Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Let's See Your Teaware!


  • Please log in to reply
168 replies to this topic

#91 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 15 December 2009 - 11:01 PM

Here are three Japanese houhin (or houbin) tea pots, each with about a 5 ounce capacity. They are designed for brewing gyokuro and high quality sencha, and each of these has at least a little wabi-sabi.


This one is a Bizen houhin, made about 1980 by the Japanese ceramic artist Shemeko Kaneda. It's beautiful, but is useless as a teapot due to dripping not just a little.
IMG_0216b.JPG

This is a Shigaraki houhin, made in recent years by the Japanese ceramic artist Takahashi Rakusai.
IMG_0202b.JPG

And this one is a Hagi houhin, made in the late 1950s or early 1960s, signed but I have not been able to identify the artist.
IMG_0226b.JPG

#92 Wholemeal Crank

Wholemeal Crank
  • participating member
  • 1,653 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, CA

Posted 15 December 2009 - 11:09 PM

do any of these use a built-in or a inserted strainer? or do you simply hope the leaves sink by the time you're pouring that first cup?

#93 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 15 December 2009 - 11:16 PM

All three have spouts with multiple holes on the inside of the pot. The holes are flush with the side of the pot. No metal screens. I'll take more pictures in coming weeks and show these houhin from more angles and the interiors.

#94 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 15 December 2009 - 11:28 PM

I should add that I have learned to pour very slowly and now never get a serious clog unless I am not paying attention and rush. 99% of the time it goes very smoothly.

The other houhin I have (not pictured above), which came from yuuki-cha.com, has a ss screen that also works very well, but you still have to pour more slowly than you do with Yixings and gaiwan. Houhin of any type are very hard to find and this one is made of Banko clay that tends to smooth, integrate flavors and take the astringent edge off senchas and gyokuros. And it's inexpensive.

#95 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 22 January 2010 - 01:44 PM

This is a Taikai-Chaire Japanese tea caddy made by the ceramic artist Teiichi Okitani in Kyoto Prefecture, likely in the late 70's - early 80's. It is protected by a shifiku of silk and the wooden box signed by the artist.

IMG_0317.JPG

IMG_0318.JPG

IMG_0322_1.JPG

IMG_0324.JPG

#96 nakji

nakji
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,659 posts
  • Location:Shanghai

Posted 23 January 2010 - 07:04 PM

My teaware is far more pedestrian than the beautiful pieces in this topic. (Aside from my gaiwan, which I mainly like to look at) I use a plain white porcelain Muji teapot with inset mesh infuser for all of my teas - oolongs, mugichas, nokchas - the lot. I prefer drinking from a Japanese-style teacup (yunomi), and have a small collection - my every day ones, which are also from Muji and match my dishes, but a couple of handmade ones from local potters as well. They're good for warming up your hands this time of year.

I also have two tea caddies - a stainless steel one for Japanese teas, and a porcelain one I bought from a housewares design shop in Shanghai. Neither are particularly traditional, but I do like the way they look on my kitchen counter!

#97 gingko

gingko
  • participating member
  • 17 posts

Posted 23 January 2010 - 07:05 PM

This is a Kuromatsu Tokoname teapot made by Tokoname craftsman Gyokko that I got from Yuuki-cha.com. At a 120 ml capacity it is good for brewing about 60 - 90 ml of higher quality sencha or gyokuro. I love the texture of the unglazed clay.

Posted Image


Ha! I have this too :laugh: Although I seldom drink Japanese green tea, I just love this teapot so much. I use it for oolong and it drains water thoroughly between infusions. And the teapot just looks so pretty and feels so nice in hands!

#98 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 23 January 2010 - 09:26 PM

My teaware is far more pedestrian than the beautiful pieces in this topic. (Aside from my gaiwan, which I mainly like to look at) I use a plain white porcelain Muji teapot with inset mesh infuser for all of my teas - oolongs, mugichas, nokchas - the lot. I prefer drinking from a Japanese-style teacup (yunomi), and have a small collection - my every day ones, which are also from Muji and match my dishes, but a couple of handmade ones from local potters as well. They're good for warming up your hands this time of year.

