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New Orleans 72hours


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#1 Daniel

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 08:31 AM

I always see on the flight mags the perfect weekend in various locations.. For my girl's birthday, a pretty monumental one, we are headed over Thursday night and staying for the weekend..

We have been there a bunch of times, I am just curious what are peoples favorites..

Most of the times we go there, we stay at Hotel Lafayette.. We love this place, the large rooms, the friendly folk.. We normally get the same room.


Some of ours are:

Liuzza's Shrimp Po Boy
Galatoires for brunch
Antoines for brunch
Vaughn's for music
Willy Mae Scoth House

Obviously the list goes on.. But would be interested in hearing some places for great music..

We are going in June... We want to go to a crawfish boil/ music place.. Anyone have anything in mind?

Just looking for some help...

#2 Toliver

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 10:59 AM

PM Brooks (Mayhaw Man). He should know what's still good and what isn't.

edited to add: I hope you'll post pics of your journey. I've always enjoyed your past repasts, so to speak, that you've posted on eGullet.

Edited by Toliver, 28 May 2008 - 11:01 AM.


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#3 joiei

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 01:20 PM

If your there on the 7th, I was just reading about the Oak Street BBQ festival.
It is good to be a BBQ Judge.

#4 Daniel

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 01:41 PM

We arrive the night of june 12th.. Just in time to go to there show.. http://www.myspace.c...mitruffinsmusic

#5 PopsicleToze

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 08:55 AM

Donald Kink's COCHON restaurant is fabulous.
http://www.cochonrestaurant.com/

It's been mentioned several times on this board and is really fabulous. Plus, since it's all about the pork -- it's right up your ally (I seem to recall wonderful dinner pics you posted before of an all pork feast). :biggrin:

Chef Link and co-owner Chef Stephen Stryjewski, embracing the old style traditions receive whole pigs and oversee an in-house Boucherie, creating boudin, andouille, smoked bacon, and head cheese. The menu also features handmade crawfish pies, rabbit & dumplings, and spoon bread with okra & tomatoes. Cochon offers specialties from the wood-burning oven such as roasted oysters, suckling pig, and beef brisket. Seafood from local waters round out the offerings with Chef Link’s signature roasted gulf fish “fishermen” style.



#6 TAPrice

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 12:17 PM

You're arriving a little late for crawfish season. Would you settle for shrimp?

I agree that Cochon is great. It seems to keep getting better.

For music, I would recommend just heading to Frenchmen Street. There are always tons of clubs with live music, you can sample from the street before going in, and the covers are cheap.

So what are you looking for? High? Low? Typically local?

Don't overlook Parkway Barkery in Mid-City for a po-boy. Probably the best around right now. Also, Hansen's in Uptown will be open for snowballs.
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#7 Mayhaw Man

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 01:59 PM

It's funny. I just finished up with something and, part of it anyway, had to do with what I would do with my last, living, eating hours in New Orleans. Of course, I immediately wrote something that involved not eating out at all, but cooking, and, of course, I immediately got it back with a terse message saying that I had completely missed the point of the assignment. It only involved a day, so this isn't the same thing, but, right now, here's what I would do if I was coming in on Thursday night

Go to see Kermit at Vaughan's and hope that he has the grill out front.

If you can't or don't get your fill at Vaughan's, head over the the Verti Mart after the show and go enjoy a nice spread off of the buffet (I am crazy partial to the brussel sprouts coupled with a reuben sandwich, but that's just me-they have a wide selection and it's remarkably dependable).

Friday morning, I would get up and go have some breakfast at either The Bluebird or the Blue Plate Cafe (both are on Prytania, though BPC is much closer to downtown, easily accessible by streetcar, and my favorite of the two)

Lunch would be at Galatoire's DOWNSTAIRS. Friday lunch is something that is not to be missed at G's and it can be a great deal of fun if you just relax and get into the spirit of watching rich folks act like they are in a very expensive truck stop coffee shop.

Dinner on Friday night, after a lunch at G's, would be a bit lighter (also, I expect that you will want to see some music, so a big, fat nap might be the way to go in the late afternoon). I concur with Todd's Frenchman rec (unless there is something very specific that catches your eye) so, why not eat on Frenchman. I love Mona's (all of the Mona's, but that one holds a special place as it was a) opened right after the storm and b) it's convenient to DBA, which has it's own set of attractions, all of them shaped like taphandles) or maybe, if you still want some calories, Praline Connection or Marigny Brasserie. I like them both, though the first is pretty much straight up Creole soulfood and the second is much more contemporary and a in a space that I really like.

