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Middle Eastern Desserts/Sweets

Dessert

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110 replies to this topic

#31 Suvir Saran

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Posted 28 September 2002 - 03:05 PM

I found the recipe in gourmet last year. It's delicious, I make it all the time to have with tea. I also like to make a glaze flavored with orange juice and zest to spread over it. I'm sure you could whip up a nice rose water glaze.

3/4 cup shelled natural pistachios (4 oz)
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons ground cardamom
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup whole milk (2% works well too)
1/4 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter, softened
1 cup sugar
3 large eggs

Preheat oven to 350°F.
Butter a 9 by 6 pan, then line bottom with wax paper. Butter/flour routine.

Pulse the pistachios in a food processor until finely ground, I've also bought ground pistachios and it's worked well too.

Add the flour, baking powder, cardamom, and salt and pulse once or twice to mix.

Cream the butter and sugar with an electric mixer until pale and fluffy. Add the eggs 1 at a time (beating after each addition).

Then add the milk and vanilla, mix well, then add the flour and beat till combined.

Spread the atter evenly in cake pan and bake in middle of oven til the tester comes out clean, should take about 20 minutes.

Cool the cake in the pan for roughly 10 minutes and flip it out onto a platter. Glaze it if you wish. It doesn't need much, just enough for a beautiful sheen.

It's excellent warm (if you can't wait) but it's delicious at room temperature.

Enjoy.  :smile:

I did everything by the recipe.
The cake has been in the oven for over 25 minutes.
It is still trembling and not cooked.
What did I do wrong?
What to do? :shock:

#32 Suvir Saran

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Posted 28 September 2002 - 03:17 PM

35 minutes later... it is still trembling. That pistachio cake that is.

#33 mixmaster b

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Posted 28 September 2002 - 10:28 PM

Survir-

Good luck with the cake! I hope it stops jiggling.

I have been making a lovely pistachio brittle I found on epicurious. It is not identified as Middle Eastern, but it does have pistachios. The taste reminds me of those clear, rectangular sesame candies you get in healthfood stores, only better. I thought it might work as a garnish for another dessert, or possible a post-dessert nibble with coffee.

Here is the link:

http://www.epicuriou.../view?id=102704

I like to chop the pistachios in half before adding them, so the fresh green color is more visible.

Please tell us what you make!

#34 CathyL

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Posted 29 September 2002 - 06:46 AM

Suvir, what size baking pan did you use?

#35 Suvir Saran

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Posted 29 September 2002 - 08:04 AM

Suvir, what size baking pan did you use?

9 x 6

#36 Suvir Saran

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Posted 29 September 2002 - 08:10 AM

Good luck with the cake!  I hope it stops jiggling.

The cake stopped jiggling. I had it baking for 45-50 minutes.
It became a nice beautiful brown by the end of it. Moist yet perfectly cooked so the skewer I put in came out clean.
It was a huge success.
I owe many thanks to every on here and most especially to mhadam.
The cake has the most amazing texture and a captivating and enticing aroma. All through dinner, our friends were greedily awaiting dessert time.

I had made my signature lemon poppy seed cake and the pistachio cake.

My favorite was the pistachio. Thanks mhadam!

#37 Suvir Saran

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Posted 30 September 2002 - 07:58 AM

I must thank mhadam for a wonderful recipe and suggestion.
My host called to ask me for the recipe. She loved the cake.

Also my thanks to all that posted ideas. I will use them in the weeks to come. Thanks!

#38 mhadam

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Posted 30 September 2002 - 07:59 AM

*cheer* I'm glad it turned out wonderful and that everyone enjoyed it.

:laugh:
There's a yummy in my tummy.

#39 Suvir Saran

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Posted 30 September 2002 - 09:55 AM

A question for the trained pastry chefs and bakers...
I made the pistachio cake.. It came out amazing.... I have been hearing about it ever since... everyone loved it.. The beautiful aroma of the cardamom against the pistachio oil is brilliant.. It was emanating all through the meal.

