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Chocolate Course

Confections Chocolate

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#31 tammylc

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 12:11 PM

Very fascinating, Kerry. I may have to try the piping bag filling technique - my molds are always a mess. And wiping off the cocoa butter with a paper towel - smart! I have 2+ lbs of light green white chocolate now because I didn't do something like that before scraping my molds.

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#32 Kerry Beal

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 02:45 PM

[quote name='prairiegirl' date='Feb 14 2008, 01:19 PM'][quote
For the ganache to be cut with the guitar the proportions were 290 g cream, 40 g invert sugar, 410 g dark chocolate, 40 g butter.  This was topped with a coconut ganache that used 180 g of boiron coconut pulp, 300 g white chocolate, 30 g invert sugar, 30 g cocoa butter and 40 g of dried coconut. 

Am I correct in assuming that the coconut ganache does not contain cream?
Thanks for sharing all this fabulous info with us.

View Post

[/quote]
Correct. The 'cream' is the coconut puree.

#33 schneich

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 03:04 PM

had the same problem filling my molds, i usually suck at molds ;-)
when kerry visited me we had a stop at a bakery pro shop, they have
a nice funnel which lets you fill the molds in no time, and since its stainless steel
you can blow some hot air to keep things in a flow :-) the best thing is that its just
25 euros --)

http://backshop24.es...Products/600238


cheers

t.

Edited by schneich, 14 February 2008 - 03:04 PM.

toertchen toertchen
patissier chocolatier cafe
cologne, germany

#34 John DePaula

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 03:22 PM

had the same problem filling my molds, i usually suck at molds ;-)
when kerry visited me we had a stop at a bakery pro shop, they have
a nice funnel which lets you fill the molds in no time, and since its stainless steel
you can blow some hot air to keep things in a flow :-) the best thing is that its just
25 euros --)

http://backshop24.es...Products/600238


cheers

t.

View Post

very nice price!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#35 Kerry Beal

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 04:18 PM

had the same problem filling my molds, i usually suck at molds ;-)
when kerry visited me we had a stop at a bakery pro shop, they have
a nice funnel which lets you fill the molds in no time, and since its stainless steel
you can blow some hot air to keep things in a flow :-) the best thing is that its just
25 euros --)

http://backshop24.es...Products/600238


cheers

t.

View Post

very nice price!

View Post

It was a nice looking little funnel too. Small, but you don't need a big one for filling molds.

#36 John DePaula

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 04:33 PM

had the same problem filling my molds, i usually suck at molds ;-)
when kerry visited me we had a stop at a bakery pro shop, they have
a nice funnel which lets you fill the molds in no time, and since its stainless steel
you can blow some hot air to keep things in a flow :-) the best thing is that its just
25 euros --)

http://backshop24.es...Products/600238


cheers

t.

View Post

very nice price!

View Post

It was a nice looking little funnel too. Small, but you don't need a big one for filling molds.

View Post

I've been eying those for a while now but most of them seem to be in the $150-200 range. Love the idea of using the heat gun to keep ganache from blocking up.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#37 alanamoana

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 07:09 PM

for some reason, i overlooked this thread until now! kerry, what a wonderful trip. thanks, as always, for your detailed descriptions and lots of photos!

are the photos of schneich's 'lab' on the other thread or will they be here?

#38 mrose

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 08:04 PM

The cheapest I've seen it is for $90.

http://www.culinaryc...00&prodid=77800
Mark
www.roseconfections.com

#39 ejw50

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 09:51 PM

Thanks again Kerry, a few other questions

1. On demolding technique. Can you describe the 'twist' a little more?


2. on filling molded chocolates. Some books I have read to wait until the ganache is 90 or so, so that you don't detemper the shells. I take it that chef doesn't think this matters?


3. the 'piping' way vs. 'dumping' way of backing chocolates. You've tried them both, do you have one preference?

#40 gap

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 09:58 PM

The cheapest I've seen it is for $90.

http://www.culinaryc...00&prodid=77800

View Post


For what its worth on these depositors, I have been told (by a very knowledgable pastry chef) that you should make sure that the one you buy does NOT have a metal seam running down the inside. I have not looked at any of the links given here, but apparently a cheaper model often has a seam running down the inside of the depositor which can stop the mixture flowing properly.

#41 alanamoana

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 10:38 PM

Thanks again Kerry, a few other questions

1. On demolding technique.  Can you describe the 'twist' a little more?

View Post


I'm not Kerry, but I'm pretty sure it is like when you're loosening ice from an ice cube tray. At least, that is how I've always done it.

