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Trevally in Hawaii


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6 replies to this topic

#1 helenjp

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 07:20 PM

I noticed that one of my favorite medium-sized fish, trevally, is bang in season right now in Hawaii.

Is it popular in Hawaii? And how is it enjoyed there?

I can't buy it in Japan, but please help me dream :biggrin: !

#2 Tess

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 10:54 AM

I was in Honolulu when you posted this and looked for "trevally" on menus, not realizing that it's called "ulua" in Hawaii. Not living there, I don't get the chance to shop and cook fish, but I know I've eaten ulua in the past at places like Roy's. A quick Google for "ulua" turned up a couple Hawaiian recipes, including some of Roy's which include a short discussion of the fish.

When I want to dream about this kind of thing, I google Roy Yamaguchi, Alan Wong and Chef Mavro. The current menus always read like food porn to me and the fish recipes are always perfect for whatever type of fish. My current cooking fantasy is a piece of fish a friend had last week at Alan Wong's Pineapple room, which was sprinkled with furikake that had little round rice crackers in it. I saw that kind of furikake at the Japanese supermarket across the way, but I think they had added more rice crackers as it was almost a breading. :wub:

#3 wesza

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 01:09 AM

I noticed that one of my favorite medium-sized fish, trevally, is bang in season right now in Hawaii.

Is it popular in Hawaii? And how is it enjoyed there?

I can't buy it in Japan, but please help me dream :biggrin: !

View Post


Helen:

Trevally that your familiar with is generally known as the "Big Eye Travelly" it is part of a indigenous family of fishes called the "Jacks" sometimes, "Scads".

In Hawaii there are many species of this type of fish.

Ulua (Hawaiian name) is the same fish popular in Australia and New Zealand known as the Big Eye or Giant Travelly they may exceed 125 pounds. One of the most popular sport fish in both countries.

Omil'n (Hawaiian Name) ,Black Ulua are also popular in Hawaii the Pacific/Indian Oceans.

African Pompano is another species that are smaller, and even more delicious. Hawaiian name is Kagami Ulua.

Pomfret, Silver, Black or Gold and very popular in Asian Restaurants as the are more suitable for service as a whole fish prepared to order from a live tank.

The younger "Trevally" under 10 pounds are called "Papio" in Hawaii. They are very popular as the can be caught sometimes from the shore by fishermen. In certain area even the Giant Trevally are caught from shore in very Rocky areas. with great skill and special tackle.

There are types of fish in the Jack family that are available on both coasts of the United States all the way from New England to the Gulf of Mexico on the east.

Most famous of these Jacks are the "Pompano" always available for a premium price because it is in my estimation the best tasting of all the species. A favorite was of serving it in New Orleans is "En Papillote". The most reasonable priced is "Pomfret" available in most Asian Markets in America, also popular imported into Japan from India and China.

Some of the Japanese names at the wholesale markets are: Hiramasa, Ronin-Aji or Hiraaji.

I hope this information will make it easier to find in Japan. I have seen at at many of the larger department store with food departments.

I am aware of many ways of preparation it makes tasty cerviche and the Chiu Chow version of slicing diagonally the red frying is very easy and fun to eat.

Irwin

Edited by wesza, 16 February 2008 - 01:33 AM.

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

#4 helenjp

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 09:31 PM

Tess, sounds like they added some more crushed senbei to an "ochazuke" (tea poured over rice, with sprinkles added) mix. I've even seen it done with fried rice crackers, but I found that a bit too rich.

Weza, which is the more popular ulua in Hawaii, the white or the black?

Ceviche made with trevally/ulua - just reading that makes me feel HUNGRY! In New Zealand, I often had the Cook Island version (ika mata) or the Samoan version (oka, oka i'a) with coconut milk/cream.

#5 wesza

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 03:06 AM

Tess, sounds like they added some more crushed senbei to an "ochazuke" (tea poured over rice, with sprinkles added) mix. I've even seen it done with fried rice crackers, but I found that a bit too rich.

Weza, which is the more popular ulua in Hawaii, the white or the black?

Ceviche made with trevally/ulua - just reading that makes me feel HUNGRY! In New Zealand, I often had the Cook Island version (ika mata) or the Samoan version (oka, oka i'a) with coconut milk/cream.

