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Foodblog: Lucylou95816

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#91 heidih

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 06:19 PM

Totally enjoying your blog. Wonderful photos. Adorable beasts. I have a male yellow lab who looks alot like yours- he is such a foodie- roasted asparagus, cantaloupe, quality apples, carrots, and currently in love with Asian pears- but they have to be peeled and please do not include any core.

The cardoni- cardoon- looks like an artichoke but the flowers are very small and not edible, the stems are harvested and have a mild artichoke flavor when properly cooked. They are usually blanched in the growing process like celery - tied to keep them white & to make them more tender. They are very bitter. I have cut them raw from the garden and accidentally gotten juice on my finger, then eaten something. The bitter rests on your palate a long time. Most recipes pre-cook them to get rid of some of the bitter. Chardgirl has a potato- cardoon gratin in RecipeGullet that is a standard prep. The ones you have look kinda tired and I think they are better harvested in cooler weather. I would ask the gentleman who sold them how they are preparing the type you purchased. Thank you again and looking forward to more.

#92 lucylou95816

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 09:10 PM

Totally enjoying your blog. Wonderful photos. Adorable beasts. I have a male yellow lab who looks alot like yours- he is such a foodie- roasted asparagus, cantaloupe, quality apples, carrots, and currently in love with Asian pears- but they have to be peeled and please do not include any core.

The cardoni- cardoon- looks like an artichoke but the flowers are very small and not edible, the stems are harvested and have a mild artichoke flavor when properly cooked. They are usually blanched in the growing process like celery - tied to keep them white & to make them more tender. They are very bitter. I have cut them raw from the garden and accidentally gotten juice on my finger, then eaten something. The bitter rests on your palate a long time. Most recipes pre-cook them to get rid of some of the bitter. Chardgirl has a potato- cardoon gratin in RecipeGullet that is a standard prep. The ones you have look kinda tired and I think they are better harvested in cooler weather. I would ask the gentleman who sold them how they are preparing the type you purchased. Thank you again and looking forward to more.

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Thank you for the message. Labs are great dogs, aren't they? Mine isn't the smartest lab in the world, but she is pretty (IMO) My exboyfriend had a black lab named Willie and he and Riley were the best of friends. Willie lived with me for a while, and he taught Riley how to jump up and pick peaches off the tree in the backyard. They'd both sit in the back yard munching on peaches. The pits were really small, and Willie swallowed them, you'd see them out the other end. Riley wouldn't eat the pits. Since that relationship ended, Riley hasn't wanted a peach ever again. I would buy him some and give it to him, but he couldn't be bothered. I guess the memory of his old friend was to sad for him to continue eating peaches.

I did take the cardoon down with me last night to the bar, since I knew that Hugo, my Italian friend would be there to show me how to peel it. In his opinion, that one he said was very tender, and he almost wanted to take it home. He's going to go to Corti Brothers today and buy what they had left. I did taste it (a teeny piece) raw last night, and it almost tasted like celery. Like you said, you want them white, he said. We'll give it a try tonight and see how we like it. Mark is not a fan of artichokes, so we'll see if he likes it.

edited to add the cardoon information

Edited by lucylou95816, 26 November 2007 - 07:25 AM.


#93 prasantrin

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 09:34 PM

I love those cat pictures! I love cats that love each other, even though it looks like Peabody is suckling Pickles...which is a wee bit weird... It makes me miss my cat even more! But I wish she were as affectionate as your furballs.

Your TG dinner looked amazing. I didn't get a TG dinner this year--either a Canadian or an American one. It's good to see that one can eat well, even on Atkins. :smile:

#94 lucylou95816

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 09:48 PM

well, I have tonight's dinner, we just need more time to post. it's been a total pleasure....with great food and great winel

#95 MarketStEl

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Posted 25 November 2007 - 10:21 PM

Lucy, this has been a fabulous blog. Lots of lovely pictures, some great tips on wines I'll never find in Pennsylvania, I suspect, and adorable pet photos. Glad to hear that Atkins, loosely interpreted, is working for you.

Thanks a bunch for sharing your week with us!
Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
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#96 Domestic Goddess

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 05:51 AM

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Lucy - that vegetable is the chayote or sayote as we call it in the Philippines. We usually use it in stir-frys and sometimes as a substitute for green papaya in a chicken soup dish called tinola.