#42 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 04:17 AM

for some reason, i overlooked this thread until now!  kerry, what a wonderful trip.  thanks, as always, for your detailed descriptions and lots of photos!

are the photos of schneich's 'lab' on the other thread or will they be here?

View Post

I'll put them on this topic if I am allowed.

#43 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 04:19 AM

The cheapest I've seen it is for $90.

http://www.culinaryc...00&prodid=77800

View Post

Look for a saucing funnel instead of confectionery and you might find a less expensive version.

#44 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 04:27 AM

Thanks again Kerry, a few other questions

1. On demolding technique.  Can you describe the 'twist' a little more?


2. on filling molded chocolates.  Some books I have read to wait until the ganache is 90 or so, so that you don't detemper the shells.  I take it that chef doesn't think this matters?


3. the 'piping' way vs. 'dumping' way of backing chocolates.  You've tried them both, do you have one preference?

View Post

As Alana notes, it's like an icecube tray, just a little twist on both ends at the same time. Weird to hear your polycarbonate molds crackle a little.

I think that by the time the ganache is ready to pipe it is lower than 90º F. I wouldn't add the butter until I knew the mixture was fairly cool and I wouldn't be comfortable piping until it's closer to room temperature. But I think his way of incorporating the cream gradually and slowing down if the chocolate is melting too quickly - and making sure there is still some tempered chocolate in the mixture before immersion blending will ensure the cooler temperatures.

I ladle chocolate onto my molds both to make the shells and back them off. Will I change over to piping bags? - unlikely. They cost money and because unlike those working with the selmi with the big flood of chocolate, I can control the amount of chocolate I ladle. I often have a dribble on the side away from me that I can't see however. Whenever I'm teaching classes, the students always point that out - "Hey, you missed a bit!".

#45 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 04:29 AM

The cheapest I've seen it is for $90.

http://www.culinaryc...00&prodid=77800

View Post


For what its worth on these depositors, I have been told (by a very knowledgable pastry chef) that you should make sure that the one you buy does NOT have a metal seam running down the inside. I have not looked at any of the links given here, but apparently a cheaper model often has a seam running down the inside of the depositor which can stop the mixture flowing properly.

View Post

Probably makes sense, however my antique funnel has a seam and I haven't had any trouble with flow (of course I've only used it for pates de fruit).

#46 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 06:40 AM

One of the items we produced was a very tasty dessert called 'Springtime'.

It consisted of a coconut dacquoise, a passion fruit cream layer, a compote of pineapple layer - held together with a white chocolate mousse.

I missed a few pictures in this series as I was tied up making something else.


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Peter, a professor at Niagara College, shows how to pipe a dacquoise. I have similar pictures of myself showing how not to pipe a dacquoise. Practice, practice, practice.

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Two different sized rings were covered on one end with plastic film, a bit of heat applied to shrink them a bit. The smaller rings were used to mold the passion fruit cream layer and the pineapple compote layer. Then into the freezer. The larger rings were used to compose the dessert with the mousse. The entire dessert was then placed in the freezer until time for decoration.

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Large dabs of chocolate were piped onto acetate. A second piece of acetate was applied, notice the technique of putting down one end first. This same technique was used when applying transfer sheets to chocolates coming off the enrobing line. This prevents bubbles and uneven application.

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The two pieces of acetate are then carefully pulled apart from the center out and laid flat.

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Grated coconut was applied, then the acetate placed in a trough to curve slightly.

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Dark chocolate was applied to a piece of acetate, then white chocolate that had been further whitened with some titanium dioxide white colouring, then sprinkled with coconut while still damp. Cuts were made before it fully crystallized to make decorations for the dessert. In some larger demisphere molds the same thing was done, dark chocolate, followed by the white chocolate and then coconut.

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The dessert is removed from the freezer and demolded. The white chocolate glacage is applied.


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The glacage flows so nicely that it makes glazing look so effortless.

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The final result with all the chocolate decorations applied.

Edited by Kerry Beal, 15 February 2008 - 06:42 AM.

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#47 pagosselin

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 09:02 AM

Kerry I have to add my 'THANK YOU' along with everyone else. I always look forward to your post.

I found this funnel but I haven't ordered from them before.

http://www.foodservi...nery_Funnel.htm
Pat

#48 Sebastian

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 02:18 PM

Another option that i've done in the past, is to contact your local vo tech or trade school, ask them if they've got a stainless class that might be interested in making a custom piece to your specifications as an individual project if you pay for the raw materials...

#49 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 02:23 PM

Another option that i've done in the past, is to contact your local vo tech or trade school, ask them if  they've got a stainless class that might be interested in making a custom piece to your specifications as an individual project if you pay for the raw materials...