I also have two tea caddies - a stainless steel one for Japanese teas, and a porcelain one I bought from a housewares design shop in Shanghai. Neither are particularly traditional, but I do like the way they look on my kitchen counter!


I would really be interested in seeing pics of all of these when you have time, Erin.

#99 Wholemeal Crank

Wholemeal Crank
  • participating member
  • 1,653 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, CA

Posted 24 January 2010 - 04:03 PM

Finally saw some really small gaiwans yesterday at Wing Hop Fung. The smaller standard ones like those I already have hold between 2 and 3 ounces; these smaller ones came with travel tea kits including a small padded zippered case, 4 impossibly tiny teacups holding maybe 15-20 mL, and the gaiwans looked to hold about 40mL. They didn't have separate bases for the gaiwans.

These are the size I was looking for for comparative tastings of oolongs or puerhs where I want to sample many infusions of 2-4 teas at a time, but it feels very wasteful to buy the whole travel kit (admittedly cheap enough at $10.99) when I just want the little gaiwans. In time, if I don't find another source, I'll probably cave in and buy a couple of sets of them. Maybe I'd be able to give the cups to someone whose doll could use them....

#100 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 24 January 2010 - 05:02 PM

This is one of a set of five Hagi yunomi made by the Japanese ceramic artist Shuho around 1980 in the Yamaguchi Prefecture. A good size for both sencha and gyokuro.

IMG_0338.JPG

IMG_0339.JPG

IMG_0341.JPG

#101 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 24 January 2010 - 08:10 PM

Finally saw some really small gaiwans yesterday at Wing Hop Fung. The smaller standard ones like those I already have hold between 2 and 3 ounces; these smaller ones came with travel tea kits including a small padded zippered case, 4 impossibly tiny teacups holding maybe 15-20 mL, and the gaiwans looked to hold about 40mL. They didn't have separate bases for the gaiwans.

These are the size I was looking for for comparative tastings of oolongs or puerhs where I want to sample many infusions of 2-4 teas at a time, but it feels very wasteful to buy the whole travel kit (admittedly cheap enough at $10.99) when I just want the little gaiwans. In time, if I don't find another source, I'll probably cave in and buy a couple of sets of them. Maybe I'd be able to give the cups to someone whose doll could use them....


That's an interesting option, but since you have some that hold 2 ounces, they aren't that great an advantage. Plus some leaf styles are going to be too big to fit when dry without breaking in a 40 ml gaiwan. But do take pics if you get a set or two.

#102 Wholemeal Crank

Wholemeal Crank
  • participating member
  • 1,653 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, CA

Posted 24 January 2010 - 09:17 PM

My smallest gaiwans actually hold between 75 and 80 mL filled to where the lid sits.

These small travel gaiwans looked about half their size. But I didn't bring a bottle of water and my pocket scale to verify....

#103 nakji

nakji
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,659 posts
  • Location:Shanghai

Posted 25 January 2010 - 03:17 AM

I've seen those travel kits in China, too. I've always wondered what kind of tea emergency would require a mini-gaiwan travel set.

Here are my daily pieces:2010 01 24 001.JPG

On the left is my stainless steel tea caddy, which I use for genmaicha. Just behind that is a porcelain caddy with a rubber seal that I use for my tie guan yin. In the middle is my favourite cup, a rough pottery piece I got at a local art shop. Next to that is my white porcelain yunomi that matches my dishes. On the far right is another yunomi that a Japanese friend gave me - it's smaller, and lightly glazed with a lavender wash. In the front are two traditional Vietnamese cups, which hold a lot less. I use them for during lessons - when out Mandarin tutor comes to the house, we always set out tea.