The fruit is roughly pear shaped, somewhat flattened and with coarse wrinkles, ranging from 10 to 20 cm in length. It has a thin green skin fused with the white flesh, and a single large flattened pip. The flesh has a fairly bland taste, and a texture described as a cross between a potato and a cucumber. Although generally discarded, the seed has a nutty flavour and may be eaten as part of the fruit. (Wiki)
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#97 Marigene

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:21 AM

Lucy, thanks for taking the time to dazzle us with the amazing blog during such a busy time of year; it was most enjoyable. I loved all the photos of your adorable pets, wine, Thanksgiving meal, amazing farmers market and grocery. I wish there was something even close to that in my area. Thank you, again for sharing! :wub:

#98 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:28 AM

I love those cat pictures!  I love cats that love each other, even though it looks like Peabody is suckling Pickles...which is a wee bit weird...  It makes me miss my cat even more!  But I wish she were as affectionate as your furballs.

Your TG dinner looked amazing.  I didn't get a TG dinner this year--either a Canadian or an American one.  It's good to see that one can eat well, even on Atkins. :smile:

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I think that Peabody likes to warm his head in Mr. Pickles big belly. :raz: These two defintely love each other. They chase each other around and play rough, but then they snuggle with each other.

Thanks for the message, yes, as far as Atkins, we're back on the horse, so to speak, eating the right way. I think I said that after this week, all the wine, that I am not weighing myself until Friday. It will be nice to see a little loss then.

#99 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:29 AM

Lucy, this has been a fabulous blog.  Lots of lovely pictures, some great tips on wines I'll never find in Pennsylvania, I suspect, and adorable pet photos.  Glad to hear that Atkins, loosely interpreted, is working for you.

Thanks a bunch for sharing your week with us!

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Thanks Sandy, I appreciate the message. Unless you are one of those states that they don't allow wine to be shipped to, I am sure any of those places would be happy to ship to you. :biggrin:

#100 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:30 AM

Posted Image

Lucy - that vegetable is the chayote or sayote as we call it in the Philippines. We usually use it in stir-frys and sometimes as a substitute for green papaya in a chicken soup dish called tinola.

The fruit is roughly pear shaped, somewhat flattened and with coarse wrinkles, ranging from 10 to 20 cm in length. It has a thin green skin fused with the white flesh, and a single large flattened pip. The flesh has a fairly bland taste, and a texture described as a cross between a potato and a cucumber. Although generally discarded, the seed has a nutty flavour and may be eaten as part of the fruit.  (Wiki)

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Thanks! I appreciate the information. I was suspecting that is what they might be, but I couldn't tell for sure. I wonder if it has alot of carbs?

#101 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:31 AM

Lucy, thanks for taking the time to dazzle us with the amazing blog during such a busy time of year; it was most enjoyable. I loved all the photos of your adorable pets, wine, Thanksgiving meal, amazing farmers market and grocery. I wish there was something even close to that in my area. Thank you, again for sharing! :wub:

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Marigene, Thank you for the message. It has been a lot of work, but fun as well. Mark was very enthusiastic about this blog. He said, "I didn't think that our life was that interesting until I saw it on the internet." :raz:

#102 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:33 AM

I am uploading the pictures of the our "last supper" so to speak but did get the creamed onions recipe from my dad's girlfriend. Here it is:

I use the small onions that come in a bag. I have learned over the years that it is easier to peel them after they are cooked. I boil them till tender then peel them.

Cream sauce: 2 tab. of butter 2 tab. of flour 1/4 teas. salt
1/8 teas. pepper 1 cup of milk.

Melt the butter in sauce pan. Add flour stirring while adding. When completely added start to add the milk but do it slowly and continue to stir. Bring to a boil and cook until you have it at the desired thickness. I sometimes add more milk. I doubled this at Thanksgiving and used 4 bags of onions. I also did this much ahead of time and then put in the oven to warm before dinner. I took it out when they were bubbling. I sprinkled with a light coating of Paprika.

#103 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:53 AM

Okey doke, here's the last dinner for you. Since we went down to have a couple of cocktails, it's amazing that we go this dinner done, and semi-okay pictures to boot. But we had obligations to you! :raz:

As I had said, we used Tyler's Ultimate Meatballs, no spaghetti. These are so good. The low carb twist though is to use

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Now this wouldn't have been a proper low carb foodblog without the appearance of pork rinds. I personally don't like the taste of them, but what we do is soak them in heavy cream

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And they take the place of bread crumbs.

We didn't get pictures of the next steps, were sauteed onions and garlic, put into a bowl with the pork rinds, salt, pepper, chopped parsley, hamburger meat and ground pork.

Roll them into almost tennis ball sized balls. This recipe makes about 10 good sized meatballs

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Brown them in a skillet with some oil

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Then put them into a baking dish

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In another pot, saute some onion

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add some garlic

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Then add the San Marzano tomatoes

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Add some basil, season with salt and pepper and let simmer for a bit. We might have thrown some wine in there too.

