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"Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day" Zoe Francois (2008–2009)

Bread Cookbook

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#541 melissafitz

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 06:08 AM

i know i'm late to this party, but i am LOVING this book! my first boule recipe turned out a bit too wet -- it didn't hold the slashes -- but it still was delicious!
i made the brioche this weekend and just put together some sticky buns. i'm thinking they're going to turn out great. the dough was super easy to handle this time -- nice and supple and firm.

thanks to zoe and jeff!!!

#542 Jmahl

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Posted 07 October 2009 - 07:01 PM

Made my weekly bread batch adopting Heartsurgeons formula but upped the whole wheat to 20% and baked a little longer for a really hard crunch in crust. We are very happy with the results.

Here is the formula. 800 gms KA white flour, 200 gms whole wheat flour, 750 gms water heated to 100 degrees f., 20 gms salt, 12 gms granulated yeast, 2 Tbs. honey and 2 Tbs. caraway seeds.

Enjoy.
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#543 Heartsurgeon

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 08:54 AM

the wife wanted foccacia bread, so here's the recipe i used:

1000 gms KA all purpose flour
12 gms yeast
20 gms salt
20 gms malt powder
20 gms semolina flour
700 gms water
50 grams rosemary/garlic infused olive oil
1 tbsp of minced fresh rosemary

(rosemary/garlic infused olive oil made by adding strippings off 10 sprigs of rosemary, and 6 peeled cloves of garlic to 1/2 cup of olive oil and pulsing into a mash using an immersion (stick) blender. the result was strained through sieve, yielding the olive oil and minced rosemary, which was also added to the dough. the remaining olive oil and rosemary was recombined, and later drizzled over the foccacia just prior to baking.

The dough was allowed to rise for about 3-4 hours.
lightly dusted with flour, cut in half, laid out on a oiled siplat/baking tray (using some of the left over rosemary oil)
the dough was pressed out with my fingers until it was about 1/2 inch in thickness, and allowed to rest for about 40 minutes.
dimples in the foccacia where made with my fingers, and rosemary/garlic/olive oil was drizzled over the foccacia. a very light sprinkle of Kosher salt over the focaccia, then into a pre-heated oven at 400 for about 30 minutes. The obligatory 1 cup of water into the broiler pan added when the bread went in the oven.

FANTASTIC result.
way easier than making boules, as i only make one big loaf, and since it's all done on the silpat, minimal cleanup, no transfer issues. no need to wait for the flavor to mature, as the rosemary provides plenty of flavor.

#544 Jmahl

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 04:58 PM

the wife wanted foccacia bread, so here's the recipe i used:

1000 gms KA all purpose flour
12 gms yeast
20 gms salt
20 gms malt powder
20 gms semolina flour
700 gms water
50 grams rosemary/garlic infused olive oil
1 tbsp of minced fresh rosemary

(rosemary/garlic infused olive oil made by adding strippings off 10 sprigs of rosemary, and 6 peeled cloves of garlic to 1/2 cup of olive oil and pulsing into a mash using an immersion (stick) blender. the result was strained through sieve, yielding the olive oil and minced rosemary, which was also added to the dough. the remaining olive oil and rosemary was recombined, and later drizzled over the foccacia just prior to baking.

The dough was allowed to rise for about 3-4 hours.
lightly dusted with flour, cut in half, laid out on a oiled siplat/baking tray (using some of the left over rosemary oil)
the dough was pressed out with my fingers until it was about 1/2 inch in thickness, and allowed to rest for about 40 minutes.
dimples in the foccacia where made with my fingers, and rosemary/garlic/olive oil was drizzled over the foccacia. a very light sprinkle of Kosher salt over the focaccia, then into a pre-heated oven at 400 for about 30 minutes. The obligatory 1 cup of water into the broiler pan added when the bread went in the oven.

FANTASTIC result.
way easier than making boules, as i only make one big loaf, and since it's all done on the silpat, minimal cleanup, no transfer issues. no need to wait for the flavor to mature, as the rosemary provides plenty of flavor.



