about it, but I hadn't.

I'm also on board with brining, but I'm always looking for new information. Thanks for the link.

And the link to the Char-Griller was particularly spooky, as that is the grill that I have, too. I simply haven't gotten around to buying the side box yet. Glad to know you consider it a good purchase.

And don't laugh about the NN's. Last year we had to pay a $300 fine for cutting down a tree without their permission.

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#20 col klink

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 04:24 PM

I thought that you might have that grill, it's relatively inexpensive and pretty damn good. If you do go ahead and get the side fire box, within a 10 to 15 uses, you'll have to replace the fire grate because is uses the standard wire used in webber grills which cannot withstand the heat of a wood fire. I had a buddy of mine take off the original and weld on rebar in 1" spacing and it's been working like a charm ever since. I would try and get a deal from Chargriller if you do decide to get the firebox (do it! you'll never go back!!!). The side fire box is their smallest grill and yes, you could order that, but you don't need the extra legs that come with it, just tell them you want to upgrade and they can probably help you out. They seemed pretty nice on the phone when I talked to them and I can't imagine you'd be the first person to ask for the upgrade. Sorry to hear about your NN's! I heard some horrible stories from certain neighborhoods so I know how bad it can possible get. That $300 fine though is absolutely absurb, they're drunk on their own power. Small petty people. Did you save the tree for firewood?

#21 haunted_chef

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 05:40 PM

Dave,

May I recommend this web site to you, its by the great Smokey Hale. he's a bbq'in, Smokin guru....You will find a lot of information about smokin with all types of grills as well as the big smokers. If you have any questions you can e-mail smokey direct from the site. If your really into bbq'in you can subscribe to the newsletter as well.



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#22 Jaymes

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 06:23 PM

Don't start calling me a god yet...

Okay, so you're a lord - the Lord of the Smoke.

And Cathy, I'm darn impressed. Rubs even. Okay, you can be the Lady of the Smoke.

And just as Klink suggests, we'll wait to deify you. :biggrin:

Klink - you'll let us know when???

:unsure:

#23 Nick

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 07:00 PM

If you want to get really serious about pit smoking, check out Dave Klose' site BBQ Pits

Spent quite awhile on the phone with him one day last summer and he's quite a man.

Made a post about this on a different site and got this post in return -

"He not only sells some damned good pits (I own one), but he's one hell of a storyteller. One night at a bar in Carlsbad, he had a whole table of 'Qers laughing so hard they couldn't sit straight. That's about all I remember about that evening, along with marvelling at the man's alcohol tolerance. Just a little fella (around 5'10" or so) with two hollow legs. Hell, he was even buying most of the drinks! What a guy!!"

#24 Dave the Cook

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 08:35 PM

Colonel:

Thanks for all the advice. I'll call Char-Grill next week and give them the upgrade pitch. Are you saying that the firebox is simply another grill that gets grafted onto the firebox of the bigger grill? Very clever.

I found a six-pound hunk of brisket at Costco for $2.69/lb., so I'm pretty pleased. I'll give it a rub tonight and throw it on the grill Sunday. Do you want a report?

John and Nick: thanks for the new sites. I've heard of both gentlemen, but hadn't had a chance to track down their web-based whereabouts.

btw, we kept the wood, but not for a fire--it was Southern pine, and not really suitable for anything but mulch, and that only in certain beds (very acid). The rule was that anything over 4 inches in diameter was protected by the neighborhood covenants. This is an absurd rule, because a Southern pine will grow from a seedling to four inches in two years or less--they're like weeds here in Atlanta. The rule is designed to maintain a certain greenspace, and in particular protect hardwoods, of course (I am in complete agreement with this, actually), but we got caught taking out a tree that we were afraid would fall on the house in the next ice storm. Later, with permission, we cut down a lightning-struck oak, but it had gotten infested. Such is life in the 'burbs.

Thanks again, everybody.

(8^Dave

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#25 CathyL

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Posted 18 October 2002 - 09:41 PM

Colonel, why put a water pan under the meat unless you have a fire under the meat?