Here's my teapot:
2010 01 24 003.JPG

Nothing much fancy about it, which I like for daily use. The mesh insert will probably have to be replaced eventually, but other than that it works fine - no drips. I also use it brew my coffee in the morning (without the infuser). I just fit a coffee filter to the top and pour hot water in. It multi-tasks.

#104 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 27 January 2010 - 06:39 PM

Nice teawares, Erin. I particularly like your rough pottery yunomi and the two Vietnamese cups. The stainless tea caddy is good looking, too. Does it seal well?

#105 nakji

nakji
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,659 posts
  • Location:Shanghai

Posted 28 January 2010 - 07:01 AM

I'm not sure how it stands up to other tea caddies, Richard, but it does the job for me. My tea turns over pretty quick, though. The inside has an inset lid under the top that is machined to fit snugly inside. When you fit it in, there's a nice amount of air resistance that you can feel, so I suspect there's a pretty good seal.

I love my Vietnamese cups, too - the one with leaves on it has a crackle glaze and unusual maroon flowers that I particularly enjoy. I often make lemongrass tea for these cups.

#106 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 28 January 2010 - 11:50 AM

Your stainless caddy sounds better than most. I have never seen one here. Some teas can tolerate a tea caddy that is not well-sealed, but some deteriorate much, much faster in them. Your's would be perfect for Chinese or Japanese green teas. Or for many teas that one wanted to age for a few years.

#107 nakji

nakji
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,659 posts
  • Location:Shanghai

Posted 29 January 2010 - 04:43 AM

I'm ashamed to say that I store most of my tea in the cello bag it comes in, butterfly-clipped shut, and shoved in my top drawer at work. In the morning I dump out the wet leaves out of the mug from the night before, rinse the cup, sprinkle in new leaves, and pour hot water on them, grand-pa style. So I'm not particularly fussy when it comes to tea storage.

#108 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 29 January 2010 - 08:00 AM

Air, light and moisture being three of the four primary enemies of tea leaves, more of mine are stored in the dark zip bags they came in, than they are loose in tins. My wet leaves also often sit overnight, sometimes on purpose, sometimes not.

#109 Wholemeal Crank

Wholemeal Crank
  • participating member
  • 1,653 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, CA

Posted 28 February 2010 - 12:33 AM

Bought a couple of prettier tea pieces at the Korean tea shop today, and a couple of small things at the Wing Hop Fung too.

Posted Image
Celadon cup/infuser insert/lid set: the cup is big enough for my chasen, to use for matcha, if I can find one that I like.

Posted Image
Green gaiwan and drinking cup set

Posted Image
Mini-gong fu travel set--bought this because of the tiny gaiwan, holding just 45-50 mL apiece. I wanted the smaller gaiwans to be able to do gong fu tasting sessions comparing several different teas without drinking inordinate quantities of tea.

Posted Image
Mini-aroma cup set--the cup holds about one ounce.

Edited by Wholemeal Crank, 28 February 2010 - 12:33 AM.


#110 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 02 March 2010 - 07:03 PM

I really like your Korean celadon set, WmC. Attractive and practical. That may work well for gyokuro, as well as sencha, depending on the size. What's the capacity? The cup, though looks much too small for matcha. What are the dimensions?

#111 Wholemeal Crank

Wholemeal Crank
  • participating member
  • 1,653 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, CA

Posted 02 March 2010 - 09:26 PM

I checked and my chasen does fit into the celadon mug set. It holds 6 ounces, so big enough for a 3 ounce matcha session, which was the volume suggested by the Dens tea site, and will also serve for a general tea session. I like it enough that I'm tempted to get another one for work too, so I can have the pretty cup for drinking from my thermos in clinic, instead of the lid of my thermos, which is practical but not at all elegant.

The travel set is much smaller; per their web site it holds 3.5 oz. I expect to use it at work for my evening gong fu sessions while doing paperwork, when I don't have so many to share the tea with.

#112 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 02 March 2010 - 11:30 PM

Yes, it is the travel set I was referring to...very nice.