Sounds great - we will give your recipe a try. P.S. after seeing some of your work I have no doubts.

Jmahl
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#545 CKatCook

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 04:57 AM

When I read the book it said that the "master recipe" which can be left in the refrigerator for two weeks and still be good. I left mine in for about a week and half after I made the first loaf and it was kind of grey and icky...

What did I do wrong? Did anyone else experience this? I didn't stir it any during that time, I put it in a plastic container that I poked holes in the top of the container.
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#546 baroness

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 07:19 AM

Perhaps the holes let in something undesirable? I lay the lid on top of my container but don't press it down to seal.

#547 Jmahl

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 04:46 PM

We seal our container and a batch has lasted for several weeks.
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#548 lesliec

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 07:07 PM

Same. I use a Tupperware-type container and my dough very happily lasts two weeks (unless I make bread from it, in which case it lasts no time at all ...).

I would even recommend leaving some dough behind (a cup or so - whatever's left) from Batch A when making Batch B, and so on (this is an extension of the book's suggestion not to wash the container). Over the next few weeks I get a lovely sourdough effect - smells wonderful. Dough from the Deli Rye variant smells kind of like beer if treated the same way.

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#549 CKatCook

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 11:00 AM

Well, I punched the holes in the top because I thought the gases from the yeast had to have some place to "escape" to.

I will try it with a ocmpletely sealed bowl and see what happens.

Thanks!
"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"
-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

#550 lesliec

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 04:08 PM

Tried the brioche recipe this weekend.

Put the water, yeast, salt, butter and honey in a container as specified, the mixed in the flour. THEN noticed the beaten eggs sitting waiting to be put in BEFORE the flour ...

I managed to recover, but I got a really wet dough which absolutely refused to be shaped in any way, even after a rest in the fridge. I cooked it anyway (much longer than the recipe said) and it tasted more or less OK, but I'm sure it should be better. It gets one more try, this time with the ingredients added in the right order.

But I do so love the results of the master recipe. <Sigh> - it's lunchtime.

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#551 sygyzy

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 05:51 PM

I haven't followed this topic in a while but does anyone have the Master Recipe with weight measurements (tested, please)? I would greatly appreciate it.

P.S. I realize that different flours have different gluten so let's just say King Arthur AP.

#552 Marmish

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 06:10 PM

I haven't followed this topic in a while but does anyone have the Master Recipe with weight measurements (tested, please)? I would greatly appreciate it.

P.S. I realize that different flours have different gluten so let's just say King Arthur AP.



It's back there somewhere. Around page 10 maybe? A quick look did not turn up my post-it where I had it written down.

#553 Heartsurgeon

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 01:47 PM

basic recipe

750 gms water
12 gms salt
20 gms yeast
1000gms flour

for additional flavor, i add
20 gms malt powder
20 gms semolina flour
2-4 hour room temp rise
into the fridge, use for up to 2 weeks.

i allow 2 hour rise time when using refrigerated dough
bake at 450 degrees
add 1 cup of water to a broiler pan in the bottom of the pre-heated oven just when you place the bread in the oven

see my pictoral tutorial on page 17? or therabouts.

#554 lesliec

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 06:49 PM

Not specifically on this topic, but since these are the recipes I'm using right now I'll ask it here ...

The instructions (in this book and elsewhere) always say something along the lines of 'put a dish in the bottom of the oven. Just before you put the bread dough in, pour a cupful of hot water into the dish.'

Why? Why not put water (any temperature, even cold) into the dish before you put it in the oven? As the oven heats so does the water, and is nicely steaming by the time the oven is ready for the bread.

Being inherently lazy, that's how I do mine and it seems to work perfectly well. I think I may have tried the 'approved' method once and couldn't see any difference. Is there any particular reason all the recipes specify the 'hot water just before dough' technique?

For clarification: I'm not asking the reason we add the water/steam, just the timing of adding the water.

