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Fresh Pork jowl/cheek


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9 replies to this topic

#1 saucée

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 07:42 AM

I have two fresh pork jowls in my freezer. I've been looking for information on them but haven't been able to find any. I love smoked jowls for their good mix of meatiness and fat but I'm not sure what to do with fresh ones and no one seems to use them (or at least no one wants to talk about it).

What I do for fresh jowls? I am going to braise them for sure but they are covered with an amazing amount of fat. Should I cut off as much fat as possible and braise them the night before in order to fully degrease the sauce?

Does anybody have any thoughts for braising pork jowl? Are there any other preparations that I don't know about?


josh
josh

#2 Fugu

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 08:03 AM

Here is something different. A Filipino specialty from Pampanga called sizzling sisig, a highly seasoned minced pork meat and skin, mostly from the head, mixed with some chopped liver. It is served on a sizzling platter with plain rice and some beer. I don't have a recipe but it is an easy google away.

#3 Henry dV

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 02:09 PM

What I do for fresh jowls? I am going to braise them for sure but they are covered with an amazing amount of fat. Should I cut off as much fat as possible and braise them the night before in order to fully degrease the sauce?

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Ab-so-lutely on the money......... a most under-rated cut IMHO.

Braise, casserole, daube, pot au feu........generally anything slow and anything that can be re-heated and therefore gelatinously heaven.
"It's true I crept the boards in my youth, but I never had it in my blood, and that's what so essential isn't it? The theatrical zeal in the veins. Alas, I have little more than vintage wine and memories." - Montague Withnail.

#4 nhamilto

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 04:17 PM

Think of them as tougher, more flavorfull pork belly. They have a similar amount of fat but the muscle has actually done some work.

#5 tamiam

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 04:23 PM

Guanciale :rolleyes:
Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther

#6 sara

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 08:49 AM

Here's a link to a recipe my pork purveyor here in Madison (Willow Creek) recommended. I've made it once, and it was delicious.

http://www.whatgeeks...ks-and-polenta/
Food is a convenient way for ordinary people to experience extraordinary pleasure, to live it up a bit.
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#7 MikeM

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 10:37 AM

I agree that a slow braise is the way to go. However, I grew up with my grandmother making pig cheeks on a regular basis. She actually cut the cheeks into cutlets and then seasoned them with salt and pepper, floured the cutlets and then pan fried them. Once finished she made a pan gravy from the rendered fat - believe me there was plenty of pork fatty goodness. She called them "pork cutlets" and I had no clue they were actually pig cheeks until I was a teenager. The cheeks were "chewey" but in my opinion it didn't matter b/c the flavor was outstanding.

#8 saucée

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 10:48 AM

Here's a link to a recipe my pork purveyor here in Madison (Willow Creek) recommended. I've made it once, and it was delicious.

http://www.whatgeeks...ks-and-polenta/

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Thanks, I hadn't seen this before. Coincidentally, I live in Madison and get my pork from Willow Creek. That's a cool blog; I can't believe I hadn't found it before.

It looks like the consensus, for the most part, is braising so I think I'm going to braise them with wine and chestnuts, maybe with some gnocchi as an accompaniment, for a good, rich cold weather bowl of deliciousness.


josh
josh

#9 sara

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 07:28 PM

That is indeed a coincidence-- wow! Willow Creek has wonderful pork, I'm especially a fan of their L'Etoile chops.

This thread has inspired me to make guanciale with the jowls I have in my freezer at the moment. We'll see what happens...


Here's a link to a recipe my pork purveyor here in Madison (Willow Creek) recommended. I've made it once, and it was delicious.

http://www.whatgeeks...ks-and-polenta/

View Post


Thanks, I hadn't seen this before. Coincidentally, I live in Madison and get my pork from Willow Creek. That's a cool blog; I can't believe I hadn't found it before.

It looks like the consensus, for the most part, is braising so I think I'm going to braise them with wine and chestnuts, maybe with some gnocchi as an accompaniment, for a good, rich cold weather bowl of deliciousness.


josh

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Food is a convenient way for ordinary people to experience extraordinary pleasure, to live it up a bit.
-- William Grimes

#10 saucée

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 08:52 PM

I love the l'Etoile chops too and Willow Creek has amazing products; I'm lucky to be able to buy from them and other Madison purveyors. What Madison lacks in restaurants, it makes up in raw product.

So I braised the jowls and they were quite good:

Posted Image

I braised them with some wine, chicken stock, mirepoix, cinnamon clove juniper bay, and added some chestnuts. It was over the top: gelatinous, unctuous (I know this word has been called out as pretentious in another thread, but this is all I can think of), and rich.

I've never worked with this cut before and I know it's been relegated to the variety meats category but it's well worth it. Treat yourself to some pork jowl.

josh
josh