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Filipino Food Is Fantastic!


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#271 Ce'nedra

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 09:14 PM

I'm really looking forward to tryin sizzling sisig one day. Is there a good ol' reliable recipe for it online? Would I need a sizzling plate fo it (certainly would be better aye)?
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#272 jumanggy

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 08:36 PM

You can take a gander (or a hog) at the cooking procedure market-man outlined here:
http://www.marketman...s-nose-and-ears
and see if it sounds feasible.
I'm not really a fan (though I do eat it occasionally), so I've no idea what the best recipe is-- it seems the best is always at the local grill-and-bar :) If you have a cast iron pan, heating it blazingly hot should work. Sizzling plates are not that expensive here-- though they are still very dangerous things on the table! :)
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#273 Ce'nedra

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 10:34 PM

Umm I have something to confess. I just realised it was made of a pig's face...I'm not too sure that I'm ready to prepare something like that.......it looks like I'll just have it out.....................but thank you :)

Edited by Ce'nedra, 02 November 2008 - 10:35 PM.

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#274 David A. Goldfarb

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Posted 15 October 2009 - 05:53 PM

My wife was jonesing for laing (taro leaves) after reading this review of Engeline's Filipino restaurant in Queens (we've been there) a few days ago in the New York Times, and yesterday I happened to be checking out an Asian market I hadn't visited before and found Lucia's dried taro leaves imported from the Phillipines, and I think this is my favorite new ingredient. I've made fresh taro leaves before in Hawai'i, but these dried leaves have a smoky flavor. They don't seem heavily smoked, so maybe the drying process is just finished over fire. They're also not too expensive (about $2.50 for a 14 oz bag) and look like they can be stored indefinitely on the shelf. Though the label, mysteriously, says "keep refrigerated," they're certainly not refrigerated in the market. They can be prepared pretty much like spinach or other greens, but since they're dried, cooking time doesn't have to be long.

I made them more Indian style than Filipino, browning chunks of carrot, potato, onion and chicken in ghee with some salt, pepper, garlic, bay leaf, and eventually garam masala, then I added about a quart of chicken consomme and some water and the taro leaves, simmering and adding water as needed. The butter, stock, garam masala, and the smoky flavor of the taro leaves worked very nicely together.

Edited by David A. Goldfarb, 15 October 2009 - 05:54 PM.


#275 Anna N

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 07:01 PM

Almost 4 years since the last post on this topic. In that time has anyone published a "must have" book on Filipino cuisine? I am currently reading "Memories of Philippine Kitchens" but it is a bit cheffy (naturally since the authors own a restaurant!).
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#276 heidih

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 08:21 PM

The recently published The Adobo Road has been well reviewed



#277 nickrey

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 10:58 PM

One upcoming title in Filipino cooking is "7000 Islands." Description here.

 

Amazon pre-order here.


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#278 prasantrin

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 07:28 AM

Any of the cookbooks by Nora Daza or Violeta Noriega are pretty much standards (the newest of their books is probably about 20 years old, but the Daza ones are really quite old and have gone through many printings). They're not the best written recipes (or the best quality books in terms of paper and binding), but the end results are pretty much what Filipinos eat. IIRC they're written for a Filipino audience, so some of the ingredients they use are called by their Filipino names. But most should still be available in Canada.

 

I think I have all all the books written by both, but I can't seem to find them. Probably in storage.


Edited by prasantrin, 25 August 2013 - 07:34 AM.


#279 prasantrin

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 07:31 AM

There's also Kulinarya which is more modern, but still offers traditional recipes. It's for the posh Filipino market.

 

(Actually, pretty much all Filipino cookbooks not published for the western market (such as those mentioned by others) are for the more posh Filipino market. Regular Filipino folks can't afford to waste money on cookbooks, nor can they afford to buy most of the ingredients mentioned.)

 

eta: I think my mother gave a copy of this book to Kerry--maybe she'll share it!


Edited by prasantrin, 25 August 2013 - 07:40 AM.


#280 Anna N

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 03:32 PM

There's also Kulinarya which is more modern, but still offers traditional recipes. It's for the posh Filipino market.
 
(Actually, pretty much all Filipino cookbooks not published for the western market (such as those mentioned by others) are for the more posh Filipino market. Regular Filipino folks can't afford to waste money on cookbooks, nor can they afford to buy most of the ingredients mentioned.)
 
eta: I think my mother gave a copy of this book to Kerry--maybe she'll share it!


Thanks for your recommendations. Kerry has lent me the Kulinarya so I will be digging into that this coming week.
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#281 Jaymes

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 12:09 PM

Having lived for several years in the Philippines, I certainly developed a fondness for many of their dishes.  Lumpia, of course.  Pancit.  Adobo.  And many others.

 

I've bought several Filipino cookbooks, but they didn't really "do it" for me, for some reason.

 

So I've ordered "The Adobo Road," with heightened expectations.

