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Baozi recipes...

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#61 nakji

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 07:57 PM

I was planning on making some more bao this afternoon. I'll see if I can capture all the dough stages for you.

#62 Big Joe the Pro

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 09:38 PM

The best recipe for steamed dumplings I have is from the book 'Serve the People' by Jen Liu-Liu (I think that's her name). The book is an account of her coming to China around the turn of the millenium and learning how to cook Chinese food. It's got a couple dozen recipes in it. It's a good book kind of in a Jan Wong (author of 'Red China Blues', my favorite book about China) style.

Ms. Jen also started a cooking school for foreigners here in Beijing (Black Sesame Kitchen) and is/was a contributor to the 'New York Times'.

If you're trying to replicate Chinese restaurant tastes, don't forget the Maggi Chicken Powder and a heck-of-a-lot of salt!

Hope that helps, Joe
Maybe I would have more friends if I didn't eat so much garlic?

#63 Pierogi

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 10:36 PM

I made baozi for the first time yesterday with leftover "semi-Asian-fusion-sorta-Thai-maybe" pork ribs I'd made over the weekend. I cooked down some finely chopped onion, and mixed in the shredded meat off of the ribs to let it warm up. The I put in a sauce of soy, sesame oil, cornstarch and dry Sherry. Let that thicken and reduce, and cool.

The dough was yeast, sugar, oil and water, then mix in flour and salt. Kneaded it in my KA, and let it rise for about an hour and a half. Rolled it out, filled it, and let it rise again for about 1/2 an hour.

The results....a solid B (with an "A" for effort). The filling tasted great. The dough tasted GREAT. The texture of the dough was spot on. I need to work on my rolling & shaping technique. I had waaaaayyy too much dough on the bottom of the baozi, and not enough on the top. I also didn't have a bamboo steamer, and tried to use one of those metal folding "petal" style steamers in a large saucepan. I didn't realize how much the buns would grow during steaming, so I ended up with pretty much one giant baozi. Neither of the recipes I was referencing was clear about if they were put in the steamer "nude" or if they went in with their little aluminum foil diapers (mental note, read the eG thread before attempting something new....), so I also had some serious stickage problems as well.

Although they sure weren't pretty after I pried them off the steamer and apart, I was still pretty proud of how they turned out. As I said, taste and texture was right there. And they really were pretty easy....I will absolutely make them again, *after* I buy a bamboo steamer insert for my wok.
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#64 nakji

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 01:35 AM

Success, then. I've ended up with fused baozi before! Lesson learned for me - fortunately, I now have a double-layer steamer with plenty of room to spread. I'm trying Ben Hong's trick with parchment paper to deal with sticking.

#65 nakji

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 09:21 AM

I put up some step-by-step pictures of the pinch-and-pleat in my foodblog - but they're pretty lumpen looking.

#66 Dejah

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 12:28 PM

Erin: Did the bao mix you used in your blog have baking powder or did you add yeast?
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#67 Ben Hong

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 01:35 PM

Someone else mentioned the fact there is a difference between the doughs of steamed baos and the baked ones, there is also a difference in the doughs that go into different style baos. The dai bao or big bao generally is a bigger bao than the tea house dimsum variety...heavier, with a lot more filling etc., and generally made with yeast, although I add baking powder too. And, the whole thing is not sweet but savoury. The fou-fou dimsum variety is made with cake flour and baking powder. In these both the filling and dough are decidedly sweet.

To eliminate the mis-shapened and pinched appearance of your baos, use enough fresh yeast (or baking powder), process and let rise twice, make baos and give them enough time to rise and get plump, eliminating the creases and pleats,

#68 nakji

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 06:59 PM

Thanks, guys. The dough had yeast in it, but I didn't give them a long enough second rise - only ten minutes. The recipe called for twenty. Ben, did you poke holes in your parchment paper too? Or did you just put it in in a sheet?

#69 Ben Hong

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 10:28 PM

Don't need no steenkin' holes, just 3" x 3" squares of parchment paper. Absolutely non-stick.

