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Japanese Knives – What to Buy?

Asian

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244 replies to this topic

#241 ahpadt

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 01:08 PM

First get the whetstones or jigs and learn to sharpen your existing knives. They can achieve new life and sharpness. Then once you have that under your belt and still want a new knife you will be better able to maintain it.

It doesn't matter what knife it is except maybe serrated. They all need sharpening on a somewhat regular basis

 

Probably a good idea. Should I just get a 1000 grit? Are there any major differences from brand to brand? My local store sells MinoSharp and a few other brands.



#242 Dakki

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 01:27 PM

IMO a 1K/3K combi waterstone is probably the best starter. Much finer than that is pointless for stainless, and 3K to 8K is a natural step up for carbon steel (and about the finest you can usefully sharpen at in a kitchen knife) if you go that way, while a 300 or 400 grit is a natural step down from 1K and excellent grits for repairs.

 

There are differences between brands but they not really that significant starting out. A lot of it comes down to personal preference, which is informed by personal experience.


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This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

#243 dcarch

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 08:19 PM

But if you are cheap like me:

 

A D-2 steel blank for $20.00

 

With a few hand tools and a grinder, shaped it to look like a knife.

 

Sent it out to be hardened and cryo tempered for $20.00

 

Sharpened it on a belt sander and stones to razor sharp and glued some scales for the handle.

 

I got myself a 330mm yanagiba for $40.00.

 

As you know, D-2 makes a very nice knife and keeps a razor edge for a long time.

 

 

dcarch



#244 ahpadt

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 12:08 PM

IMO a 1K/3K combi waterstone is probably the best starter. Much finer than that is pointless for stainless, and 3K to 8K is a natural step up for carbon steel (and about the finest you can usefully sharpen at in a kitchen knife) if you go that way, while a 300 or 400 grit is a natural step down from 1K and excellent grits for repairs.

 

There are differences between brands but they not really that significant starting out. A lot of it comes down to personal preference, which is informed by personal experience.

 

Unfortunately I havent had much luck in finding a 1k/3k combi stone. I've had a look around the web and my local kitchen supplier. The only thing I found on the web was a couple of noname stones. Also being an electronics enthusiast, I am very sceptical about 'brandless' items. Do you have a specfic combistone or brand to recommend that is somewhat easily available? I am located in the UK.



#245 irodguy

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 08:38 PM

I own many Japanese knives.  I just purchased one recently on a recommendation from a friend.  http://www.amazon.co...0_26725410_item

 

I must say the Zhen is very well balanced with a very reasonable weight.   It a great Usaba at a really good price.


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