 

And, just in case, "The Filipino-American Kitchen," too. 

 

I do have a Filipino market & restaurant pretty close to my house, but I'm hopeful that "The Filipino-American Kitchen" will give me substitutes for some ingredients that I've had a difficult time sourcing.

 

Amazon link Filipino-American Kitchen



#282 prasantrin

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 02:39 PM

What kind of ingredients do you have trouble getting?

 

The only thing we really have trouble with is calamansi. We can get most other stuff, though in varying qualities.



#283 Jaymes

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 03:47 PM

What kind of ingredients do you have trouble getting?
 
The only thing we really have trouble with is calamansi. We can get most other stuff, though in varying qualities.


Ah, calamansi. The one thing I never have trouble getting. Always have at least two or three trees full of fruit. Even when we lived in Alaska. Can't be without that. Want me to send you some?

#284 patrickamory

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 06:36 PM

Calamansi is impossible to find in New York as well!



#285 Jaymes

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 07:17 PM

Calamansi is impossible to find in New York as well!


Well, hey, I'll send you some, too. But I can't believe you can't grow them in pots. Try an Asian nursery, or order one (or two) online.

#286 patrickamory

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 07:23 PM

Thanks Jaymes! I'll try it next summer. Inside won't work because there's no room that gets enough sun.



#287 Jaymes

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 12:14 PM

Thanks Jaymes! I'll try it next summer. Inside won't work because there's no room that gets enough sun.

 

They're very easy and fun to grow.  They look beautiful and smell even better.  Think you'll love having a pot or two.  And I'm serious about sending you a box of some fruit.  My trees are loaded.  They're green now...not sure whether you prefer them green or orange.  But if you want some, pm me.


Edited by Jaymes, 28 August 2013 - 12:16 PM.

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#288 Jaymes

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 01:29 PM

Thanks Jaymes! I'll try it next summer. Inside won't work because there's no room that gets enough sun.

 

I have a suggestion for anyone that doesn't have a spot to grow a potted plant.  If you don't have a sunny balcony, or fire-escape, or patio, or other place to keep your potted calamansi in the summer, and a sunny window or "grow light" to keep it in the winter, I think you should consider your friends and family.  Surely at least one of them does enjoy growing plants.  And if I were you, I'd gift them with a couple of calamansi trees.  As I said above, they're beautiful and easy to grow.  I'd think your "green thumb" friend or relative will enjoy growing calamansi, and you'll have a ready supply.

 

My son has done that with Keffir Lime.  Although space isn't an issue for him, he can't seem to keep plants alive.  But he's a great cook and particularly enjoys Thai recipes.  So he bought me a Keffir Lime tree.  It's thriving.  And he harvests the leaves every time he comes for a visit.



#289 prasantrin

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 09:26 AM

What kind of ingredients do you have trouble getting?
 
The only thing we really have trouble with is calamansi. We can get most other stuff, though in varying qualities.


Ah, calamansi. The one thing I never have trouble getting. Always have at least two or three trees full of fruit. Even when we lived in Alaska. Can't be without that. Want me to send you some?

 

Thank you for the offer! While I'm pretty sure they could be imported to Canada (no citrus industry here, so not much worry about bugs and stuff that might destroy our non-existent citrus industry), it's so hot right now I'm not sure they'd survive the trip!

 

I wonder if I can get a plant here. Our winters are so harsh, though, and I'm not sure it will be warm enough, even indoors.



#290 loki

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:27 PM

I've grown Calamansi and it's one of the easier citrus to grow.  I think it has some hardiness and adaptability it it's genes being subjected to all the assaults of insect and tropical conditions of the Philippines. If you can keep it cool - really cool actually, in the 40's or so, in the winter, you don't need really bright light. I've put them in a west window in an unheated room. Make sure they are not waterlogged. Put them out slowly (expose them for ever longer periods of direct light) once it warms up outside. I lost mine to careless under-watering while on a trip.  They are actually a bit more hardy than many citrus fruits and can survive frosts better than oranges, even though they are most common in tropical areas, namely the Philippines.



#291 huiray

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 11:46 PM

In fact, I believe at least one US supplier of the plant (Calmondin, that is, or Calamansi as discussed here) states that it is hardy down to 20ºF (that's 20 degrees Fahrenheit), if I remember correctly.

 

@patrickamory, if you do try that shop on Mulberry (Asia Market Corp) in NYC to seek out calamansi one day, in addition to the Chinese name I mentioned on the "Dinner" thread you might also try asking for it in Malay - "limau kasturi" or "limau kesturi"- as I seem to remember some folks there speaking Malay some years ago.

 

(To reiterate, calamansi is not used *just* in Filipino food - it is widely used in SE Asia...Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, etc...alongside other limes like kaffir limes (limau perut, in Malay) or the equivalent of Key Limes (limau nipis, in Malay))


Edited by huiray, 11 September 2013 - 11:52 PM.