Sat morning, you'll be exhausted, but you can't quit (sleeping is for babies). Get up and head out on the streetcar for a ride. Go all of the way up to the end of the line (at least currently-supposedly they are pretty close to letting them run all of the way) and eat at Camellia Grill. No, the food isn't the best-it never has been-but the experience is well worth it and a nice morning on the streetcar, no matter where you are going, is always a pleasant deal. St Chuck is one of the most beautiful and interesting streets in the US and it's always fun to look at. Before you get back on the streetcar, you should walk up to the top of the levee and look at the river. Though it's falling, it's still pretty high and it's something to see. Downriver ships are flying on the current and upriver ships and barges are barely moving. I live 12 blocks from the river and at night I can hear them perfectly. They are burning some diesel to keep going against that current.

Now, lunch would be at Willie Mae's. You'll be hungry after all of that activity. Just go, plan on it not being fast (go before 1-they stop seating at 2, but if you go to late, you'll miss some veg, usually and bread pudding if Carrie has it is always in short supply). Order the chicken, immediately, before you order water or anything else, because IT IS GOING TO TAKE 25 MINUTES TO COOK and there is nothing you, or anyone, can do to speed it up. It's made to order, as it should be, and it's worth the wait. If she has stewed chicken on the menu, I would get that, but the pork chop and the veal are also always worth getting. It's what it is-basic food that is basically great (thanks Joe).

Saturday night, for me, would be time to go see my friend porky in all of his many guises-namely I would head down to Cochon and order the entire app section of the menu. If I was still hungry, the entrees are still there, but if there are two of you, this would be a great way to see what Steven Stryjewski and Donald Link have going on and you'll like it-period. If you don't, well, something is bad wrong with you.

Sunday morning, assuming that 72 hours means that you are bailing out on Monday, you might as well go on over to Cafe DuMonde and do the tourist thing. Nothing wrong with that. It's a great place and, on top of that, it's one of the superior people watching locations in the city, in my mind. I love it there and, even though I know it's a bit trite, I go there more often than I like to admit-plus it's good coffee and it's cheap. What mo' could you axe fo?

Sunday lunch would be a great time to go to Parkway Bakery (forget Liuzza's, do soemthing new). Great sandwiches, interesting place. Once again, if you are going for Sunday lunch, you can just ride the Canal Streetcar out to Jeff Davis and walk straight down Jeff Davis until you get to it. It's a very pleasant walk and would afford you the opportunity to see a neighborhood that is, at the point, a good snapshot of modern day New Orleans-some of the houses are perfectly rebuilt and landscaped, some of them are just gutted and some of them, well, dey ain't dere no mo'.

Sunday dinner-this is a tough one. Sunday night is not the greatest dining night in New Orleans, but if you are staying Downtown, why not stay downtown. How about Mr B's, GW Finn's or Bayona (for something on the other end of the scale, pricewise, there are always Coop's, Louisiana Pizza Kitchen, or maybe a sandwich from Acme).

Monday morning, assuming that your flight is not at daylight, I have one that you will never have heard of. Get the cab driver to take you to Sammy's Deli on Elysian Fields. It's an old school, family owned, place that, in my mind, is currently making the best poboys in New Orleans and they also make really good standard breakfast stuff. It's in a completely new (well, it's a year old, but you know what I mean) kitchen and front of house that has become a big favorite among early risers or all nighters who have been working all night. Lots of cops, national guards, bus drivers, ups guys, etc use it to begin or end their day. I'm crazy about the place and it's kinda, sorta on the way to the airport, so what the hell, huh? Might as well have one more belt buster before you leave K-ville to go back to Perfectville.

Well, that should about do it. These are just my recs in stream of conciousness form. I could, and do, change my mind about this stuff daily, but for now I think that this is the way that I would go. I purposely left our Antoine's, because though I respect the institution (been eating there all of my life) for what it is, the food, well, it's not much to write home about. I also didn't include Liuzza's for the reasons stated above (thought they do have good gumbo and it can all be washed down by giant fishbowls of cold Abita Amber-so, it's not really a mistake-just a repeat). Also, I would definitely find time to squeeze in a snoball from Hansen's. They ARE New Orleans cuisine just as much as any of the hoity toity stuff that you might find on the menus that I recommended above. Plus, the whole experience at Hansen's is way worth it. If you go on Sunday afternoon, kinda around 5, you can get a snoball and walk the 8 blocks down Tchop to Tips and listen to, or participate in, one of the longest running musical events in NOLA, the Cajun Dance on Sundays. It's pretty fun to do, even if you can't dance a lick.