View Post


It's a funny thing but in Hawaii the majority of Papio or Ulua are not predominant at retailers. Most fish are caught and consumed by the fisherman family and friends.

When available they sell fast but it's mostly by price at the market that day. The majority are exported after auction to locations all over the world. Many locally caught varieties of fish are sold for export by supply and demand unless you pre-order willing to pay a premium as a Restaurant or Retailer.

The fish generally caught in the Hawaiian market are considerably more expensive then those being caught commercially elsewhere where they are bled and flash frozen on the boats. Locally it's all fresh catch. The Papio (young Fish) are more available and sized better for home cooking or restaurants.

In many parts of the world they were considered to oily and were sometimes used for bait and chum not to many years ago. When I was growing up in New York during the summer we often caught small Jacks and were told they did not taste good, but save them for bait to catch Fluke.

Times change a good example is "Slime Head" for years thrown back when caught or used for fish meal, not very popular based on appearance or feel (yuck) but after we began marketing it as "Orange Roughy" it become very popular. I always have been successful with under utilized species by paying attention to items ethnic groups eat or simply being willing to try different things.

I have always found them very tasty, with some species like Pomfret and Pompano excellent in almost every recipe.

Helen have you found Trevally in Japan using sources I mentioned previously?

Irwin
I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

#6 wesza

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 03:07 AM

Tess, sounds like they added some more crushed senbei to an "ochazuke" (tea poured over rice, with sprinkles added) mix. I've even seen it done with fried rice crackers, but I found that a bit too rich.

Weza, which is the more popular ulua in Hawaii, the white or the black?

Ceviche made with trevally/ulua - just reading that makes me feel HUNGRY! In New Zealand, I often had the Cook Island version (ika mata) or the Samoan version (oka, oka i'a) with coconut milk/cream.

View Post


It's a funny thing but in Hawaii the majority of Papio or Ulua are not predominant at retailers. Most fish are caught and consumed by the fisherman family and friends.

When available they sell fast but it's mostly by price at the market that day. The majority are exported after auction to locations all over the world. Many locally caught varieties of fish are sold for export by supply and demand unless you pre-order willing to pay a premium as a Restaurant or Retailer.

The fish generally caught in the Hawaiian market are considerably more expensive then those being caught commercially elsewhere where they are bled and flash frozen on the boats. Locally it's all fresh catch. The Papio (young Fish) are more available and sized better for home cooking or restaurants.

In many parts of the world they were considered to oily and were sometimes used for bait and chum not to many years ago. When I was growing up in New York during the summer we often caught small Jacks and were told they did not taste good, but save them for bait to catch Fluke.

Times change a good example is "Slime Head" for years thrown back when caught or used for fish meal, not very popular based on appearance or feel (yuck) but after we began marketing it as "Orange Roughy" it become very popular. I always have been successful with under utilized species by paying attention to items ethnic groups eat or simply being willing to try different things.

I have always found them very tasty, with some species like Pomfret and Pompano excellent in almost every recipe.

Helen have you found Trevally in Japan using sources I mentioned previously?

Irwin
I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

#7 JumblyJu

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 04:48 AM

I was in Honolulu when you posted this and looked for "trevally" on menus, not realizing that it's called "ulua" in Hawaii. Not living there, I don't get the chance to shop and cook fish, but I know I've eaten ulua in the past at places like Roy's. A quick Google for "ulua" turned up a couple Hawaiian recipes, including some of Roy's which include a short discussion of the fish.

When I want to dream about this kind of thing, I google Roy Yamaguchi, Alan Wong and Chef Mavro. The current menus always read like food porn to me and the fish recipes are always perfect for whatever type of fish. My current cooking fantasy is a piece of fish a friend had last week at Alan Wong's Pineapple room, which was sprinkled with furikake that had little round rice crackers in it. I saw that kind of furikake at the Japanese supermarket across the way, but I think they had added more rice crackers as it was almost a breading.  :wub:

View Post

I've had that exact dish at the Pineapple Room and LOVED it!!! It was onaga, which is currently on the closed fisheries list in the main Hawaiian islands, due to overfishing. I think the real secret to that dish was the mayo.

Most of my knowledge about papio, omilu and ulua are from my fiancee and his friends. They are ethically against keeping those fish as they take a long time to grow. We've often gone fishing and have caught papio and omilu, but they are never kept. In fact they participate in a state funded tagging project.