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Let's See Your Teaware!


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168 replies to this topic

#151 Wholemeal Crank

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 09:02 AM

So simple, but it does look right: thicker areas are whiter.

It's just fantastic the way basic chemistry and physics result in such glorious variety in ceramics.

#152 haresfur

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 03:47 PM

A nuance of some shino glazes is that the recipe includes soda ash (sodium carbonate), which is soluble. It soaks into the clay and forms a sheen around the glazed areas. I don't think most Japanese shino uses it. It also means that you are usually screwed if you mess up glazing because it never seems to wash off properly.

Your pots are amazing WC. You have a real eye and thanks for sharing them.
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#153 Will

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 05:38 PM

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#154 Wholemeal Crank

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 06:07 PM

A very contented looking collection. I'm guessing they all get use with different teas, or different numbers of guests, so there's no jealousy in the ranks?

#155 Will

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 07:07 PM

A very contented looking collection. I'm guessing they all get use with different teas, or different numbers of guests, so there's no jealousy in the ranks?

Well, the ones at work get a lot more action, since I rarely drink tea at home during the week. So some of the pots don't see a lot of use. But I do have bigger and smaller pots, depending on how many people I'm brewing for. Many of the smallest pots end up at work, because I'm almost always drinking alone there.

#156 Wholemeal Crank

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 08:56 PM

Another new cup arrived today, almost the last of a recent buying spree:

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How does that delicate blue glaze transform the strong red-orange clay into gray granite with a tracery of blue over it?

#157 haresfur

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 02:33 AM

How does that delicate blue glaze transform the strong red-orange clay into gray granite with a tracery of blue over it?

Grey is the colour of the reduced clay body. The red-orange on the foot is where the clay reoxidizes during cooling. If you've ever chipped the foot on a cup, you've probably seen the clay is grey, too. After the glaze melts it seals over the clay and keeps it from reoxidizing. So the blue isn't so delicate - it forms a pretty tough shell.

I don't really understand the reoxidation. You don't get the same beautiful toasty colour if you fire completely in pure oxidation. Guess I should read up on that.
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#158 Wholemeal Crank

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 09:51 AM

Grey is the colour of the reduced clay body. The red-orange on the foot is where the clay reoxidizes during cooling. If you've ever chipped the foot on a cup, you've probably seen the clay is grey, too.


That makes perfect sense, thanks. I'll trust your explanation and hope I don't have a chance to confirm it through a close encounter of the breakage kind.

#159 Wholemeal Crank

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 06:22 PM

Got a couple of pieces whose shipment was delayed, and now have a full set of teawares from Petr Novak:

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I brewed up the Zhejiang green tea from Norbu that I've been raving about in this shibo, and it was fantastic. I brewed it next in a tokoname kyusu (long used for sencha, but switched to a variety of green teas after the new kyusu arrived), and wasn't quite as impressed--still a very good tea, but not a transcendent experience. Finished the sample with another infusion in the shibo again, and it was again fantastic. The iron-rich clay does seem to sweeten and enhance the tea brewed in it quite dramatically.

Also got a couple of nice little (4-5 oz size) teacups from Michael Coffee (shyrabbit on etsy)

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I manage to enjoy my teas even when I have to drink them from a plastic thermos bottle-cap, but they're definitely more fun when brewed and sipped from things like this.

#160 Hassouni

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 05:35 PM

Got my new kyusu in from ryu-mei.com, who offer anything from the Tokoname catalog direct from Japan, so here it is, a 320 cc plain unglazed kyusu with sasame.

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Seems made well, very understated and nice. The pour is very smooth, as is the resulting tea - my Ito En ichibantsumi sencha has zero bitterness and only barely detectable astringency after the inaugural steeping. Very pleased!

I know it's only 320ml but this thing is TINY! Here it is next to my phone:
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Filled to the top, its enough to fill a mug to the lip, but I hear the kyusu experts here recommend not filling the teapot up all the way. Why is that?

Also, I got this to use with sencha, and it's unglazed. Any other teas I can use with it without offsetting the flavors, or should I just stick to sencha?

Edited by Hassouni, 02 December 2011 - 05:36 PM.


#161 Wholemeal Crank

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 04:39 PM

That's a lovely kyusu. If you avoid filling it entirely to the top, it's easier to pour out the tea without having the spout clog up and the pour slow as quickly (despite the sasame filter, slow pour still happens).

I occasionally use my unglazed kyusus for other green teas, but would avoid anything farther off in flavor profile than straightforward greens or mellow white teas (silver needle but not Bai Mu Dan), certainly no oolongs, puerhs, black teas.

#162 Richard Kilgore

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 06:03 PM

Very nice Tokonome, Hassouni. Are you sure it's unglazed? The glossy surface reflections made me ask.

#163 Richard Kilgore

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 06:03 PM

Very nice Tokonome, Hassouni. Are you sure it's unglazed? The glossy surface reflections made me ask.

#164 Hassouni

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 06:46 PM

Very nice Tokonome, Hassouni. Are you sure it's unglazed? The glossy surface reflections made me ask.


If you're referring to the inside of the pot, it's glossy because I had just rinsed it out to remove any packing/workshop dust, etc. When dry it has a somewhat matte appearance - not rough, but definitely not shiny.

#165 Wholemeal Crank

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 09:43 PM

Some new teawares acquired over the past six months or so....

a summer galaxy glaze guinomi by Tetsuako Nakao

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a Michael Coffee yunomi with black tenmoku and nuka glaze

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I inherited this 'yixing' set with a giant (600mL!) dragon teapot

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I found it among my father's belongings while cleaning out the clutter in his study.

the dragon theme is pretty cool.

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And a 'steel glaze' guinomi by Toshiyuki Suzuki

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#166 Hassouni

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 10:31 PM

the Michael Coffee yunomi with black tenmoku and nuka glaze is superb

#167 Wholemeal Crank

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 10:46 PM

I had already bought too much teaware recently, and was trying not to buy more when I saw that piece. I think I waited 3 or 4 days, half hoping someone else would buy it, but then justified the purchase by getting a second one as the perfect gift for a tea friend who did some petsitting for me. The deep blue on black is so rich and very hard to capture in a photo, because of the gloss of the glaze.

(BTW, he's got a fantastic larger bowl with the Tenmoku/Nuka combination on his Etsy site here that I have been trying not to buy for several months now.)

Edited by Wholemeal Crank, 08 January 2012 - 10:53 PM.


#168 threestars

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 07:00 AM

I like Kyushu! It looks really cute and design and material looks really great. :)

#169 goodkidwe

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 06:37 PM

I just found this thread and loved looking at all the tea items! Such lovely things! The appliances are amazing! Inever knew such things existed!! Thank you all!! I also got inspired...

Tea for one

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Separated:
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Small tea cup from waaaay back when!!

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Hungarian set

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More for coffee

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well known...

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Lovely tea cups and coffee cups. I love all of them!