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Nova Scotia’s Traditional Foods


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222 replies to this topic

#211 Hank Kingsley

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 09:15 PM

I live in the south end and find the Barrington Superstore to be awful. I've repeatedly been to the Clearwater and Fishermans Market and find both to be disappointing. The Fish Shop at the Halifax Farmers Market is fine but I think fish should be cut to order and served on ice. Peter, where can we get really good fish? And where do you think has the best fish and chips?
Pot smoking I don't mind, kids get the munchies hot wing sales go right through the roof but when those kids get on god knows what they eat like little birds.

#212 Peter the eater

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 05:39 AM

I live in the south end and find the Barrington Superstore to be awful. I've repeatedly been to the Clearwater and Fishermans Market and find both to be disappointing. The Fish Shop at the Halifax Farmers Market is fine but I think fish should be cut to order and served on ice. Peter, where can we get really good fish? And where do you think has the best fish and chips?

I usually hit Clearwater and Fishermans Market on a Friday afternoon and can always find something super fresh at a good price. If you're out of the city, there are a few lobster pounds that sell seafood right off the boat. I like Ryer's down the road from my neighborhood.

Best fish & chips? I've lost track there's so many. Phil's is good. I would have said Shaw's Landing but I haven't been back since the Swiss Chef went back to Switzerland.
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I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .
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#213 Peter the eater

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 05:50 AM

Those are the salmon scotch eggs from whoever's it was, somewhere on the Devon or Cornwall coast, are they ? They look great. That's an idea I stole too, just haven't gotten round to actually making any yet :biggrin:

Mind you, another eG thread in the last day or so has inspired yet another scotch egg idea...


That's right.

Paul Ainsworth's No6 restaurant in Padstow, Cornwall


I used quail eggs, farmed Atlantic salmon, plain breadcrumbs and maple syrup since I had no dill on hand. There a bit fussy but worth the effort.
Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .
Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .
Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

#214 PopsicleToze

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 06:16 AM

The high caliber of recent eg Foodblogs compels me to share.

A well-prepared scotch egg is a beautiful thing -- I stole this great idea from Prawncrackers.


:cool:

I am so glad you revived this thread. It's one of my favorite threads on this entire board! :wub:

Scotch eggs, huh. Never had them, but I've thought about making them many times. My forefathers do go back to Scotland (Graham Clan), so now I guess I *have* to make these.

Yours look really good. I'll let you know how mine come out.

Cheers!

#215 PopsicleToze

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Posted 31 March 2011 - 06:53 AM

Question... I'm finding 2 schools of thought on the eggs. Do you boil them so that they are cooked completely like you would for any other boiled egg, or do you just boil them enough for the white to set so that the yolk isn't completely cooked?

Thanks!

#216 Peter the eater

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Posted 31 March 2011 - 09:38 AM

Question... I'm finding 2 schools of thought on the eggs. Do you boil them so that they are cooked completely like you would for any other boiled egg, or do you just boil them enough for the white to set so that the yolk isn't completely cooked?

Thanks!


Most Scotch eggs I see are pub food served warm with draft beer. For some it's more of a cold picnic item that travels well. To serve a warm scotch egg with a perfectly soft yolk is no small feat, like a rare beef tenderloin cooked en croute. For my quail eggs in salmon above I boiled them to medium, cooled then shelled. It's cheaper to tinker with Scotch eggs than Beef Wellington.
Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .
Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .
Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

#217 baconburner

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Posted 01 April 2011 - 08:43 PM

I am an ex Montrealer who spent time in Nova Scotia,Grandparents and parents retired there. Also a stint at Cornwallis. I have in front of me the Dutch Oven cook book prepared by the Ladies Auxilliary of the Lunenburg Hospital Society from 1976. Many a good recipe which I still prepare. Soups and chowders and all the goodies. Bon Appetite

#218 Peter the eater

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 02:44 PM

Farm-fresh Speckled Trout and fiddleheads for dinner tonight.