The cake was baked in a bread pan (9x6), and the finished cake had a slight crack in the center. How can one avoid that? What did I do wrong? It baked perfectly (well it took much more time than what the magazine wrote) and tasted Grand and has an Amazing texture. But just aesthetically, it had that one fine crack that was around 5 inches long.. Not wide at all.

Any tips?

#40 Suvir Saran

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Posted 30 September 2002 - 10:01 AM

I am baking two batches of this for an event I am hosting at home tonight.
If there is anyone with ideas about how I can fix that one very small issue... I would be glad to hear those tips... :smile:

#41 CathyL

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Posted 30 September 2002 - 10:47 AM

The crack is characteristic of baking powder breads - I've never made one that didn't have it.

The version of the Gourmet recipe on Epicurious (click) calls for a 9x13 pan, which would account for the longer baking time you needed. The cake probably wouldn't crack in the larger pan, but it wouldn't be as attractive. It does sound lovely - I like mhadam's suggestion of a rose water glaze.

#42 Suvir Saran

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Posted 30 September 2002 - 10:50 AM

The crack is characteristic of baking powder breads - I've never made one that didn't have it.

The version of the Gourmet recipe on Epicurious (click) calls for a 9x13 pan, which would account for the longer baking time you needed.  The cake probably wouldn't crack in the larger pan, but it wouldn't be as attractive.  It does sound lovely - I like mhadam's suggestion of a rose water glaze.

Thanks Cathy!
I agree the cake would not look attractive in the 9x13 pan... I will stick with the 9x6 and the small crack. It is far more attractive to the alternate.
And the size of the pan explains the difference in baking time.
Thanks! :smile:

#43 Rhea_S

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Posted 30 September 2002 - 10:55 AM

I'm glad your middle eastern dessert was a success, Suvir. Galaktoboureko is basically a semolina custard wrapped in filo. I've had it wrapped eggroll style, layered like baklava or in purses. Greek and Turkish acquaintances sometimes enhance the basic recipe by adding chopped pistachios to the custard or adding rosewater to the glazing syrup.

#44 Suvir Saran

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Posted 30 September 2002 - 11:02 AM

I'm glad your middle eastern dessert was a success, Suvir. Galaktoboureko is basically a semolina custard wrapped in filo. I've had it wrapped eggroll style, layered like baklava or in purses. Greek and Turkish acquaintances sometimes enhance the basic recipe by adding chopped pistachios to the custard or adding rosewater to the glazing syrup.

Thanks Rhea_S!

You know, in India we make a halwa out of semolina (Sooji Halwa) that is very similar to what you speak about.
Also there are certain communities in Northern India where they make Gujias differently from the rest. Gujjia is a sweet turnover pastry. It is stuffed usually with Khoya (evaporated milk fudge) and dried fruits and nuts. In some communities, they stuff it with a semolina halwa like what you describe.
In fact at Tamarind, they were serving an awful version of it. I had a better version that was served all of a few days... but the management decided not to use the pastry chefs better skills at making this dessert and instead kept the poor recipe given by the chef.
But when Gujiia is made well, they are delicious.
In India we deep fry gujjia.

#45 High Priestess

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Posted 30 September 2002 - 11:53 AM

Hi, Suvrir. I recently served Coffee-Cardamom Pots de Creme for dessert at one of my dinner parties; they were elegant and soulful at the same time. To me, anyway. I think they would be excellent for your friend's party. The recipe is in Daniel Boulud's cookbook.

#46 Suvir Saran

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Posted 30 September 2002 - 12:22 PM

Hi, Suvir.  I recently served Coffee-Cardamom Pots de Creme for dessert at one of my dinner parties; they were elegant and soulful at the same time.  To me, anyway.  I think they would be excellent for your friend's party.  The recipe is in Daniel Boulud's cookbook.