Dave, I am indeed a goddess, and I thank you for mentioning it.

#26 col klink

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Posted 19 October 2002 - 12:22 PM

A number of reasons. Like I said above, first and foremost it helps keep the meat moist. Second, it catches the drippings. Last but not least, it acts at a temperature stablizer. If you open the smoker, obviously that will let heat out but it hardly takes any time to get back up to temp because the water heats the air. Likewise, if the fire gets too hot, it has to heat up the water too for the overall temp to rise. It basically acts like a shock absorber. As Dave mentioned, adding bricks to the smoker will also help stabilize the temp.

Dave, great to hear you have good access to brisket, and please do give a report on how your first one goes.

Jaymes, when I can walk on water, I'll let you know! :smile:

#27 haunted_chef

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Posted 19 October 2002 - 03:26 PM

Dave,


Just a quick reminder incase you don't already know....NEVER use pine wood in your pit!!!!!!


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#28 Jinmyo

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Posted 19 October 2002 - 04:40 PM

Klink is so dreamy. :wub: :wub: :wub:
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

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#29 col klink

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Posted 01 May 2003 - 03:06 PM

I recently received a question about brisket that I don't believe has been addressed before so I'll post about it here.

when you buy a whole brisket in cryovac, do you trim any of the fat (including the pretty hard line of fat)?  Do you separate it into point and blade?  (Whatever the hell that is.)


Whole briskets come in sizes between 10 - 14lbs and they're considered "untrimmed." The pointy end is called the "point" and is about twice as thick as the "flat" end. Most sources will tell you to trim the excess fat and leave within 1/8" to 1/4". I however don't trim any of the fat off. If somebody doesn't want the fat, I'll let them trim it off after I smoke it because if I trim it, it'll be more likely to dry out. Most sources don't even mention the point so I assume they toss it. Me? The point is my favorite part. It's positively riddled with fat but after it's been smoked it has lost more than half it's weight leaving behind the juiciest and most tender part of the brisket. What I find deplorable is that some sources say to trim off the fat after it's been smoked. That's where all the flavor is!!! It's not like chewing on gristle but it alsmost is as soft as butter but 10 times tastier.

As for the point and the flat, yes I usually do cut the brisket up. For big parties I normally don't cut it up and leave it whole, but that takes 10 to 14 hours to smoke. So most of the time I do cut it up into about 3 or 4 pieces. This way the brisket will smoke in about 6 or 7 hours and will end up being smokier. It also smokes the point more evenly and gives you more control over smoking the flat which is far leaner, allowing you to pull it off earlier.

#30 Marlene

Marlene
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  • 8,123 posts
  • Location:Alberta, Canada

Posted 01 May 2003 - 03:35 PM

You don't need a smoker to have a good Brisket BBQ.  Don't get me wrong, I have a weber bullet and love smoking....but the following recipe has won raves for BBQ.  Lifted from the Allrecipes paperback.

Ingredients   
4 pounds lean beef brisket
2 tablespoons liquid smoke flavoring
1 tablespoon onion salt
1 tablespoon garlic salt
 
1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 cup ketchup
3 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup water
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
1 tablespoon liquid smoke flavoring
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons mustard powder
salt and pepper to taste


Directions   
1 Pour liquid smoke over brisket. Rub with onion salt and garlic salt. Roll brisket in foil and refrigerate at least overnight.  2 days is even better.
2 Preheat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C). Place brisket in a large roasting pan. Cover and bake for 5 to 6 hours. Remove from oven, cool, and then slice. Put slices back into pan.
3 In a medium saucepan, combine brown sugar, ketchup, butter, water, celery salt, liquid smoke, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, salt and pepper. Stir, and cook until boiling.
4 Pour sauce over meat slices in pan. Cover and bake for 1 more hour.

Is this "lifted" directly from the book? If so, it may be a problem with our Copyright policy. If you've changed it enough to post it here, let me know and we will put it in the archive.

Thanks! :biggrin:
Marlene
cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Charcuterie