I'll be interested to hear about how the celadon mug works out as a substitute chawan. My hunch is it may be awkward to use due to the small capacity and the shape that curves inward from the side to the rim. I just measured my smallest chawan and it holds 13+ ounces to the rim, and I have not seen one smaller. But you may find a way to make it work.

#113 nakji

nakji
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,659 posts
  • Location:Shanghai

Posted 19 March 2010 - 10:26 PM

A student gave me this teapot as a thank-you gift for helping her with college applications. Since I didn't open the gift in front of her, I lost the opportunity to ask any her questions about it. It's clay, I think - it has a rough inside that holds 60 ml. There's an artist's stamp on the bottom; the inside is a light blonde colour clay that seems rather sandy. A google image search didn't turn up much else that looks like it. I haven't used it yet, but I have some oolong I could try in it.

Pot:
2010 03 20 004.JPG

Stamp:
2010 03 20 005.JPG

#114 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 21 March 2010 - 09:25 PM

That's an interesting looking tea pot, Erin. It may be better for display than brewing, however, since someone has smeared something (shoe polish is often used) to make it look old. It's not a Yixing, so no telling what is in the clay. May be fine, but I would not drink anything brewed in one like this. Still a kind gift and an interesting display piece. I once bought a fake Yixing knowingly; it had a similar treatment and have since used it as a model for the "how to avoid fakes" section of a talk on Yixing teapots.

#115 nakji

nakji
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,659 posts
  • Location:Shanghai

Posted 22 March 2010 - 01:46 AM

Thanks Richard. I knew it wasn't a Yixing, but had no idea what else it might be. I'll put it on my "objets" shelf for now, and read your section on Yixing pots. I'm thinking of getting another (smaller) gaiwan and a pot this month to up my game, so to speak.

#116 Wholemeal Crank

Wholemeal Crank
  • participating member
  • 1,653 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, CA

Posted 17 April 2010 - 09:41 PM

I just de-scaled my simplex kettle for the first time, after having it for about five months now. It got a short boil with a vinegar solution, some thorough rinsing, and a quick wipe with a clean dishtowel, and again it is brilliant and shiny and gorgeous. I am very happy with it.

#117 Wholemeal Crank

Wholemeal Crank
  • participating member
  • 1,653 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, CA

Posted 21 April 2010 - 09:37 AM

Got 2 new kyusus from tokoname.jp, and am currently enjoying my first morning sencha in the leaf pot:

Posted Image

It holds 5 oz water, stands on one handle, has a nice sasame screen, is shapely and pretty, and pours well.

And BTW, my simplex is so pretty that even the water drops that condensed on the edge of it form a beautiful pattern

Posted Image

#118 Richard Kilgore

Richard Kilgore
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,376 posts
  • Location:home, home on the range....

Posted 21 April 2010 - 05:10 PM

That's a beautiful Tokoname, WmC. A very useful size, too.

#119 Wholemeal Crank

Wholemeal Crank
  • participating member
  • 1,653 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, CA

Posted 22 April 2010 - 07:11 PM

The 2nd tokoname kyusu from the same order got baptized today with some sencha from denstea. Here's the pot itself:

Posted Image

I was a bit confused, thought it was plainer from from the picture in the catalog, and would prefer less frilly decoration. Still, it brews a sweet cup of sencha, stands on the handle, pours briskly and neatly. And both this one and the one I posted yesterday catch less of the leaf between the lid and the rim of the pot, probably some neater fitting there.

#120 LuckyGirl

LuckyGirl
  • participating member
  • 297 posts
  • Location:Greater Cleveland

Posted 25 April 2010 - 02:14 PM

Got 2 new kyusus from tokoname.jp, and am currently enjoying my first morning sencha in the leaf pot:

Posted Image

It holds 5 oz water, stands on one handle, has a nice sasame screen, is shapely and pretty, and pours well.

And BTW, my simplex is so pretty that even the water drops that condensed on the edge of it form a beautiful pattern

Posted Image


Funny how pretty those water marks are.