Anyway, have fun and bring lots of money to leave here. We can use it. Summer here is dead as a hammer and, this year, it looks particularly bleak. While tourism is way up, the summer, especially after the storm, has been dead.

Best,

B

Edited because I type like I talk, and that doesn't always translate to standard English lit.

Edited by Mayhaw Man, 03 June 2008 - 02:18 PM.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

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#8 Kim WB

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 03:33 PM

Brooks,

With all respect ( after all, I just read the reference to you in Gumbo Tales!) this reads a bit too Chowhoundy...its a MONUMENTAL birthday...so from a woman's perspective...and one who has celebrated a few monuments...a little more silver, a little more white tablecloths...a lot less grit. Bayona, perhaps.

And, as I say to friends who don't visti NOLA 2x a year as I do...if you are a tourist....it is really, truelly, fully, honestly OK to visit tourist places. In other towns, they suck . In New Orleans, they epitimize.

Brunch at Commanders, request the front room if u can...and breakfast at Brennans...I dont' care how much people make fun of it as a tourista....go to Brennans, have champagne, the eggs sardou, the bullshot, the flaming BF. We went there to celebrate 10 years of marriage, and dined with 3 newlyweds ( city hall across the street!) with whom we still touch base.

If I could not have breakfast at Brennan's, I would not plan a trip to NOLA. ( make friends w/ your waiter, it matters.)

Edited by Kim WB, 03 June 2008 - 03:35 PM.


#9 Mayhaw Man

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 04:26 PM

Brooks,

With all respect ( after all, I just read the reference to you in Gumbo Tales!) this reads a bit too Chowhoundy...

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Well, that may be, but, in reality, the last thing on Earth that I would ever tell anyone to do is go have breakfast at Brennan's. It's the most overrated, over priced place in this city. It's expensive dinner money for an ok breakfast in a nice room, IMO. I know that people love it, and I'm glad that you did, but it's just not my cuppa, you know? I love the room though and on the rare occasion when I am invited to a large social event there, I always enjoy it. So, to each his own.

Beyond that, you might be right, but I was telling them what I might do (and, for what it's worth, I just discussed this with my S.O. and she didn't think that it was far off of the mark-and she knows more than just about anyone in this country about dining and restaurants and is not short on informed opinion). I was using his list as a kind of general guide, which, with the exception of Antoine's, was not exactly August, Mila (I love these two first choices the most in the city right now-MILA inspires and August makes me glad that I still live here), Herbsaint, Bayona, and Delmonico- which, incidentally, if I was talking fine dining, might be my first four choices-but, of course, I would probably also include Commander's (but only for weekday lunch), Lillette, which I dearly love (mmm, pork belly with cucumbers and tomatoes), Clancy's (maybe not the best place in town, but damned tasty and very, very New Orleans in an Uptown, downscale, Galatoire's kinda way), Upperline (Ken doesn't ever screw it up-he's a wonder to behold when rattling the pots and pans) and certainly Brigstens. It looked to me like he was looking for a New Orleans thing that was not really just the tried (for good reason-they're good) and true.

Stepping down a notch, I am currently a huge, huge fan of Dante's Kitchen, and then there's Jacques Imo's, Zoe, Luke, Bacco, Stella, Muriel's, K-Pauls (another one of my never tiring favorites-it's what it is, which is generally great at all times, though really pricey), Mandina's, Jamila's, Mat and Naddies, and the list would go on and on.

Anyway, it's a big town for places to eat and the time of year that he is going to be here means that getting in isn't exactly going to require sitting in the bar on the wait for two hours, so they have a clean shot at anywhere that they want to go. It's hard to miss this time of year-shrimping and crabbing is good, there are lots of fresh fish being caught, and generally things are straight in off of the boat (the ones that are disappearing because of 4.35 a gallon diesel, so enjoy it while you can) and into the pan. You can't get that just everywhere in this country. We're lucky that way.

Glad you picked up Sara's book. It's really a great read. Every week when I pick up the Gambit I wish that I could just turn the clock back three years and get things back to that point in time. Reading her columns every Sunday night or Monday morning were always a highpoint in the week. She's truly amazing at what she does and I'm glad that she's a friend, but I wish that she had her old job back. It's not that Ian McNulty isn't good-he is and I enjoy his work-it's just that Sara has a touch about combining the food, the places, and the people that isn't very easy to achieve and she can do it in her sleep, or so it seems.

Edited by Mayhaw Man, 03 June 2008 - 04:28 PM.