I am not sure I have his cookbook.. I think I do. I think I even remember the cover... I hope I did not gift it away...
If I cannot find it, I will go buy a copy. I love pots de creme. I make one that I will share in my own cookbook. I made it first as a young teen.
Always had a soft spot for pots de creme. :smile:

#47 kitwilliams

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Posted 01 October 2002 - 09:04 PM

Foodman:

Don't know if mhadam got in touch w/you directly, but I found my copy of the Pistachio Cake (which I make often and everyone adores) which I had found on Epicurious. Although it is simply called "Pistachio Cake" I had written "Iranian" above the title. I am assuming that I did see it in Gourmet and that it stated that it was an Iranian recipe. As my short term memory sucks, that's the best I can do for you except for the fact that I served it to an Iraqi friend of mine and he said it reminded him of his childhood.

Let me know if you have heard otherwise.

kit
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#48 Suvir Saran

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Posted 01 October 2002 - 10:21 PM

Foodman:

Don't know if mhadam got in touch w/you directly, but I found my copy of the Pistachio Cake (which I make often and everyone adores) which I had found on Epicurious.  Although it is simply called "Pistachio Cake" I had written "Iranian" above the title.  I am assuming that I did see it in Gourmet and that it stated that it was an Iranian recipe.  As my short term memory sucks, that's the best I can do for you except for the fact that I served it to an Iraqi friend of mine and he said it reminded him of his childhood.

Let me know if you have heard otherwise.

kit

I have made it three times now.
I cannot thank mhadam enough for having introduced me to this wonderful cake.
It is the most amazing aromatic and tasty cake I have had. I have had far too many cakes that are flavorful but do not come out being tasty.. simply as spicy, over spiced cakes... This cake is most subtle and yet so full in flavor. It is amazing. It could be Middle Eastern, Iranian, Iraqi, Indian or Sri Lankan.. it would go well with any food and at any time.

I would be very curious myself to know how the magazine got to that recipe. And who the first person to come up with this combination was. It is spectacular.

#49 torakris

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Posted 19 October 2002 - 06:04 PM

I made the pistachio cake last night for a small party with some friends and it was the talk of the party! It was one of the best cakes I have ever eaten.
Thank you so much.

I actually made it as a cake in a 9 inch spring form pan and it cooked to perfection in 30 minutes.
My only problem was that I didn't have ground cardamom, so I ground the whole pods in a spice blender, but the outer green shell didn't get very well ground so I poured it through a seive. It tasted great, but how do you grind cardamom yourself? Do you remove the black seeds and just grind those?

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#50 polly

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Posted 19 October 2002 - 06:33 PM

how do you grind cardamom yourself? Do you remove the black seeds and just grind those?

Exactly right.
Just lightly bash (if those last two words aren't mutually exclusive) the whole pods to break them open, and flip out the black seeds.
Then into a spice grinder or mortar and pestle.
How sad; a house full of condiments and no food.

#51 Shiewie

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 03:21 AM

Have some pics of some pastries from a little pastry shop in the oasis town of Wadi Musa (next to Petra) during a recent trip to Jordan and Egypt.

Apart from baklava (the first picture), I'm not sure what the rest are called. We just pointed excitedly at what we wanted. Can somebody please help me identify them?

Some of my favourites were these filo pastry casings with a cream cheese filling (sweet ones and savoury ones) and also crescent-shaped shortbread like ones, either plain or with a date filling. Yumm! Would anyone possibly have recipes for these (:biggrin: hopeful)?

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#52 spaghetttti

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 06:46 AM

Absolutely gorgeous mouthwatering photos, Shiewie! They're making me hungry!!! :raz: Though I've had some of them, not too familiar with their names, I'm sure someone here will be able to identify and provide recipes for the pastries!
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#53 FoodMan

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 09:05 AM

I just have to thank you for posting these wonderfull pics. I will take some time to look at them and hopefully have some identification for you.