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Pour the sauce over the meatballs

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Grate some mozzarella cheese
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Spread on top of the meatballs and sauce

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And bake until melted and bubbly

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Then it's time to dish some up

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That's what I'll be having for breakfast, since the original plan was to also make last night, a crustless quiche for my breakfast this week since it's back to good old work. But that didn't happen. I'll probably make it tonight and what will go into that is eggs, cream, I got some Italian sausage, I was going to use the sweet red onions I got yesterday at the farmers market, some frozen broccoli and some frozen artichoke hearts. Mix it all together, bake it and it's done. I just reheat in the morning in the microwave and sometimes add a dollop of sour cream.

#104 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 08:00 AM

One last cleanup note, I talked to my friend about the yankee doodles. Basically she toasts the rye bread on both sides. Makes a meat mix of hamburger, some ketchup, lea and perrins, salt, pepper, one other thing I can't remember. :huh: Spreads it on the bread, smears some of that durkee sauce on top and then broils them until they are done. No cheese or anything else.

Well, that's about all I have for you. Myself and Mark, along with the furry crew, have truly enjoyed spending this week sharing our food related habits with everyone. Please feel free to ask any questions, I'll answer them as long as the blog stays open.

Thanks again to everyone who has read and commented.

Have a great Holiday Season!

:wub:

#105 Smithy

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:47 AM

I've thoroughly enjoyed the photos - of wonderful pets, fine foods, excellent cooking - as well as the writeups. I am agog at Corti's, and envious of the Farmer's Market. It reminds me anew, as if I needed reminding, just how short the growing season is out here compared to there. (It IS too bad the Meyer Lemon seller picked so many lemons still green.) Thanks for giving us such a good pictorial glimpse into the Atkins lifestyle.

Thanks for doing such a lovely blog!

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#106 racheld

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:53 AM

I know how much work this was, with a holiday to cover, and you did it splendidly!!

Thank you for all the lovely photos and visits to places we may never see save through another's eyes. It's been wonderful.
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#107 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:54 AM

I've thoroughly enjoyed the photos - of wonderful pets, fine foods, excellent cooking - as well as the writeups.  I am agog at Corti's, and envious of the Farmer's Market.  It reminds me anew, as if I needed reminding, just how short the growing season is out here compared to there.  (It IS too bad the Meyer Lemon seller picked so many lemons still green.)  Thanks for giving us such a good pictorial glimpse into the Atkins lifestyle. 

Thanks for doing such a lovely blog!

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Thank you for reading and your comments. I was actually surprised to see lemons there, since in the past when I have asked about lemons, they say that since alot of them are grown in Mexico, they don't allow the sellers at California Farmers Markets. At this house, I do have a lemon tree that gives us a good bunch of them. One of the ladies that works at one of the doctor offices I call on, asked if she could have some, and I told her to help herself. Some days when I go into the office, she'll have a lemon or two standing by. Right now they're still pretty green, but the orange tree that is between my house and my neighbors is starting to look like it will be orange juice time soon. Thanks again!

#108 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 09:55 AM

I know how much work this was, with a holiday to cover, and you did it splendidly!!

Thank you for all the lovely photos and visits to places we may never see save through another's eyes.  It's been wonderful.

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Thank you! I am glad that you enjoyed it. What will I do with my time now?--This week, plan a party for 40+ on Saturday. :blink:

#109 Priscilla

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 10:22 AM

Really enjoyable blog, Stephanie. I am glad to have had the peek inside Corti Bros., have heard about it for so long and it does look fabulous.

The pix of your Sunday farmer's market could almost have been of the Sunday farmer's market I attended here in SoCal yesterday, veg-wise anyways. Sure wish ours had oysters, though.

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#110 MarketStEl

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 10:32 AM

Plan a party for 40+ people? That will be a piece of cake compared to keeping a foodblog, trust me. (This might not be the case if it weren't for the requirement that all images be uploaded to ImageGullet.)

As for the wine: If you go back through my second foodblog (link in .sig), you will note that I devoted a fair bit of time to Pennsylvania's liquor laws and state monopoly on liquor sales. The only alcoholic beverage producers who are exempt from working through the State Store system are the state's own wineries, some of which are coming into their own as producers of interesting, quality wine; they may sell directly to consumers at the winery or through their own retail outlets (Blue Mountain Vineyards has one of these in the Reading Terminal Market). Otherwise, if the LCB doesn't carry it in their Wine & Spirits shops, your only options are: 1) Use the LCB's special order system to have it shipped to a State Store near you or 2) head to an out-of-state retail outlet to purchase it illegally.

Pennsylvania wineries were allowed to ship product directly to Pennsylvania consumers, but a court decision ruled that this practice discriminated against out-of-state wineries and thus ran afoul of the U.S. Constitution's interstate commerce clause. As a result, Pennsylvanians can't have wine legally shipped directly to them from anywhere, be it Chadds Ford or Chatsworth.