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#10 Kim WB

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 05:06 PM

Brooks,

Glad you picked up Sara's book. It's really a great read. Every week when I pick up the Gambit I wish that I could just turn the clock back three years and get things back to that point in time. Reading her columns every Sunday night or Monday morning were always a highpoint in the week. She's truly amazing at what she does and I'm glad that she's a friend, but I wish that she had her old job back. It's not that Ian McNulty isn't good-he is and I enjoy his work-it's just that Sara has a touch about combining the food, the places, and the people that isn't very easy to achieve and she can do it in her sleep, or so it seems.

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well, not sure if she can do it in her sleep, but she for sure does it in her book....

I'm sure you're rec's were good food, good eats, good times..but pomp, circumstance, MOMENTOUS meals can be had and should be encouraged..I am sure our reader will decide, and hopefully report back..but your list needed a bit more SPECIALNESS, imho.

Brennans. they give you a wine list with breakfast and cook bananas and sugar under your nose....transforming, NO...the stuff that dreams are made of...YES.

K.

#11 Mayhaw Man

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 05:28 PM

..but your list needed a bit more SPECIALNESS,  imho.

K.

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See, that's why there are all kinds of people in this world.

To me, in this place and at this time, if someone said, what would be your favorite meal, in terms of all conditions and considerations (food, atmosphere, service time of day, etc.) mine would easily be a 4 or 5 hour, day ending (oh boy, trust me on this one-there's no point in having early dinner plans) experience at Galatoire's on a Friday. Maybe you have to be from here, or maybe you even have to have been raised with it, but it's a really interesting, entertaining, and truly fun experience if you can just relax and enjoy it. It doesn't get anymore New Orleans than G's on a Friday lunch.

On the other hand, I think that a few hours eating everything on the top of the menu at Cochon is, in an entirely different way, just as nice. It's all about what you want, I guess. To me, just because it's all white tablecloth and decked out waitstaff and decked out diners, doesn't always make the evening more special. If it did, I would just tell people to go marching to Antoine's. They dress real pretty there and it certainly is nice since the Hurricane redo.

That being said, lately, when I have something to do that requires getting dressed up and "doing it up right" I have been going to MILA over and over again. One night, during the IACP, I actually managed to have apps at MILA, entrees at August, and dessert and nightcaps back at MILA. That, my friend, was a night that anyone could appreciate in terms of specialness (they are conveniently only a few blocks apart-so it's pretty easy to do). MILA is my favorite, not "old school", room in the city. Alison and Slade are as talented as anyone around and the service is just what I like-well timed, but not overly attentive (not 800 trips refilling water and asking, "how's everything?"). Were I in NOLA, and needed a night to do this sort of thing, I would pick it for them over everything else, but with one caveat-since Daniel is well known as a NY food guy, he probably wants to stay more on the NOLA side of things and, in that regard, August, Bayona, and Herbsaint all fit the bill perfectly (though John's stuff at August is a bit more on the modern side of things, so, if you want to stay a little bit closer to LA traditional, but really worth it and on the mark, I would take the second two over the first-but they're all damned tasty).

But, like I said, it's pretty hard to miss here in the Summertime. Hotels and flights are rock bottom and restaurants are even more glad to see you than they normally are. It's too bad more people don't put it into their summer travel plans.

While he's here, I'll be there for the Big Apple BBQ and the Beard's. Can't wait.
Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

#12 Dave the Cook

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 08:15 PM

It's hard for me to imagine not having a momentous occasion at most of the places Brooks recommends (which is pretty much my list, too) simply by phoning ahead and telling the staff what was up. A place can be special, but it has to be the right place for the right people at the right time.

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#13 Sarabeth

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 05:59 AM

And just to toss my two cents into the ring...

We celebrated my husband's birthday last month at Brigtsen's. It was fabulous in every possible way: champagne brought out to the hallway while we waited for our table, wonderfully friendly but not intrusive service, and of course, amazing food in a beautiful setting. They even sprinkled birthday confetti on the table. It was a wonderful evening: elegant but not pretentious.

I would also include Ralph's On The Park for beautiful setting and excellent locally inspired food.
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#14 Daniel

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 07:27 AM

You're arriving a little late for crawfish season. Would you settle for shrimp?

I agree that Cochon is great. It seems to keep getting better.

For music, I would recommend just heading to Frenchmen Street. There are always tons of clubs with live music, you can sample from the street before going in, and the covers are cheap.

So what are you looking for? High? Low? Typically local?

Don't overlook Parkway Barkery in Mid-City for a po-boy. Probably the best around right now. Also, Hansen's in Uptown will be open for snowballs.

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Hansens and Cochon.. Definitely in the mix.. Thanks guys.. Frenchmen street is definitely a must..