Elie

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#54 Jason Perlow

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 09:14 AM

They're all called different things in different Middle Eastern countries. The ones with the shredded wheat birds-nesty type things are usually called Kataifi. Everything else is usually some variant of baklava using a honey syrup sauce with different kinds of nuts as a filling or topping. Theres probably a least a dozen different variants. In turkey they are called Baklava generically, theres one particular pistachio round one they call "Bulbul Yuvasi" that looks kind of similar to one of the pistachio ones above.
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#55 tryska

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 10:01 AM

are the red/green/yellow jellied things with nuts in them called Halva, or is that my fevered toddler imagination?


(not that there's any pictures of those anywhere here, but i've been trying to locate those particular sweets here, and i was introduced to them in Saudi Arabia)

#56 FoodMan

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 10:39 AM

I would agree with Jason, the names I might give them might vary wildly from the ones used in Egypt, Israel or Turkey. The generic name for pretty much all of them in Lebanon is Baklawa.


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Thi si what is classically called Baklawa (Baklava)

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That very first one with cream I think is called "Ithmaliya with Ashta(cream)". I cannot really tell what the ones in the background are.

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The closest one is "Barma bil Fustuk Halabi" (Barama with Pistachios). This could also be fille dwith pine nuts and will then be called..you guessed it Barama with Pinenuts.
The one right behind it is made with shredded phyllo soaked in rosewater and orange blossom water and filled with pistachios. This is called "Bullawriya", roughly translated as "crystal" due to it's color. I am not too crazy about this one and it is a little too sweet and chewy for my taste.

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I am not too sure but I think the top tray all the way in the front is called "Mamduda bil Fustuk Halabi" Semolina, sugar dough filled with pistachios and topped with another layer of dough.

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I do not know what the very first tray is, but the second one goes byt either "Namourra" or "Herissa"


I'll update the names if I learn anything else.

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#57 Behemoth

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 07:56 PM

That last one could be the gummy thing with pistachios. I have no idea what its called.

Oh, its not cream cheese BTW, I think the filling is more like clotted cream. I really miss two things I can't seem to get anywhere: "Znoud el sit", a sort of clotted cream-filled pastry cigar, and "ktaif" (I think?) which are little pancakes usually eaten with the cream and sugar syrup. Are those just a Tripoli thing? Man are those good.

I have some candied orange blossoms my folks sent to me. Also some ktaifi dough. What should I make....

#58 Shiewie

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 08:44 PM

Thanks folks for all your help, especially FoodMan for painstakingly looking at all the pastries in each picture.

#59 FoodMan

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 10:19 PM

That last one could be the gummy thing with pistachios. I have no idea what its called.

Oh, its not cream cheese BTW, I think the filling is more like clotted cream. I really miss two things I can't seem to get anywhere: "Znoud el sit", a sort of clotted cream-filled pastry cigar, and "ktaif" (I think?) which are little pancakes usually eaten with the cream and sugar syrup. Are those just a Tripoli thing? Man are those good.

I have some candied orange blossoms my folks sent to me. Also some ktaifi dough. What should I make....

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Those gummy pistachio things are called "Herissa Bil Fustuk" or Pistachio Herissa.

Kataiif or Ataiif as well as Znood El Sit are wonderful things. Here are some pics I took of Kataiif I made a while back. The holes in the "pancakes" were a little too big which means I need to make the batter a little firmer next time. Boy am I craving those now.

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Elie

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#60 Swisskaese

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 05:16 AM

Hi Elie,

I had some homemade Kataiif a few weeks ago. They were wonderful. Just sweet enough. The clotted cream filling was not very sweet, which I prefer because the sugar syrup makes up for the unsweetened cream. What do you fill yours with?

It was a party I went to before Ramadan and Hisham, the chef, also makes the most amazing cheese rolls with whole zatar leaves that he picks on the hills near his home.

He also makes amazing Maklooba, but that is another thread all together.

Take care,

Michelle

Edited by Swisskaese, 19 November 2004 - 05:25 AM.






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