I welcome theories from other eGulleters.

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#555 heidih

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 08:02 PM

Good question. I always add it right away. In any case it has to come up to temp. It is not like it is going to all steam away before you get the dough in.?

#556 Jmahl

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 04:23 PM

Good question. I always add it right away. In any case it has to come up to temp. It is not like it is going to all steam away before you get the dough in.?



First -- Heartsurgeon's weight based recipe has worked for me for over a year. My only change is I add about 2 Tbs. of honey to the 100 degree water and then I mix in the yeast. I alo heat the oven to 550 and drop it to 450 when the loaves go in.

On the hot water issue. I keep an aluminum pan on the bottom shelf of the oven. When I put the loaves into the stove I add one cup of tap water. It hits the hot pan and steams. I think I get great crust.

Hope this helps.
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#557 Dian

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 07:34 PM

Not specifically on this topic, but since these are the recipes I'm using right now I'll ask it here ...

The instructions (in this book and elsewhere) always say something along the lines of 'put a dish in the bottom of the oven. Just before you put the bread dough in, pour a cupful of hot water into the dish.'

Why? Why not put water (any temperature, even cold) into the dish before you put it in the oven? As the oven heats so does the water, and is nicely steaming by the time the oven is ready for the bread.

Being inherently lazy, that's how I do mine and it seems to work perfectly well. I think I may have tried the 'approved' method once and couldn't see any difference. Is there any particular reason all the recipes specify the 'hot water just before dough' technique?

For clarification: I'm not asking the reason we add the water/steam, just the timing of adding the water.

I welcome theories from other eGulleters.


If I were to guess the reason for the timing, it would be to ensure an instant burst of steam that comes into contact with a larger surface area of the loaf in a shorter span of time, thus promoting a more efficient gelatinization of the crust?

Also, if you place the water in during the preheat, won't it also take longer for the water in the pan (during the preheat) to come up to temperature?

I'm also curious to know whether the drop in oven temperature when one opens the door is greater where steam rushes out instead of just hot air.

It's all moot for my purposes anyway :raz: . I spray the loaf and invert a pot over the loaf and let it bake for 15 minutes before removing it.

#558 Heartsurgeon

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 07:22 AM

I learned how important "minor" details are in the final outcome of your bread.
I baked bread at my Dad's house (different oven than mine).
I baked the bread on a silpat (not the usual pizza stone).

My Dad's oven is non-convection, and i had 2 trays of bread separated vertically by 3-4 inches, in the middle of his oven.

The upper tray cooked significantly faster.
The tops of the buns cooked (browned) significantly faster than the bases of the buns.
The buns came out with a thinner crust overall, and the entire bun was less crunchy and softer.

Exact same recipe, exact same technique (other than differences noted above),
ENTIRELY DIFFERENT bun came out texturally. I was amazed how different the final product was.

I guess i learned that you can't assume that any one recipe/technique will work the identically in a different kitchen.

For those who are having a hard time getting fabulous bread, keep experimenting and figure out what works best with your setup.

Making great bread can be remarkably gratifying, is generally appreciated by all, and can be a profound pleasure to eat.

#559 Jmahl

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 07:48 PM

This is a sample of our whole wheat bread (47%) made with fresh ground whole wheat flour. The taste is nutty, wheaty and very flavorful. Great crust. What do you think?
Bread Whole Wheat 001.JPG
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#560 Heartsurgeon

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 08:13 PM

looks good. what is the exact formula?

#561 Jmahl

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Posted 19 December 2009 - 01:11 PM

This is a 20% whole wheat loaf we baked today. I use Heartsurgeon's formula except I add about a tablespoon or two of honey and heat the oven to 550 and drop to 450 when the bread goes in onto the baking stone. This was almost half of the batch so the oven time was about 50 minutes.


Bread 001.JPG

 

 

 

[Moderator note: This topic continues in Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day" Zoe Francois (2010–)]


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