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The Fruitcake Topic

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#391 IowaDee

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 09:15 AM

Wasn't Kate and Prince William's wedding cake at least part fruitcake?  A layer or something or else there were some separate small fruitcakes.  I think that's probably what made it possible for some to be auctioned several years later.



#392 rotuts

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 09:19 AM

for what its worth :

 

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Groom's_cake



#393 David Ross

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 03:16 PM

I think the historical family ties to fruitcake is fascinating. My Grandmother, Mildred Ross, was a very good baker and candy maker. Her family, the Slayton's, trekked from Missouri over the Oregon Trail ca. 1865 to stake a land claim in Prineville, Oregon. I remember my Father telling me how his Mother would send him fruitcake while he was fighting in Europe during the War.

 

Great Aunt Bertie May Pink is the woman I look to for inspiration when it comes to fruitcake. Bertie was my Grandfather Ralph Pink's Sister. We're not sure, but we think their last name "Pink" was actually an abbreviation of a longer Russian name. We know they left Russia in the 1880's to escape the persecution of Jews by the Russian government at the time. The Pink's eventually landed in sheep country in Southern Idaho, building a wool and pelt trading company in Twin Falls, Idaho. I've made many a fruitcake over the years, but I just can't come close to the cakes that Aunt Bertie made. And I suspect she kept that bottle of left over brandy for a little nip here and there.


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#394 andiesenji

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 04:14 PM

I think the historical family ties to fruitcake is fascinating. My Grandmother, Mildred Ross, was a very good baker and candy maker. Her family, the Slayton's, trekked from Missouri over the Oregon Trail ca. 1865 to stake a land claim in Prineville, Oregon. I remember my Father telling me how his Mother would send him fruitcake while he was fighting in Europe during the War.

 

Great Aunt Bertie May Pink is the woman I look to for inspiration when it comes to fruitcake. Bertie was my Grandfather Ralph Pink's Sister. We're not sure, but we think their last name "Pink" was actually an abbreviation of a longer Russian name. We know they left Russia in the 1880's to escape the persecution of Jews by the Russian government at the time. The Pink's eventually landed in sheep country in Southern Idaho, building a wool and pelt trading company in Twin Falls, Idaho. I've made many a fruitcake over the years, but I just can't come close to the cakes that Aunt Bertie made. And I suspect she kept that bottle of left over brandy for a little nip here and there.

I don't think there really is such a thing as "left over brandy" - - -  :rolleyes:


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#395 Katie Meadow

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 06:33 PM

I don't hate fruitcake, but I come from a long line of non-bakers and don't remember EVER eating fruitcake or being gifted with one. About thirty or forty years ago I baked my first and only fruit cake from a recipe in an old tattered book of uncertain provenance called Party Foods Book; I no longer have the book, just the page with the cake recipe. It calls for "butter or margarine" and "sour milk or buttermilk," so I'm thinking it comes from that transitional time when processed foods started appearing.

The cake was called Old Kentucky Black Fruit Cake and contained no neon fruit at all, just real dried fruits and candied orange peel. The recipe says the cake keeps indefinitely and suggests periodic soaking with wine, but I don't see why Kentucky bourbon wouldn't be nice. Whatever dried fruits (black and white figs are the main ones suggested) the baker had available and whatever nuts were also at hand seem to be the way to go. It does not specify any soaking of the fruit before using. Actually it was very good; dense and healthy. I never made it again but I have no idea why.
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#396 savvysearch

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 09:16 PM

I'm making a fruitcake that I've soaked twice in the past 3 weeks. I plan to soak it one last time next week. When should I eat it after the last soaking? Would a few days or a week suffice? 



#397 David Ross

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 12:29 PM

I'm making a fruitcake that I've soaked twice in the past 3 weeks. I plan to soak it one last time next week. When should I eat it after the last soaking? Would a few days or a week suffice? 

The longer the better.  After three days I'd say it will still be pretty stiff alcohol but by week three it would be better.  Some of the fruitcakes we've been discussing here have been aging nearly 10 years.







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