#70 Pierogi

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 12:43 AM

Success, then. I've ended up with fused baozi before! Lesson learned for me - fortunately, I now have a double-layer steamer with plenty of room to spread. I'm trying Ben Hong's trick with parchment paper to deal with sticking.

Absolute success, I'm actually quite proud of myself ! Lessons learned for sure, and the parchment sounds like way to go. Well, that, and a larger steamer !
--Roberta--
"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley
Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

#71 nakji

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 04:59 AM

Don't need no steenkin' holes, just 3" x 3" squares of parchment paper. Absolutely non-stick.



Squares. Of course. Noted.

#72 Big Joe the Pro

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 04:33 PM


Don't need no steenkin' holes, just 3" x 3" squares of parchment paper. Absolutely non-stick.



Squares. Of course. Noted.


They sell specially-sized paper (with holes!) to fit into the bamboo steamers for that purpose. They're not cheap but cutting parchment paper into squares sounds pretty tedious. There's a hotel supply place here in Beijing that sells them, you could probably find them somewhere in the provinces.

The hotel supply place's HQ is in Shanghai, this is their web site: http://www.heconline.com.cn/. There's not an English-speaker in the huge place and they come across as not particularly caring about foreigners or providing a decent service (or both) but they stock a lot of stuff of acceptable quality at reasonable prices.

Personally, I have one of those metal pot steamers and use cheesecloth. Our nanny washes the cheesecloth afterwards and reuses it. I would probably just buy the inserts (and have been tempted to many times but I know it would just rub her sense of frugalitarianism completely the wrong way).

Edited by Big Joe the Pro, 12 February 2011 - 05:14 PM.

Maybe I would have more friends if I didn't eat so much garlic?

#73 Ben Hong

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 05:16 PM

Tedious?? Let geometry be your friend.

Cut 10 strips of 12"wide parchment paper 3" wide, stack the strips, double, cut, stack again, double and cut again. Presto ! 40 pieces of 3X3. Total time =3minutes. NOT EXPENSIVE!

#74 Big Joe the Pro

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 05:45 PM

Oh, I forgot to mention; there's a (rather expensive) series of cookbooks put out here in China called "Learn How to Cook Chinese Dishes" and they have a web site. The recipes of 75% of seven of the nine books in the series are online, including 'Rice and Flour Food' which is the one with the dumpling recipes.

This is the site: http://www.china.org.../food/26593.htm

I'm not vouching for the recipes, I have the books and some of the English definitely needs better editing, but it's worth taking a look and comparing to others in my opinion.

Edited by Big Joe the Pro, 12 February 2011 - 05:47 PM.

Maybe I would have more friends if I didn't eat so much garlic?

#75 nakji

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 07:16 PM

Cool site! I like how the measurements for the baozi are in weights.

There are some recipes there I haven't seen before.

#76 Big Joe the Pro

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 08:45 PM

51KF8T7595L__SL500_AA300_.jpg
Happy to hear you like it. The books are ok but, like I said, they're not cheap (RMB 80 each*) and the English isn't completely polished (although it's a pretty good job). The water measurements in the soup book seem way off (3/4 of a cup of water for a soup with no stock or any other liquid?!?) and the Guo Ta Dou Fu (tofu coated with egg) recipe drives me spare, for example. I had to have my wife go thru that one and translate the Chinese (and am doing my own, better, easier and tasier one now anyway).

The books seem to contain recipes that they think foreigners would like. There's a not a lot of heat and one (perhaps several) of them even requires an oven.

* = If memory serves there are only fifty recipes in each book, one side of the page is a photo (which isn't always an exact rendition of the recipe) the other side the recipe in Chinese and English. The descriptions at the bottom of the recipe are usually funny. 'The dish is shiny and delicious' for example. They're printed on laminated paper which is nice (and is surely one reason for the high cost), I can put them next to the stove and stir-fry away and just wipe them off with a towel when I'm done.

