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Middle Eastern Desserts/Sweets

Dessert

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110 replies to this topic

#91 Swisskaese

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 05:33 AM

I came across an amazing baklava from Syria. A friend who came back from Lebanon brought me a box back.  Mrs zeitoun and I ate the whole box in 3 days.
Fortunately, they have a website:

http://www.alfaisalsweets.com/

Even more fortunate, they ship abroad!!!

They specialize in all sorts of Middle eastern pastries, not just baklava.  Is anyone familiar with them?

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Wow! Those look amazing, especially the keshta sweets. You think they would ship here? :wink:

Someday, I hope I can go there and try them myself.

Are the Ghoraiba similiar to Mamoul, but filled with cream instead of dates or walnut filling?

Does anyone have a recipe for the fatayr bi-sbanigh. How do you make the pastry?

I would weigh 200kg if I lived in Tripoli. Both pastry shops look fabulous.

Edited by Swisskaese, 11 December 2004 - 06:38 AM.


#92 Behemoth

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 09:11 AM

Does anyone have a recipe for the fatayr bi-sbanigh. How do you make the pastry?


The pastry is just your basic pita bread dough/pizza dough, rolled out to about 1/8 inch thickness after first rising. Cut into circles, stuff and fold into the triangle shape. Bake as you would pizza, at very high heat (about 425 or so) or fry in time-honored middle eastern granny tradition. Now that I think of it, I wonder if the Peter Reinhardt formula for slow-rising pizza dough would be an improvement. Hmm, worth trying.

Maybe someone has a more precise recipe for the filling, but I usually improvise. It is basically chopped spinach or chard, chopped green onions, mint and parsley, zaatar, lebanese spice mixture, raisins or toasted pine nuts, a little lemon juice or pomegranate molasses, salt & olive oil. Dry enough to not leak, wet enough to steam the spinach.

#93 AmyDaniel

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 06:30 PM

Interestingly, even though Titan Foods is a Greek market, I think they use the rosewater syrup in their baklava. But for the sake of all of you, I am willing to make the sacrifice and get out to Queens so that I can make the most informed assessment possible. I know, I know, it will be difficult, but for egullet and the sake of research, how could I not?

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Hmmmm, I'm gonna be in that area tomorrow morning/afternoon - I'm checking out a bakery and some of the Egyptian joints on Steinway St., but I have time to do some baklava research as well... :biggrin:

Amy

#94 Behemoth

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 08:21 PM

Hey did anyone notice the Hallab site has a recipe for Kashta?

Recipe (Click on the photo to see the recipe.) The english is a little weird, some translation might be needed. Presumably the "toast bread" is just half a slice of white bread with crust cut off. Do you think the corn flour is really supposed to be fine corn meal? Or corn starch? (I vote for the latter, but what do I know.)

Anyway, here is an old Kashta recipe give to me by a family member, it seems more "echt" to me somehow:

1 litre whole milk
0.25 litres cream

Mix milk and cream in a broad shallow pan on a stove. Bring slowly to a boil, then turn the heat as low as possible and allow the mixture to stand over it for half an hour.

Turn off the heat, cover and leave the mixture to stand for 8 (8!!) hours before refrigerating. Place in the refrigerator for another 8 hours.

With a knife, detach the thick layer of cream lift it off the top of the milk. Divvy up as needed.
---------------------------------------------------------------------

I've been warned that you have to throw out the leftover milk for some reason I can't comprehend, apart from the fact that it has sat out for 8 whole hours. I've never made this because I never think of it 16 hours in advance and I am a big baby about waiting.

My guess is for znoud el-sit, you seal filo dough around the cream, bake it at some absurdly high temperature and then soak it in attar while it's still hot. Any idea what baking temp would work? Filo usually needs about 40 minutes at 400 degrees, think the cream survive that long? (though basically it should have the consistency of fairly dry goat cheese.) Or maybe start it low then crank it up??

Edited by Behemoth, 12 December 2004 - 01:26 PM.


#95 FoodMan

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 12:34 PM

I came across an amazing baklava from Syria. A friend who came back from Lebanon brought me a box back.  Mrs zeitoun and I ate the whole box in 3 days.
Fortunately, they have a website:

http://www.alfaisalsweets.com/

Even more fortunate, they ship abroad!!!

They specialize in all sorts of Middle eastern pastries, not just baklava.  Is anyone familiar with them?

View Post


Wow! Those look amazing, especially the keshta sweets. You think they would ship here? :wink:

Someday, I hope I can go there and try them myself.

Are the Ghoraiba similiar to Mamoul, but filled with cream instead of dates or walnut filling?

Does anyone have a recipe for the fatayr bi-sbanigh. How do you make the pastry?

I would weigh 200kg if I lived in Tripoli. Both pastry shops look fabulous.

View Post


The Ghoraiba is a cookie that is not stuffed, it usually is very buttery and crumbly, kind of like short bread.

For the fatayr bi-sbanigh, Behemoth pretty much summed it up. You can use any bread dough for the pastry (The pita bread dough in my eGCI class will work fine). For the filling, I would add the stop of salting and draining the spinach. My mom does that and it leaches some water out of the spinach and removes some of the astringency that could in the leaves. Just chop, salt, let drain for about an hour then wash and squeeze dry. As falvoring I am very partial to pomegranate molasses and chopped walnuts for the filling.


But this is material for a Lebanese street food thread. Do ka'k vendors even exist anymore?

Thankfully, they still do. :smile:


Behemoth, znood el sit are usually fried not baked and then soaked in syrup.

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#96 Behemoth

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 01:27 PM

Behemoth, znood el sit are usually fried not baked and then soaked in syrup.