I guess I'll have to travel to California to check these out.

Thanks again for a great blog!
Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
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#111 DCP

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 11:26 AM

Stephanie, many thanks (do I detect an echo in here?) for the blog. I'm particularly appreciative of the numerous photos, and will admit to salivating occasionally at your well-documented efforts. As a former resident of California for nearly two decades, your home town is quite familiar to me - and yet, I saw little familiar in your view. Thank you for the new sights, new recipes, and nostalgia.
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#112 Chufi

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 11:49 AM

Thank you for a great blog. Lovely pet pictures, and wonderful food! And a special thanks for sharing your Thanksgiving with us. I know a blog is hard work and it's even harder when you have to report about festivities! (especially with all that wine :wink: )

#113 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:01 PM

Really enjoyable blog, Stephanie.  I am glad to have had the peek inside Corti Bros., have heard about it for so long and it does look fabulous.

The pix of your Sunday farmer's market could almost have been of the Sunday farmer's market I attended here in SoCal yesterday, veg-wise anyways.  Sure wish ours had oysters, though.

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That's interesting that you've heard of Corti Brothers. I've never really had the oysters, so I don't know if this guy was selling good ones or not. Thanks for reading.


Plan a party for 40+ people?  That will be a piece of cake compared to keeping a foodblog, trust me.  (This might not be the case if it weren't for the requirement that all images be uploaded to ImageGullet.)

As for the wine:  If you go back through my second foodblog (link in .sig), you will note that I devoted a fair bit of time to Pennsylvania's liquor laws and state monopoly on liquor sales.  The only alcoholic beverage producers who are exempt from working through the State Store system are the state's own wineries, some of which are coming into their own as producers of interesting, quality wine; they may sell directly to consumers at the winery or through their own retail outlets (Blue Mountain Vineyards has one of these in the Reading Terminal Market).  Otherwise, if the LCB doesn't carry it in their Wine & Spirits shops, your only options are: 1) Use the LCB's special order system to have it shipped to a State Store near you or 2) head to an out-of-state retail outlet to purchase it illegally.

Pennsylvania wineries were allowed to ship product directly to Pennsylvania consumers, but a court decision ruled that this practice discriminated against out-of-state wineries and thus ran afoul of the U.S. Constitution's interstate commerce clause.  As a result, Pennsylvanians can't have wine legally shipped directly to them from anywhere, be it Chadds Ford or Chatsworth.

I guess I'll have to travel to California to check these out.

Thanks again for a great blog!

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Thanks again for taking the time to read and comment. I've read your blogs before, but I'll have to go through again. That really stinks that you can't have them shipped, and then I would assume that if you come here and buy some to take home, you may not be able to get them on the plane, right?

Yes, the party may be easier than imagegullet, that had to be my one big challenge of the blog. Thanks again!


Stephanie, many thanks (do I detect an echo in here?) for the blog.  I'm particularly appreciative of the numerous photos, and will admit to salivating occasionally at your well-documented efforts.  As a former resident of California for nearly two decades, your home town is quite familiar to me - and yet, I saw little familiar in your view.  Thank you for the new sights, new recipes, and nostalgia.

View Post


Thank you for reading, and I am glad to have shared some new experiences with you.


Thank you for a great blog. Lovely pet pictures, and wonderful food! And a special thanks for sharing your Thanksgiving with us. I know a blog is hard work and it's even harder when you have to report about festivities!  (especially with all that wine  :wink: )

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The wine numbed the pain. :raz: Thank you for reading and taking the time to comment.

#114 CaliPoutine

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:49 PM

Thanks for taking the time to blog, especially during Thanksgiving. Having done 3 blogs, I know its a lot of work!!

#115 lucylou95816

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 07:51 PM

Thanks for taking the time to blog, especially during Thanksgiving.  Having done 3 blogs, I know its a lot of work!!

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Your Welcome and thank you for reading and contributing with Harley. We had a great time. Thanks.

#116 faine

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Posted 26 November 2007 - 08:06 PM

Excellent blog! (Especially the potato recipe. Holy moly. And the pork rinds.)

Just wanted to drop by and say hey...you know my mom (Nancy) from Junior League. :) She mentioned you had a blog on Egullet and I'm glad I took a look. It's so nice to see Sacramento bloggers covering my home region...I am dying to try 55 Degrees because mussels are such wonderful, wonderful things. The farmers markets photos are dizzying...we go to a teeny little market near our house in Carmichael, but it obviously doesn't compare. I'm jealous.

Anyways, hope to see you around while posting on EG!





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