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(Not So) Simple, Flavored, & Spiced Syrups


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#241 Baselerd

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:05 PM

Just made a pretty awesome vanilla syrup/garnish combination (actually out of a dessert book, Dessert Fourplays). If you have any vanilla beans (or scraped vanilla beans from baking), you can cut the vanilla bean husk lengthwise into thin strips, then simmer them in simple syrup for an hour or so. Remove the beans, dry them by setting them on parchment paper, and then roll them in granulated sugar.

The result is some pretty nice vanilla bean syrup with suspended vanilla bean seeds. And as a bonus, you get some crystallized vanilla bean strips for garnish.

#242 mkayahara

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:08 PM

(if you want to get down to brass tacks, it's not even technically a Daiquiri if you're using anything other than Bacardi White...

Are you maybe thinking of the Bacardi Cocktail?
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#243 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:10 PM

I'm thinking of my cocktail book from 1934 and its recipe for the Daiquiri which is quite specific.
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#244 EvergreenDan

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:31 PM

My go-to cocktail for fruit liqueurs, syrups or juices is a flavored caipirinha or (if it were muddled fruit, a batida). For a syrup, I'd try:

2 oz cachaca
.5 oz syrup
.5 to .75 oz lime juice.

Adjust for sweetness and fruit intensity. For tart liqueurs, I go as high as 1:1:0.5.

There is something about the earthy, funky cachaca that seems to go a bit better than molasses rum, in most cases. I tend to prefer a daiquiri with a really wonderful rum, where the simplicity of the lime and pure sugar leaves the rum in the foreground.
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#245 Mjx

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 05:22 AM


. . . .

Keeping in mind I'm about as far from having any sort of cocktail knowledge as is possible without growing up in some sort of stringent anti-alcohol community, would a riff on a daiquiri be an option? I had (please, please don't laugh) what was described as a rhubarb daiquiri the other night, and it was quite good (although my boyfriend and his friend exchanged amused looks). The syrup in it was vanilla, but I could definitely see doing something similar using a fruit syrup.


It's kinda hard to go seriously wrong by adding rum and lime to almost any fruit juice or puree, but that begs the question (as folks raised above with regard to sidecars) of whether the result is any more a "true" daiquiri than those abominable flavored vodka creations that are called "martinis."

. . . .



I had a hunch that the drink I had probably did not fall strictly within 'daiquiri' parameters, which I'm willing to respect, but admit to having no actual idea of.

I've never had a daiquiri [before?].

There's a link to the ingredients that the bar put together, though, and it was pretty tasty. If it was even a bastard version, I'd have to say that 'Rhubarb Bastard' sounds a pretty decent name for any for any drink that vaguely gestures toward some traditional cocktail, but very loosely. With rhubarb.

Panaderia Canadiense, did you give one of the fruit simples + cachaça pura a go yet?

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#246 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 05:43 AM

I did, last night. I had a (cocktail purists excuse me please) Spiced Peach Caipirinha which knocked my socks off. I would have tried the plum-vanilla next, but I realized that baking sourdough bread while more than half-snapped was a bad idea....

I prefer a slightly higher proportion of lime in this drink than Dan does, and I tend to leave the fruit quarters in the glass (a trick I learned in Manaus); it was mixed as follows, in an old-fashioned glass:

2 oz cachaça pura
.5 oz syrup
2 limes, quartered and well muddled with the syrup
cracked ice to about half-glass
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#247 Hassouni

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 10:34 AM

I was running low on my 2:1 SS, so I made some more. I used Florida Crystals evaporated cane juice, which I'm pretty sure is what I normally use, only this time my syrup was not clear like before but rather golden - so I'm thinking perhaps my previous batch was made with plain white sugar (which I just don't see, I haven't bought that in ages, but whatever). Can this kind of lighter evaporate cane sugar be used as a near-perfect substitute for white sugar syrup? It doesn't have an overly complex taste when compared to the Demerara syrup I made last night



#248 Hassouni

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 10:40 AM

Stupid question, when you, the industry, and everyone says 1:1 or 2:1, does that mean by volume or weight? I've done by weight so far...



#249 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 10:58 AM

I do mine by volume and I don't even measure the volume anymore; I just fill my container with the sugar and add an equal amount of water (visually) for simple syrup.


Edited by FrogPrincesse, 30 April 2013 - 11:00 AM.


#250 Hassouni

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 11:35 AM

See, I find that yields a less than 1:1 sugar:water ratio, as the water fills in the gaps around the sugar grains before it's even dissolved



#251 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 11:50 AM

I am not aiming for accuracy. My rationale is that I don't think that I would be able to detect the influence of a 5% or even 10% difference in composition of the simple syrup on the final cocktail. I am interested in seeing what others have to say though.



#252 Hassouni

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 12:26 PM

I should point out I also don't use the stuff fast enough to make 1:1 without it getting pretty dodgy...



