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Australian Imperial Measurement Conversion


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Kayakado

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 11:55 AM

Okay, I've searched the forums and found nothing but threads that are far too many pages to search for this little nugget of info to fix my problem. If only the search would bring you to the exact posting you need and not the whole thread - do I have something set incorrectly??

Enough whining - here's the problem...

I received an Australian cake book. It seems the Australians are the last few souls left on this earth who rely on Imperial measurements. I am okay with the dry measurement since it converts easily to weighing on a gram scale, but the liquid stuff that converts to milli liters of volume is confounding me, especially when I get to a cup or less. It would be great if I could weigh the liquids but I don't have the conversion for that either.

Does anyone have knowledge of a conversion scale for liquids/volume from Imperial volume measurements to US volume or gram weights?

#2 SuzySushi

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 01:25 PM

Easiest and most accurate way to measure liquids is to use a measuring cup with milliliter markings (such as standard Pyrex measuring cups which are marked in milliliters on one side and cups on the other).

Approximate conversion chart (from Australian Women's Weekly cookbooks) is as follows:

Australian = American
1 cup = 1-1/4 cups
3/4 cup = 1 cup
2/3 cup = 3/4 cup
1/2 cup = 2/3 cup
1/3 cup = 1/2 cup
1/4 cup = 1/3 cup

Note that an Australian tablespoon (20 ml) measures 4 U.S. teaspoons (5 ml each). A U.S. tablespoon = 3 Australian teaspoons.

Edited by SuzySushi, 12 August 2008 - 01:27 PM.

SuzySushi

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#3 nickrey

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Posted 12 August 2008 - 02:59 PM

It must be an old cookbook.

The conversion trick with the metric system (which Australia has use since the late 1960s) is that one ml of water weighs 1 g (hence 1 liter = 1 kg).

160ml of water weighs 160g.

Milk has a slightly higher density than water with one liter (1000 ml) = (depending on level of fat) 1020 - 1050 gram.

Hope that helps

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

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Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
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#4 dougal

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Posted 13 August 2008 - 09:56 AM

For converting "cups" (of different origins and vintages) there's good info here http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Cup_(unit)

And never forget that Google is super useful for conversions
just type straight into the search box (for example)
1.4 us gallons in ml
or whatever is fazing you.
Its a great first shot.
http://www.google.co...html#calculator
"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

#5 Cadbury

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 01:04 AM

Okay, I've searched the forums and found nothing but threads that are far too many pages to search for this little nugget of info to fix my problem.  If only the search would bring you to the exact posting you need and not the whole thread - do I have something set incorrectly??

Enough whining - here's the problem...

I received an Australian cake book.  It seems the Australians are the last few souls left on this earth who rely on Imperial measurements. I am okay with the dry measurement since it converts easily to weighing on a gram scale, but the liquid stuff that converts to milli liters of volume is confounding me, especially when I get to a cup or less.  It would be great if I could weigh the liquids but I don't have the conversion for that either.

Does anyone have knowledge of a conversion scale for liquids/volume from Imperial volume measurements to US volume or gram weights?

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Would you mind giving a few examples of ingredients and their quantities? All of my books are in grams, metric cups or ml but I have no trouble converting back and forth.