#292 patrickamory

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 10:37 PM

Jaymes unexpectedly sent me a present of another box of calamansi. I don't think either of the dishes I'm about to show here are orthodox Filipino cuisine, but she asked that I post them in the Filipino thread, so here they are. I will say her calamansi are fantastic, even better this time, and I do like to devour them fresh, rind and all.

 

Here are the calamansi as they arrived:

 

calamansi_zps4b2806e2.jpg

 

Spinach with calamansi dressing and dried shrimp:

 

spinach_calamansi_zpsc54f380a.jpg

 

Chicken adobo. I used calamansi juice in place of most of the vinegar usually specified. Marinated overnight. So much fuller and fruitier than adobos I've made in the past using pure vinegar.

 

adobo_zpsf5d8bacd.jpg


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#293 jsager01

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 02:17 PM

i have a calamansi plant grown in a pot for at least 3 years now, have a look at the pic in http://forums.egulle...si#entry1935265

 

as already pointed out earlier, the calamansi is a multi purpose plant, especially when grown indoors, ie it supplies fruit ( much more than i can use or give away), looks fantastic with its shiny green leaves, and lemony fragrance that wafts across the room  when in bloom. It is one of the easiest citrus to grow indoors.

 

i keep all my plants  in the living room/office of my apartment, and in winter that is usually kept between 12 to 20 C, no grow lights,  they survive like i do. I used to put them out in the balcony in summer, but its too much trouble and for the past 2 years, they are indoors all year.

 

as for the problems with keeping keffir limes alive, it could be that the plant was grown from seed, or cuttings. . Get a plant that has been grafted  on virus resistant stock. 

 

 


Edited by jsager01, 06 November 2013 - 02:43 PM.

It's dangerous to eat, it's more dangerous to live.


#294 jsager01

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 03:18 PM

 

 

What kind of ingredients do you have trouble getting?
 
The only thing we really have trouble with is calamansi. We can get most other stuff, though in varying qualities.


Ah, calamansi. The one thing I never have trouble getting. Always have at least two or three trees full of fruit. Even when we lived in Alaska. Can't be without that. Want me to send you some?

 

Thank you for the offer! While I'm pretty sure they could be imported to Canada (no citrus industry here, so not much worry about bugs and stuff that might destroy our non-existent citrus industry), it's so hot right now I'm not sure they'd survive the trip!

 

I wonder if I can get a plant here. Our winters are so harsh, though, and I'm not sure it will be warm enough, even indoors.

 

 

i dont think you need to import, i am quite sure they are available from nurseries in Canada, or quite often in chinese grocery stores around chinese new year, the thing about auspicious golden fruits,etc...at a price.

 

If you keep them indoors, it does not really matter what the temperature outside is... they will survive at whatever temp you keep yourself alive :-)).


It's dangerous to eat, it's more dangerous to live.


#295 Jaymes

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 09:20 AM

Jaymes unexpectedly sent me a present of another box of calamansi. I don't think either of the dishes I'm about to show here are orthodox Filipino cuisine, but she asked that I post them in the Filipino thread, so here they are. I will say her calamansi are fantastic, even better this time, and I do like to devour them fresh, rind and all.

 

Here are the calamansi as they arrived:

 

calamansi_zps4b2806e2.jpg

 

Spinach with calamansi dressing and dried shrimp:

 

spinach_calamansi_zpsc54f380a.jpg

 

Chicken adobo. I used calamansi juice in place of most of the vinegar usually specified. Marinated overnight. So much fuller and fruitier than adobos I've made in the past using pure vinegar.

 

adobo_zpsf5d8bacd.jpg

 

Wow, Patrick.  Your adobo looks really wonderful.  I don't know how you could get more "orthodox Filipino cuisine" than adobo with some calamansi juice added.

 

And thanks for posting in the Filipino thread.  I do think "Filipino food is Fantastic," and it doesn't get much love here.

 

Glad you enjoyed the calamansi care packages.  My trees are so prolific and, although I do give many away to local friends and family, it's been fun sending some off to the deepest, darkest wilds of NYC.


Edited by Jaymes, 07 November 2013 - 09:24 AM.

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#296 patrickamory

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 09:44 PM

Thank YOU Jaymes! 



#297 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 11:00 AM

Lets all send positive thoughts to the Filippinos that their loved ones are safe and loss of life is minimal.
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#298 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 11:01 AM

Hong Kong supermarket has Calimansi juice in the frozen section
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#299 huiray

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 11:12 AM

"Hong Kong supermarket" - I assume that is the local place for you?  I imagine others will have other sorts of "Asian"/Chinese/East Asian/SE Asian markets accessible to them.  I myself have a bag of commercial frozen calamansi juice also, in my freezer, for occasions when I wish to use it.



#300 Jaymes

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 12:18 PM

Lets all send positive thoughts to the Filippinos that their loved ones are safe and loss of life is minimal.

 

So true.  Watched the coverage with tears in my eyes. 


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