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God, that is diabolical. No wonder they are so freakin' good.

#97 M. Lucia

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 06:23 PM

Oh my. I have neglected this thread, and maybe that's a good thing because you all are making me drool. Hooray for spinach fatayer as well. I have to confess a weakness for the pine nut finger baklava but I am not too fond of the cream filled stuff. Living by Taj al-Malouk in Beirut was dangerous.

Did anyone notice the diet stuff on Abdul Rahman Hallab? They even have diet syrup-yikes!
I have only ever made ghourabiya and nammoura at home.
Maybe I should forgo the usual holiday goodies and bake some of those, or just make a trip out to Atlantic Ave.

However, I haven't had middle eastern pastries in the U.S. that add up to those in the ME (I've tried a couple local places and Shatila). Do you all (in the U.S.) order from abroad or locally?

#98 Pan

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 12:05 AM

You know you have to recommend your favorite places on Atlantic Av. now, right? [sly grin]

#99 M. Lucia

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Posted 16 December 2004 - 12:28 PM

Damascus Bakery.
Also Oriental Pastry Shop and Sahadis.

#100 Pan

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Posted 16 December 2004 - 01:29 PM

Thanks, M.

#101 M. Lucia

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Posted 16 December 2004 - 07:11 PM

I was going through some files, and found this picture I thought you all might appreciate.
Posted Image
I think this was in Saida, and the subject is senioura: a special sweet biscuit they make there.
I found the pastries I sampled in Saida to be exceedingly sweet- certainly the sweetest I'd ever had, which is apparently what they are known for.

#102 rajsuman

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Posted 18 December 2004 - 05:56 PM

I own a book called Patisserie of the Eastern Mediterranean by Arto Der Hariutunian. which has great photos in it of most all of the recipes.  Might answer many of your questions.

http://www.amazon.co...4/egulletcom-20

I think I've built an eGullet friendly link here.  :unsure:

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Thanks for the link Katie! I want that book! Are the recipes any good? Arabic sweets are my absolute favourite and now I'm drooling all over my keyboard. What are you people doing to me? It's nearly 1 am and I feel like having some baklava right now! I guess I'll go downstairs and open a can of condensed milk. :wub:

I always thought that jalebis were a totally Indian sweet until I browsed Nigella Lawson's Feast at a bookstore recently. She gives a recipe for it, but calls it the mid-eastern zallobie or some such thing. Would any of you know alternative spellings for the same?

Great pics, BTW! Makes me want to go to Dubai this instant and set up camp inside one of those cafes cum sweetshops.

#103 FoodMan

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Posted 19 December 2004 - 09:52 PM

I always thought that jalebis were a totally Indian sweet until I browsed Nigella Lawson's Feast at a bookstore recently. She gives a recipe for it, but calls it the mid-eastern zallobie or some such thing. Would any of you know alternative spellings for the same?


You might find it under various names including "Zalabiya", "lokmat El Kadi", "aawaymat". All of these are pieces of fried sweet dough soaked in syrup.

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contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com


#104 Nicolai

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 03:44 AM

That was my late breakfast today.

 

Halawet el Jebn with Ashta and sprinkling of crushed Pistachios.

 

 

 

[attachment=33473:_DSC6901 1.jpg]


Edited by Nicolai, 16 July 2013 - 03:49 AM.

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#105 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 06:00 AM

But what is it?

#106 Nicolai

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 02:15 PM

It is a Levant sweet originated in Hama - Syria.

 

It is a dough of 2 basic ingredients namely Semolina and White fresh cheese and of course sugar syrup.

The best part is the stretching....

 

You can see it here:

 


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#107 heidih

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 04:05 PM

Wow - and I thought I was "all that" when I pulled and stretched my own strudel dough. It is lovely to watch masters of a specific art at work. My French is a bit rusty but I assume the clear liquid being ladled over the top (as when the giant dome was created) is the sugar syrup. I enjoy the taste of pistachios but you also have to admit that the color just makes the pastries even more swoon worthy.
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#108 Nicolai

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 04:49 PM

You definitely have to try it at least once in your life.

Yes, the liquid is Sugar Syrup.

 

The video is from the Hallab Sweets in Tripoli.

I was with one of the Hallab brothers this evening (not in Tripoli) and I showed him the pic on egullet which got him thrilled.

 

Hallab are one of the Levant Sweets masters with a long history behind the brand.

Their sweets are to die for.

 

Maybe I do a photoshoot with the prep of few recipes.

 

The better Halawet el Jebn can be found in Hama - Syria and the best of the best in Aleppo - Syria.

The Aleppo version is viciously delectable as they incorporate split Pistachios in the mix and hang the sheets out to dry and of course they use Lamb ghee instead of butter.

 

But Hallab did up the ante and are now producing another version which is Halawet el Rez by replacing Semolina with Rice powder which makes the whole paste lighter and exremely tasty.


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#109 Hassouni

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 06:18 PM

Of ya yaba Hallaaaab! 

 

Best sweet shop in the world. And one of the best desserts in the world! I never knew how they made the wrapping - and I've never seen the layered style, only the wrapped, across Lebanon and even at Hallab in Trablus.

 

So did you make it from scratch Nicolai?



#110 IAte

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 05:32 AM

OMG I've never seen how it's made. Amazing. So true, it's so nice to watch master at work. :shock:

Thanks for sharing!


Be sweety - visit my blog BestCupCakeSecrets.com :blush: :wub:


#111 Snadra

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 01:52 PM

The Aleppo version is viciously delectable as they incorporate split Pistachios in the mix and hang the sheets out to dry and of course they use Lamb ghee instead of butter.


This looks incredible.

And the words 'viciously delectable' are so perfectly descriptive!





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