#253 Yojimbo

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 12:40 PM

Cassia v. Canella in cinnamon syrup?

 

I'd been meaning to put up some cinnamon syrup to get ready for tikki weather (naturally, we hit a cold snap right afterwards), and decided to use canella instead of regular (to U.S. folks, at least) cassia cinnamon.  Since canella is popular in Mexico, I used piloncillo cones instead of regular sugar.  The syrup came out a bit light due to the ratios employed, but it worked surprisingly well with a blanco tequila and a little Benedictine and lemon:  not the most obvious combo for tequila.  It should be great with rum as well, which I plan to test tonight.

 

Anyone else used/using canella?


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#254 Rafa

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 01:42 PM

Canela (Ceylon) is what Don the Beachcomber used in his syrups, and thus appropriate for many Tiki drinks. It is softer and warmer than Cassia and plays well with other spices. As Mexicans know well, it also plays very well with chocolate. Your post makes me want to try it with tequila. More on Cassia vs. Ceylon and Tiki drinks here.

 

I prefer canela generally, but I'm biased, as Canela is my dog's name.


Edited by Rafa, 14 May 2013 - 01:51 PM.

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#255 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 03:21 PM

Cassia v. Canella in cinnamon syrup?

 

I'd been meaning to put up some cinnamon syrup to get ready for tikki weather (naturally, we hit a cold snap right afterwards), and decided to use canella instead of regular (to U.S. folks, at least) cassia cinnamon. Since canella is popular in Mexico, I used piloncillo cones instead of regular sugar. The syrup came out a bit light due to the ratios employed, but it worked surprisingly well with a blanco tequila and a little Benedictine and lemon: not the most obvious combo for tequila. It should be great with rum as well, which I plan to test tonight.

 

Anyone else used/using canella?

 

I've been using the cinnamon syrup from BG Reynolds which I just found out is a blend of cassia and Ceylon cinnamon.



#256 Hassouni

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 05:07 PM

I'd like to say you inspired me with the last few posts on this thread, as I just made some cinnamon syrup, but really I just wanted to kick into Tiki time with all cylinders firing  :biggrin:

 

Used 2:1 by volume plain old Domino white sugar and filtered water, 3 long sticks of Ceylon cinnamon smashed to tiny bits, boiled for a few minutes, and approaching the end of 2 hours steeping. It's bloody delicious.  First up, either a Jet Pilot, or 1934 Zombie.


Edited by Hassouni, 14 May 2013 - 05:08 PM.


#257 Rafa

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 05:12 PM

Both great choices. A (somewhat unorthodox) Jet Pilot at Brooklyn's Huckleberry Bar was my first Tiki cocktail and I fell in love. The Donga Punch is another great Beachcomber drink that has the comparative advantage of being easier to make.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#258 Hassouni

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 06:26 PM

Made the 34 Zombie. F Me (or as I said to my friend, "fuckity fucklington"), this may be the strongest yet most beguiling and inviting drink I've ever had. I can see why Don had a two-per-customer limit, because two would be my limit in one sitting, AND it was a pain in the ass to make! 

 

But so, so so  worth it.


Edited by Hassouni, 14 May 2013 - 06:30 PM.


#259 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 08:22 AM

Aki & Alex have a new post up at Ideas in Food on a milk simple syrup, which they created for a mascarpone frosting they were developing. Of course, my thoughts turned to cocktails..... 


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#260 bostonapothecary

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 11:09 AM

I would love to try a milk syrup old fashioned.


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#261 haresfur

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 02:25 AM

I would love to try a milk syrup old fashioned.

 

Wouldn't that be a milk punch?


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#262 Czequershuus

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 09:40 AM

Found some extremely nice and very cheap Jaggery Sugar at a local asian market I frequent. As I was nearly out of the turbinado syrup I had been using I decided on this for my latest dark sugar syrup. 

 

The Jaggery is pretty easy to works with, and only takes a little longer to dissolve than more refined sugars. I made a 2:1 syrup as I normally do, and the result is a viscous, almost caramel-like, slightly funky syrup. 

 

I tried it in a Rye Old Fashioned first, where it worked well, but it really shined when I tried it in and OF with some White Dog, where the rough edges of each harmonize very nicely.



#263 Hassouni

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 10:25 AM

Be sure to store it in the fridge. A while back I made syrup with panela (basically the same thing), and left it out for literally no more than 3 days and it got quite moldy by then. It was pretty close to 2:1, too...



#264 Czequershuus

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 10:34 AM

Be sure to store it in the fridge. A while back I made syrup with panela (basically the same thing), and left it out for literally no more than 3 days and it got quite moldy by then. It was pretty close to 2:1, too...

That was my plan, but I will be sure to keep a close eye on it. Thanks for the warning.



#265 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 10:58 AM

A touch of vodka or other neat alcohol seems to prevent mould in my panela simples…. Just saying.


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