#15 Daniel

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 07:28 AM

It's funny. I just finished up with something and, part of it anyway, had to do with what I would do with my last, living,  eating hours in New Orleans. Of course, I immediately wrote something that involved not eating out at all, but cooking, and, of course, I immediately got it back with a terse message saying that I had completely missed the point of the assignment. It only involved a day, so this isn't the same thing, but, right now, here's what I would do if I was coming in on Thursday night

Go to see Kermit at Vaughan's and hope that he has the grill out front.

If you can't or don't get your fill at Vaughan's, head over the the Verti Mart after the show and go enjoy a nice spread off of the buffet (I am crazy partial to the brussel sprouts coupled with a reuben sandwich, but that's just me-they have a wide selection and it's remarkably dependable).

Friday morning, I would get up and go have some breakfast at either The Bluebird or the Blue Plate Cafe (both are on Prytania, though BPC is much closer to downtown, easily accessible by streetcar, and my favorite of the two)

Lunch would be at Galatoire's DOWNSTAIRS. Friday lunch is something that is not to be missed at G's and it can be a great deal of fun if you just relax and get into the spirit of watching rich folks act like they are in a very expensive truck stop coffee shop.

Dinner on Friday night, after a lunch at G's, would be a bit lighter (also, I expect that you will want to see some music, so a big, fat nap might be the way to go in the late afternoon). I concur with Todd's Frenchman rec (unless there is something very specific that catches your eye) so, why not eat on Frenchman. I love Mona's (all of the Mona's, but that one holds a special place as it was a) opened right after the storm and b) it's convenient to DBA, which has it's own set of attractions, all of them shaped like taphandles) or maybe, if you still want some calories, Praline Connection or Marigny Brasserie. I like them both, though the first is pretty much straight up Creole soulfood and the second is much more contemporary and a in a space that I really like.

Sat morning, you'll be exhausted, but you can't quit (sleeping is for babies). Get up and head out on the streetcar for a ride. Go all of the way up to the end of the line (at least currently-supposedly they are pretty close to letting them run all of the way) and eat at Camellia Grill. No, the food isn't the best-it never has been-but the experience is well worth it and a nice morning on the streetcar, no matter where you are going, is always a pleasant deal. St Chuck is one of the most beautiful and interesting streets in the US and it's always fun to look at. Before you get back on the streetcar, you should walk up to the top of the levee and look at the river. Though it's falling, it's still pretty high and it's something to see. Downriver ships are flying on the current and upriver ships and barges are barely moving. I live 12 blocks from the river and at night I can hear them perfectly. They are burning some diesel to keep going against that current.

Now, lunch would be at Willie Mae's. You'll be hungry after all of that activity. Just go, plan on it not being fast (go before 1-they stop seating at 2, but if you go to late, you'll miss some veg, usually and bread pudding if Carrie has it is always in short supply). Order the chicken, immediately, before you order water or anything else, because IT IS GOING TO TAKE 25 MINUTES TO COOK and there is nothing you, or anyone, can do to speed it up. It's made to order, as it should be, and it's worth the wait. If she has stewed chicken on the menu, I would get that, but the pork chop and the veal are also always worth getting. It's what it is-basic food that is basically great (thanks Joe).

Saturday night, for me, would be time to go see my friend porky in all of his many guises-namely I would head down to Cochon and order the entire app section of the menu. If I was still hungry, the entrees are still there, but if there are two of you, this would be a great way to see what Steven Stryjewski and Donald Link have going on and you'll like it-period. If you don't, well, something is bad wrong with you.

Sunday morning, assuming that 72 hours means that you are bailing out on Monday, you might as well go on over to Cafe DuMonde and do the tourist thing. Nothing wrong with that. It's a great place and, on top of that, it's one of the superior people watching locations in the city, in my mind. I love it there and, even though I know it's a bit trite, I go there more often than I like to admit-plus it's good coffee and it's cheap. What mo' could you axe fo?

Sunday lunch would be a great time to go to Parkway Bakery (forget Liuzza's, do soemthing new). Great sandwiches, interesting place. Once again, if you are going for Sunday lunch, you can just ride the Canal Streetcar out to Jeff Davis and walk straight down Jeff Davis until you get to it. It's a very pleasant walk and would afford you the opportunity to see a neighborhood that is, at the point, a good snapshot of modern day New Orleans-some of the houses are perfectly rebuilt and landscaped, some of them are just gutted and some of them, well, dey ain't dere no mo'.