Oh, since I'm going on about the subject I might as well add that the 'Family Banquet' book doesn't seem to have any new recipes, they're all contained within the other eight books of the series. Also, some of the books mention a tenth book about how to do carving but I've never seen it for sale. Perhaps the English was too convoluted? A pity as I bought a box of carving tools (US $5) but have no idea as to how to use them. Would probably just wind up cutting myself, I'm pretty good about that!

Edited by Big Joe the Pro, 12 February 2011 - 08:55 PM.

Maybe I would have more friends if I didn't eat so much garlic?

#77 annachan

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 12:49 AM

I would definitely go with parchment as well. I tried making some plain steamed buns last week. Used wax paper as per the recipe and the buns stuck to the paper a little. I used a different recipe for the second batch and used parchment and it did not stick at all. For baozi, not sticking is important as I just hate it when the paper sticks and pulls the bottom off. Parchment can go in the freezer without a problem.

Will probably get my hands on making some baozi once I finish the plain buns. Those 40 buns are taking up space in my small freezer at the moment. :wacko:

#78 Dejah

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 08:35 PM

I made 50 of these last week and tried to document the process:

http://www.hillmanwe.../food/baos.html

I use cupcake liners and they work better than wax paper. There is a little dough left on the paper but never enough to break the seal and make the bao leak.

I am lazy; I don't want to cut parchment :raz:
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#79 TheTInCook

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 09:34 PM

I make mine like sheng jian bao. Don't have to deal with cutting paper squares or muffin liners that way.

#80 helenjp

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 09:34 PM

I don't know if this is quite proper, but here is a Japanese lazy panfried baozi recipe...the idea is obviously to imitate the fluffy type of dough. The texture is different but it does make for a quick, tasty snack.

Dough (supposed to make 6 small dumplings)
150-160 g flour
2 t baking powder
2 T sugar
0.5 t salt
80 ml milk
1 T Chinese sesame oil (i.e. toasted sesame oil, not the middle eastern kind)
Mix wet into dry ingredients. Knead quite well, allow to rest covered 15 minutes.

Filling (whatever you like, this isn't what I actually used)
150 g ground pork
1 dividing onion, chopped finely
2 dried shiitake or Chinee black mushrooms, soaked and minced finely (reserve water if you want)
3 T finely minced bamboo shoot
1 t each of grated fresh ginger, oyster sauce, sugar
2 t soy sauce (I think that's too much...I tend to use a splash of nam pla, a pinch of salt, and maybe 1/2 t soy sauce, with or without oyster sauce. Miso or other Chinese seasoning pastes are also possible)
1 T sake or other rice wine
Mix altogether very thoroughly with hands until pasty.

Divide dough into 6, pat out on your hand (between layers of wrap if you like), dump a teaspoonful of filling in the middle and close up the baozi as usual.

When all the baozi are ready, heat a fryingpan to medium-hot, pour in a little oil, line up the baozi leaving plenty of space, pour over 150 ml hot water (top up the shiitake liquid with hot water if you like) and put the lid on. Steam 3 minutes.

Turn heat down, steam a further 5-6 minutes and then remove lid. Turn heat up for just 10 seconds to crisp up the bottoms, and serve.

#81 TheTInCook

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 03:30 PM

Here's the formula I've been using for baozi. It makes a more northern style dough. Definitely not cakey. I think the addition of the baking powder lets me underproof the dough a little after forming the bao so the pleats look better after cooking.

100 Bread Flour
2 Yeast
2 Oil/Fat
2 Sugar
1 Salt
1 Baking Powder
60 Water

Mixing method: Straight Dough

http://thetincook.bl...room-baozi.html with pic from my first attempt.

#82 Dejah

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 04:11 PM

We can be generous with the filling whereas restaurant's will try to fill you up with dough. :wink:
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#83 liuzhou

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 07:56 PM

What units are the ingredients in?

#84 TheTInCook

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 09:07 AM

What units are the ingredients in?

It's bakers percentages.





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