View Post


What a brilliant idea. You could get them to make all sorts of things.

#50 David J.

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 02:56 PM

Stef was adamant that colours for airbrushing are not simply a mixture of the desired colour and cocoa butter.  His yellow contains yellow dye, some red dye, milk chocolate and cocoa butter.  This gives an excellent yellow.  Red contains red, a bit of blue, dark chocolate and cocoa butter.  He uses the immersion blender to combine the mixture.  The mixture is allowed to sit in the warming cupboard for 24 hours before use.  A bucket of cocoa butter is kept in the 40º C warming cupboard so there is always melted cocoa butter when required. 


How does this compare with the premixed colors from Chef-Rubber?

If it's an improvement, do you have formulas for improving various colors?

#51 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 03:06 PM

Stef was adamant that colours for airbrushing are not simply a mixture of the desired colour and cocoa butter.  His yellow contains yellow dye, some red dye, milk chocolate and cocoa butter.  This gives an excellent yellow.  Red contains red, a bit of blue, dark chocolate and cocoa butter.  He uses the immersion blender to combine the mixture.  The mixture is allowed to sit in the warming cupboard for 24 hours before use.  A bucket of cocoa butter is kept in the 40º C warming cupboard so there is always melted cocoa butter when required. 


How does this compare with the premixed colors from Chef-Rubber?

If it's an improvement, do you have formulas for improving various colors?

View Post

I haven't used the premixed colours myself, I've always mixed my own. I think his mixtures make more complex colours.

The yellow and red were the only two colours we discussed.

#52 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 07:24 PM

A small chocolate showpiece.

Stef put together the parts for the stand and made the rock for this showpiece before we arrived so we didn't get the opportunity to see how those parts were made.

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Half filling some demispheres with chocolate to form the base of one of the flowers.

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As for the decorations for the dessert, a bit of chocolate is piped in strips, a second piece of acetate is applied and the two pulled apart from the center out.

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Rolling up the flower petals to give them a curve. Notice the other petals being made, a knife blade is dipped in the tempered chocolate and pressed down on the acetate. They were sprinkled with a bit of sugar while still damp.

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The flower bases heated on the bottom on a warm cookie sheet to give them a flat surface.

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Similar sized leaf shapes are chosen and applied to some tempered chocolate that has been piped on the top of the base.

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A waterlily like flower is produced after building up the layers of petals.


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Making a base for the showpiece.



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Airbrushing the flowers, using cold spray to speed up the drying process.

At this point I suggested they make use of the spraybooth that was in the room, more eyerolling ensued and before long I was coughing so badly I had to leave the room. I stood outside the glass doors, coughing up a lung, wishing I'd brought an inhaler. I guess the spray booth's purpose is simply to store things.


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To compose this flower a blob of tempered chocolate is put into a plastic petrie dish, and the curved petals added from the bottom layer up.

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Stef piping some shapes into sugar.

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A rock had been molded in sugar and Stef poured out some powdered colours to dab on the rock to colour it. It looked wonderfully like lichen for a while, but then all the colours got mixed and it just ended up a rusty brown.

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Applying the flower to the rock.


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A picture of all the stuff we produced in the 3 days.

#53 John DePaula

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 07:54 PM

Wow, it sounds like they were kinda nasty to you, Kerry. Don't know what's up with that... The spray booth was a good suggestion.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#54 ejw50

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 08:24 PM

Wow, it sounds like they were kinda nasty to you, Kerry.  Don't know what's up with that...  The spray booth was a good suggestion.

View Post



Yeah I agree. Seems they were always rolling their eyes at something or the other.


Some more questions (if you don't mind)


1. On chocolate making and speed. How fast are the "professionals" through each step per mold? Creating shells, piping, backing? I always wonder if I am too slow, especially after seeing Norman Love on Youtube.



2. On the cake height, do you know how his molding cake ring was? The reason I ask is Pierre Herme's book's fruit cakes seem to have 2 layers of cake, cream, some fruit, all in "4.5 cm high rings". That seems a lot for 4.5 cm, but maybe I am missing something.

#55 Beth Wilson

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 09:03 PM

What a wonder of information & pictures! Thanks for sharing your experience with us.

:biggrin:

#56 Kerry Beal

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 04:41 AM

Wow, it sounds like they were kinda nasty to you, Kerry.  Don't know what's up with that...  The spray booth was a good suggestion.

View Post



Yeah I agree. Seems they were always rolling their eyes at something or the other.