Sunday dinner-this is a tough one. Sunday night is not the greatest dining night in New Orleans, but if you are staying Downtown, why not stay downtown. How about Mr B's, GW Finn's or Bayona (for something on the other end of the scale, pricewise, there are always Coop's, Louisiana Pizza Kitchen, or maybe a sandwich from Acme).

Monday morning, assuming that your flight is not at daylight, I have one that you will never have heard of. Get the cab driver to take you to Sammy's Deli on Elysian Fields. It's an old school, family owned, place that, in my mind, is currently making the best poboys in New Orleans and they also make really good standard breakfast stuff. It's in a completely new (well, it's a year old, but you know what I mean) kitchen and front of house that has become a big favorite among early risers or all nighters who have been working all night. Lots of cops, national guards, bus drivers, ups guys, etc use it to begin or end their day. I'm crazy about the place and it's kinda, sorta on the way to the airport, so what the hell, huh? Might as well have one more belt buster before you leave K-ville to go back to Perfectville.

Well, that should about do it. These are just my recs in stream of conciousness form. I could, and do, change my mind about this stuff daily, but for now I think that this is the way that I would go. I purposely left our Antoine's, because though I respect the institution (been eating there all of my life) for what it is, the food, well, it's not much to write home about. I also didn't include Liuzza's for the reasons stated above (thought they do have good gumbo and it can all be washed down by giant fishbowls of cold Abita Amber-so, it's not really a mistake-just a repeat). Also, I would definitely find time to squeeze in a snoball from Hansen's. They ARE New Orleans cuisine just as much as any of the hoity toity stuff that you might find on the menus that I recommended above. Plus, the whole experience at Hansen's is way worth it. If you go on Sunday afternoon, kinda around 5, you can get a snoball and walk the 8 blocks down Tchop to Tips and listen to, or participate in, one of the longest running musical events in NOLA, the Cajun Dance on Sundays. It's pretty fun to do, even if you can't dance a lick.

Anyway, have fun and bring lots of money to leave here. We can use it. Summer here is dead as a hammer and, this year, it looks particularly bleak. While tourism is way up, the summer, especially after the storm, has been dead.

Best,

B

Edited because I type like I talk, and that doesn't always translate to standard English lit.

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Wow thanks Brookes.. I can definitely see us doing a lot of these things.. However, Liuzza's is a must for the lady.. Despite the fact that I make there stuffed shrimp po boy, she is demanding we go..

#16 Daniel

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 07:29 AM

Brooks,

With all respect ( after all, I just read the reference to you in Gumbo Tales!) this reads a bit too Chowhoundy...its a MONUMENTAL birthday...so from a woman's perspective...and one who has celebrated a few monuments...a little more silver, a little more white tablecloths...a lot less grit. Bayona, perhaps.

And, as I say to friends who don't visti NOLA 2x a year as I do...if you are a tourist....it is really, truelly, fully, honestly OK to visit tourist places. In other towns, they suck . In New Orleans, they epitimize.

Brunch at Commanders, request the front room if u can...and breakfast at Brennans...I dont' care how much people make fun of it as a tourista....go to Brennans, have champagne,  the eggs sardou, the bullshot, the flaming BF.  We went there to celebrate 10 years of marriage, and dined with 3 newlyweds ( city hall across the street!)  with whom we still touch base.

If I could not have breakfast at Brennan's, I would not plan a trip to NOLA. ( make friends w/ your waiter, it matters.)

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I have read the Breakfast at Brennans cookbook and made several items off of it.. Though I want to go, something tells me we are going to be doing Galatoires mainly..

#17 Daniel

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 07:34 AM

And please keep discussing, a buddy of mine just told me him and his girl are coming with us. We are pretty excited about that.. We are really flexible, we can do Bayonna as easily as we can do a sandwich shop attached to a gas station.. As long as the food is awesome and the mood is right, I am happy anywhere.. So thank you for all the perspectives.. I am bringing one set of nice clothes, one set of street clothes, and a couple of pairs of drawls.. We will be ready for anything..

#18 Daniel

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 09:06 AM

So, here is what I have from the birthday girl/organizer..

"Here's what I have so far

Thrusday
10pm: Arrive
11pm: Kermitt Ruffins @ Vaugans
After Midnight: Verti Marte (late night food)

Friday
10am: Get in Line for Galatoire's (hopefully we'll be sitting at a table by 11:30)
3pm-6pm: Leisure down Frenchman Street
8:30pm: Bayona, Lilette, Mosca's, Upperline (having trouble choosing where to eat - any help?)

