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NON Soy TVP


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#1 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 04:43 PM

Are there any NON Soy TVP meat substitutes?
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#2 kbjesq

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 05:25 PM

Are there any NON Soy TVP meat substitutes?

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Seitan comes to mind . . . I'm sure that there are others.

#3 david coonce

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 06:55 PM

beans? vegetables?

Besides that, Seitan seems like your only bet.

Seitan is pretty nasty stuff, but it can be useful filler with a decent sauce. It's pretty neutral.
"A culture's appetite always springs from its poor" - John Thorne

#4 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 07:21 PM

Do you know of any companies ONLINE with Sites that offer Seitan Crumbles or burgers etc?
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#5 vinelady

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 08:56 AM

You might check veganessentials.com

#6 plk

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 11:34 AM

You could try some of the meat substitutes from Morningstar Farms: http://www.seeveggiesdifferently.com/

#7 rickster

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 12:58 PM

Or you could try Quorn

Quorn

#8 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 01:20 PM

You could try some of the meat substitutes from Morningstar Farms: http://www.seeveggiesdifferently.com/

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All Soy, but thanks
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#9 vinelady

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 01:28 PM

You could try some of the meat substitutes from Morningstar Farms: http://www.seeveggiesdifferently.com/

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All Soy, but thanks

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I know that there is a seitan burger mix on the vegan essentials site.

#10 kbjesq

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 06:08 PM

Seitan is pretty nasty stuff, but it can be useful filler with a decent sauce. It's pretty neutral.

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Whoa, friend. Seitan is definitely not "nasty stuff". You obviously have not had it prepared correctly!

I have witnesses . . . red-meat-and-potato-eating-only witnesses, who will attest that seitan, properly prepared, can be not only delicious but addictive! I don't know where you are from, but I'm in the US, and it troubles me that so many non-meat entrees are given short shrift or worse.

I still get requests, from some die hard carnivores, for the seitan "turkey" dish that I prepared one Thanksgiving. Please keep your mind open . . . you might be very pleasantly surprised. :wink:

#11 david coonce

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 09:26 PM

I am the kitchen manager for a natural foods place, and have used seitan every day of my life for the last nine years. In my opinion, it has a chewy texture but no flavor whatsoever, it is highly perishable (and if you've ever opened a bag of bad seitan you know it's the worst smell in the world - like a used diaper that has fermented), and, well, to put it delicately - seitan is very undigestible (it is pure wheat gluten, after all) and makes many people very gassy.

As a chef in a vegan/vegetarian friendly place, I have learned to accept seitan and all its limitations - the biggest one being that it is texturally always the same - you can't freeze or cook it in any method that creates a different texture than just "chewy." (Even tofu provides myriad textures.) I can live with seitan; I'm just saying that generally, it's going to taste like a fake processed food, because that is what it is. You're never going to wonder "is this beef? Is it chicken." It's a unique profile - no flavor and all texture. It's only as good as the sauce you drown it in.
"A culture's appetite always springs from its poor" - John Thorne

#12 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 10:50 AM

Or you could try Quorn

Quorn

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I am turned off of ever tasting Quorn, due to reading this:
http://en.wikipedia....arium_venenatum
If anyone can dispute or back it up Ill be appreciative
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#13 kbjesq

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 11:24 AM

I am the kitchen manager for a natural foods place, and have used seitan every day of my life for the last nine years. In my opinion, it has a chewy texture but no flavor whatsoever, it is highly perishable (and if you've ever opened a bag of bad seitan you know it's the worst smell in the world - like a used diaper that has fermented), and, well, to put it delicately - seitan is very undigestible (it is pure wheat gluten, after all) and makes many people very gassy.

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I make my own seitan so thankfully, I don't know about the bad smell emanating from the prepackaged stuff. (I'll gladly take your word for it, though). All I know is that fresh homemade seitan can be quite delicious, and thankfully none of my guests experienced excessive flatulence (at least while they were at my house!) :raz:

#14 david coonce

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 09:19 PM

True, homemade seitan is much better. I've done seitan/potato "sausages" for a vegan catering and the seitan was made from scratch, and although it's time-consuming, it is a better product. I don't think most non-vegetarians have the patience to make seitan from scratch. (Or tofu, for that matter, although both are really easy to make)

In my kitchen we go thorugh 20-30# of seitan a week, hence the need for the bagged stuff. I'm not a big fan, although I accept that vegetarians love it and snap it up (especially smothered in a sweet barbecue sauce).
"A culture's appetite always springs from its poor" - John Thorne