Some more questions (if you don't mind)


1. On chocolate making and speed. How fast are the "professionals" through each step per mold? Creating shells, piping, backing? I always wonder if I am too slow, especially after seeing Norman Love on Youtube.



2. On the cake height, do you know how his molding cake ring was? The reason I ask is Pierre Herme's book's fruit cakes seem to have 2 layers of cake, cream, some fruit, all in "4.5 cm high rings". That seems a lot for 4.5 cm, but maybe I am missing something.

View Post

They work pretty fast (and amazingly clean - their whites are still white at the end of the day). The thing is you need to work fast enough that the chocolate isn't able to start setting up before you finish a step. That way while making shells you will be able to get enough excess chocolate out to get the thin shell you want. And on backing off - the chocolate will still be liquid so that after scraping, the remaining chocolate will settle and give a smooth back.

The rings used were likely 4.5 cm as well. The layers of passionfruit cream, pineapple compote and dacquoise were about 1/2 inch to 3/4 of an inch, leaving the remainder to be taken up by the mousse.

#57 Kerry Beal

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 08:58 AM

We took a couple of course related side trips while in Belgium. I had told JC that I wanted to check out a mold place if possible while there so on Tuesday evening we piled into 2 vans and headed off to Antwerp to Chocolate World. They knew we were coming so kept the store open after hours.

I was like a kid in a candy store. I personally spent enough to make it worth their while to stay open. I bought 23 used figural molds - the biggest a huge cow with a ribbon around her neck. I bought at least half a dozen used or reduced plate molds - and the most expensive item - a set of Magyfleur brass forms that you freeze and then dip in chocolate to make leaves and flowers. I picked up a few small odds and ends as well, but didn't buy Fine Chocolates 2 as I knew it should be available from Chocolat-chocolat soon enough. I had wanted a Konigberg cutter for marzipan and when I last priced it it was already pretty expensive. I drew the line at 615 Euro.


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The Konigberg cutter - brought home just the picture.


Thursday, after the course was complete, we headed to Bruge to see the chocolate museum that Mr van Belle, who owns Belcolade, opened.


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Our first stop - a little shop to buy some saucisson sec to have with bagette for lunch later.

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Numerous molded items are available in the shops. I haven't posted the male anatomy pictures I took. I did notice that at Chocolate World you could get polycarbonate versions of anatomically correct molds. Important if you are going to be doing a lot of them I guess.

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Marzipan is also a popular item in shop windows.

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This shop - Chocolate Line - has caused quite a stir in Bruges. The chocolatier strays from the traditional belgian flavours - did I mention that Belgian chocolatiers are a pretty conservative bunch?

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On the wall is an article comparing him to Ferran Adria - I don't know that adding lemon grass to a chocolate or making a pizza flavoured praline would necessarily qualify as molecular gastronomy - but it's really far out for Belgium.

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How to get your chocolates to replicate themselves.


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Saw lots of confit fruits.


Now we moved on to the chocolate museum - lots of old molds - which Mr van Belle collects - as well as old equipment.


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A nice old bain marie used for tempering.

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The first tempering machine.


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Seemed like the perfect Belgian product - chocolate fries.

#58 prairiegirl

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 09:40 AM

Wow, great pictures!! I have a lady who owns a lingerie shop and she wants me to do the "private body part" vchocolates! So the breasts were very interesting and think a good seller. I would love to do those for Valentines next year.

#59 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 01:07 PM

While we were doing our course, the third table in the kitchen was being used by Stephan Leroux, an MOF pastry chef and chocolatier who works for Belcolade. He was working on a series of showpieces that will be featured in a two volume book that is to be published this fall if all goes well. I, for one, will be getting this book when it is available.

We all found ourselves drawn to the work he was doing. It was simply amazing to watch what he could produce. At times he was working with chocolate paste that he made from cocoa powder and cocoa butter, other items he molded. He airbrushed, rubbed chocolate with colour and silk screened. He would paint layers of colour on acetate, then put some chocolate behind, cut lines, then roll it up to dry.

He made a series of white chocolate tubes in acetate, then we watched him transform them into a grove of bamboo, each piece perfect inside and out.

Picture taking was not allowed. Some of his showpieces can be seen on eG here when he was a member of the Belgian team at the World Pastry Team championships. Go to post #55 and look for the belgian team pictures.

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Here is a piece that is in the lobby at Belcolade made by Stephan.

#60 Tri2Cook

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 01:21 PM

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The final result with all the chocolate decorations applied.

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Nice! Sounds more tropical than springtime but still looks and sounds tasty and he can call his dessert whatever he wants to. :raz:
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.





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