Saturday
12pm: Willie Mays
4pm: Liuzza's, Central Grocery, Po Boy Spot (Help us - who really makes the best?)
9pm: 30th Birthday at Cochon

Sunday:
WHAT SHOULD WE DO?!?!? WHERE SHOULD WE EAT?!?!?! WHAT PLACES ARE WE MISSING?!?!?!
3:30pm: Leave for Airport back to NYC :(

What 24 hours restauarant spots are there in New Orleans?"

#19 TAPrice

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 04:08 AM

Friday
10am: Get in Line for Galatoire's (hopefully we'll be sitting at a table by 11:30)
3pm-6pm: Leisure down Frenchman Street
8:30pm: Bayona, Lilette, Mosca's, Upperline (having trouble choosing where to eat - any help?)


I think you'd be safe lining up at 11:00. It's Friday, but it's also the middle of the summer. And you just need a table for two.

Saturday
12pm: Willie Mays
4pm: Liuzza's, Central Grocery, Po Boy Spot (Help us - who really makes the best?)
9pm: 30th Birthday at Cochon


Personally, I'd go to Parway Bakery and Tavern for po-boys, although that BBQ shrimp po-bou at Liuzza's by the Track is mighty fine.

Sunday:
WHAT SHOULD WE DO?!?!? WHERE SHOULD WE EAT?!?!?! WHAT PLACES ARE WE MISSING?!?!?!
3:30pm: Leave for Airport back to NYC :(


Sunday is tough. Are you just looking for breakfast?

What 24 hours restauarant spots are there in New Orleans?"

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Only a few diners that I can think of. I don't even think Verti Mart is open all night these days. The Clover Grill in the Quarter is 24-hours on the weekend. Good burger. Some bars will sell you average food all night. How late do you need to eat?
Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"


Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

#20 Daniel

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 05:56 AM

Ahh yes the Clover Grill.. Now, I am trying to remember something about the Onion Rings.. They were either really good or really bad.. Something about them is standing out in my head.. I also remember there is a very colorful gentlemen who took an extreme liking to me who worked there..

#21 Timh

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 07:00 AM

For a burger I would hit Port o' Call on Esplanade(if its still open). Between Bayona, Lillet, and Upperline,why not hop to all three, all are different styles, and 2 dishes at each should be perfect.

#22 Sarabeth

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 08:10 PM

I second Parkway Bakery... they are my favorite shrimp poboy in the city. I did have the bbq shrimp poboy at Liuzza's By The Track for lunch today though... I admit that I asked for extra bread to soak up the gravy. Guilty as charged.

For the Friday dinner, I would recommend Petite Grocery or Ralphs on the Park. Grocery is a classy room with excellent food and service. Their steak tartare was great, as was the rest of the meal the last time I was there.

Ralph's is in my neighborhood and also one of my favorite standbys in the city. The food is always good and beautifully presented. The view of City Park is pretty and the bar is a great place to start or end a meal.
“The secret of good cooking is, first, having a love of it… If you’re convinced that cooking is drudgery, you’re never going to be good at it, and you might as well warm up something frozen.”
~ James Beard


#23 Daniel

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 08:29 PM

Ahh Liuzza's.. Its been so built up since the last time we went, I dont know if I can stop that train...

Any butcher shops I should stop by on my last day to pick up some andouille and bayou beefs..

#24 Daniel

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 07:33 AM

Best place to have a crawfish boil, though the season is over/ending?

#25 Mayhaw Man

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 11:00 AM

Best place to have a crawfish boil, though the season is over/ending?

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It's getting kinda late, but one fun thing to do is to go to Big Fisherman and get a few pounds (and a few of their crawfish pies-mmmm), some liquid refreshment, and head over to Audubon Park for a picnic.

Beyond that, they're getting harder and harder to find. We had some at Franky and Johnny's last week that were nicely sized and pretty good, though it's a crapshoot whether they'll be hot or not. It's usually best to do the place on a weekend night when they are sure to be busy and boiling.
Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

#26 Future Chef

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 11:47 AM

I gotta get down to New Orleans! I've only pass through there and never spent any quality time. This thread is making think that I gotta go sooner rather than later. Cheers.
"I take a vitamin everyday- it's called steak."

#27 Daniel

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 05:16 AM

Thanks everyone for all the help and talk.. Its great to have such a great reference and collection of passionate peoples...

In terms of andouille, we are all set.. A conversation with the chef at Cochon got me a bunch of stuff to take home.. He sold me there homemade andouille! Pretty excited about that.. I also met this guy at Nola Grocery who is picking me up 6 pounds he is buying at a butcher shop in another town 40 minutes away..