The fish will likely be baked with herbs and citrus. Steam the ferns, make some rice, bob's your uncle.

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Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .
Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .
Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

#219 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 03:47 PM

I can't believe this thread has made it to 8 pages without a single mention of Nova Scotia Black Fruitcake! The recipe I use was passed from a great-aunt from Halifax, and it has apparently been in my family for centuries. When I was in Halifax last I asked around, and apparently it's not just a tradition in my family, either. It definitely bears inclusion in the traditional NS foods, as it's the best fruitcake running (especially after 6 months in black rum... :biggrin: )

Posted Image
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#220 maggiethecat

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 06:10 PM

I can't believe this thread has made it to 8 pages without a single mention of Nova Scotia Black Fruitcake! The recipe I use was passed from a great-aunt from Halifax, and it has apparently been in my family for centuries. When I was in Halifax last I asked around, and apparently it's not just a tradition in my family, either. It definitely bears inclusion in the traditional NS foods, as it's the best fruitcake running (especially after 6 months in black rum... :biggrin: )

Posted Image


That looks swoonworthy. Can you point me toward a recipe?

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#221 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 06:23 PM

I'll post mine tomorrow morning. Be aware that it takes about 5 lbs of candied whatnots....
Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
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#222 Peter the eater

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Posted 20 May 2011 - 05:05 AM

I can't believe this thread has made it to 8 pages without a single mention of Nova Scotia Black Fruitcake!

I don't bake much. But you're right, it's a handsome regional classic.

Can you point me toward a recipe?

From Marie Nightingale's Out of Old Nova Scotia Kitchens:

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Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .
Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .
Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

#223 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 20 May 2011 - 06:18 AM

Here's my Aunt Roslind's recipe - it's a bit more involved than the one Peter has posted. It makes two standard loaf pans (9x5x3").

4 oz candied citron, coarsely chopped
2 oz candied lemon peel, coarsely chopped
2 oz candied orange peel, coarsely chopped
8 oz candied cherries, halved
1 lb candied pineapple, shredded
1 lb golden raisins
8 oz sultana raisins
4 oz currants (I substitute dried blueberries)
1/2 C black rum
4 oz almonds, blanched and shredded
4 oz walnuts or pecans, coarsely chopped
2 C sifted all-purpose flour
1/2 TSP mace
1/2 TSP cinnamon
1/2 TSP baking powder
1 TBSP milk
1 TSP almond extract
2 TBSP blackstrap molasses
1/2 C butter (1/8 lb)
1 C granulated sugar
1 C brown sugar, packed
5 eggs.

1. Mix the fruits, add the rum, and allow to stand overnight.
2. Preheat the oven to slow (275 F). Grease your pans, line with wax paper, and then grease the paper (don't skip the greasing the paper step!)
3. Combine the fruit mixture, the nuts, and 1/2 C of flour.
4. Sift together the remaining flour with the spices and baking powder, and add the almond extract and molasses to the milk.
5. Cream the butter until smooth, adding the sugars gradually, and continue to mix until even. Add the eggs, mix well, and then add the milk mixture. Add the flour mixture and mix well.
6. Pour the batter down over the fruits and nuts, and mix thoroughly. Fill the pans and press the batter down firmly.
7. Bake the loaves for about 3 hours. Remove from the oven when the toothpick comes out clean, and let stand 30 minutes, then turn out of the pans onto wire racks and peel off the paper.
8. Once the cakes are fully cool, wrap them in cheesecloth soaked in the liquor of your choice (I use more black rum), and place in a tightly sealed container. Allow to age 1 month (minimum), adding about 1/2 oz of liquor every week.

I have a stone crock for aging my own cakes, and (since I offer this fruitcake seasonally in my bakery) I've found that cakes can be aged very well at the back of the fridge, simply wrapped in cheesecloth, then tinfoil, and sealed in ziplock baggies.
Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
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