#28 Daniel

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 05:37 AM

So, I was supposed to take an 855 flight last night.. Around 10 am yesterday the im's start to come in..
"You wanna leave now?"
"I think there is an earlier flight leaving at 3?"
"I think I can get us on stand-bye!"
"Yup, we are reserved on stand-bye, first on the list"

"I am ready to go and packed, come pick me up?"

Before I know it, I am racing up the NJ turnpike heading torwards JFK... We arrive in NO and hit the ground running.. We show up to the Hotel Lafayette, throw our clothes in the closet and are out walking torwards Cochon...

We order a trio of small plates..

Fried rabbit liver in a pepper jelly sauce..Little shot of mint takes this to the next level..

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Fried aligator again with the mint.. A wonderful combination.. Think of Nobu's spicy rock shrimp with out the citrus..

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Here comes the bell of the freaking ball. Oyster covered in a chili and garlic compound butter and then thrown into a 650 degree wood burning smoky oven..

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Oven:

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The next dish the chef sent us out..

Head cheese.. Really well done.. Super rich, really wonderful texture.. Served with super crunchy bread, homemade pickled cucumbers and green tomatoes..

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Switching to something a little less heavy, we moved onto fried pig ears.. Must have been boiled, sliced into thin strips and then breaded.. Served over a wonderful rich and deep brown mustard sauce...

Fried perfectly and served hot, it was in between liquid and a solid..

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Ribs served with pickled watermelon.. I am pretty particular about my ribs.. And though I did not love them, techinically they were amazing.. Fall of the bone, really rich wet ribs.. I am more of a dry rub guy.. Loved the watermelon that was served with it...

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We ended dinner with the lemon buttermilk pie, a couple of shots of moonshine and plans of returning before the trip is over.. Not only to pick up my andouille but, to get that bacon oyster sandwich...

Pie crust was just beyond good.. If the photographer hadnt drank so much white lightening, I am sure you would be able to see the perfect thumb prints in the crust that was used to shape it..

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The night ended at around 2 or 3 am.. Instead of going to Vaughn's, we watched Big Al Carlson at the Funky Pirate.. We were able to watch two sets... We havent seen him in a couple of years but, wow.. The guy and his band are better then I have ever heard them.. He is doing this crazy high voice singing now and was just amazing.. He has a live version of I'll Play the Blues for You that is the best I have heard.. And upon request, he did a version last night that lasted 10 minutes.. Fantastic...

Miss A was a wonderful tip collector last night as well.. She walked the room with a bucket for him.. It was rather hilarious..

Edited by Daniel, 13 June 2008 - 05:46 AM.


#29 Daniel

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 07:10 AM

You know the old saying, you don't really buy drinks you rent them... That statement is never more correct then when talking about the Hand Grenade..

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Drinking these is like bullriding.. Its just a matter of time until the bull kicks you off.. Like clock work, after a night of drinking these disgusting concoctions, I am up puking at 6 am.. Sure you can tough it out and be miserable all day but, why fight it.. Go back to sleep and wake up hungry and happy by 8...

So, last night as we were heading home we asked a cop where the best place to grab something to eat.. "Port Of Call is 8 blocks that way, Clover Grill is a long walk that way but, Oceana is right down the street." By this time of night, the streets were getting shady. We were happy to go some place close and on the way home..

We order a oyster po boy and a side of shrimp etouffe.. I am nursing my last hand grenade and I no its time to stop.. "I think this time I am not going to get sick", I say to Miss A.. "I am not drunk and I feel perfect" "Uh-huh"she replies...

This is award winning stuff here.. This easily wins the absolute worst po boy I have ever had.. Some how they were able to mimic the cooking qualities of a microwave in a deep fryer.. The sandwich is way too bready and the 4 or 5 measly little rubbery oysters are pathetic.. Not to mention the sandwich is completely dry.. I had to order a side of sauce...

The photos dont do it justice.. It looks decent in the photo..Fries were soggy and poor.

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After trying this etouffe visions of Gordon Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares on BBC popped into my head.. The sauce was definitely from a mix or a dented can.. It tasted like a generic starchy sauce that could have been from any microwave meal..Just a starchy slimy mess.. One bite and I was done..

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Have a good day everyone, off to Galatoires.

Edited by Daniel, 13 June 2008 - 07:30 AM.


#30 Holly Moore

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 09:50 AM

Great start on the write-up. Thanks.

Do you drink the Hand Grenades or use them to light your way down a darkened alley. They look greener than those chemical doohickies one snaps to produce green light at concerts.

I'm in New Orleans for a week in August so will likely be following in your footsteps.

Eat well and prosper.
Holly Moore
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