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I'm self-appointed, you're self-appointed


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96 replies to this topic

#91 tommy

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 06:18 AM

there is not doubt in my mind that free stuff is a motivating factor some, and not just a bonus.  not for me, however.

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If your contention is that people love free stuff, well then of course I agree with that. But if your contention is that people become food bloggers to get free stuff, there's no doubt in my mind that you're wrong. And I'd be pleased to debate that with you on a topic about that. Not on this topic, which is about something else, though.

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i think my contention is being oversimplified. as far as debating with you or anyone else, that wasn't my goal (and i will decline your offer). i was simply sharing my perspective based on my observations and experiences. i would, however, like to be appointed, if you would be so kind.

#92 annecros

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 02:32 PM

And I don't know of a single food blogger who does it for the free goodies -- that's more of a bonus.

Not bonus; onus.

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What free goodies? WHAT FREE GOODIES? WHERE ARE MY FREE GOODIES?

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Dude, you need to get your name to the local PR types. Hell, even I get invited, on occasion, to free dinners, tastings and the like. These things are full of the local blogger types (and fine people they are, too). Sadly, invites have dropped off of late. Whether I was insufficiently industrious in writing up the gatherings afterwards or PR strategies have changed, I know not. But it was swell while it lasted.

Possible that you're not invited because even in Miami there's only a limited number of restaurants eager to advertise: "as recommended by Daily Cocaine!" :wink:

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:biggrin: You may be right, BB, although I believe they did a survey and it is now the #2 Most Popular Dessert Item after flan! (Was #1 for a long time.)

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hehe, people get tired of Flan pretty quick. :biggrin:

Seriously, did you think that "Daily Cocaine" as the title of your blog would garner interest and traffic, or did you want to stir up controversy? And therefore interest.

I think that a writer really needs a certain number of readers to really validate themselves. I have written many things that others will never read. There are, of course, writers who compulsively insist that others read and approve.

Is there a connection between the offering and the readership? Does it make an individual a better writer that more read, or is the writer good anyway?

#93 Miami Danny

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 09:52 AM

And I don't know of a single food blogger who does it for the free goodies -- that's more of a bonus.

Not bonus; onus.

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What free goodies? WHAT FREE GOODIES? WHERE ARE MY FREE GOODIES?

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Dude, you need to get your name to the local PR types. Hell, even I get invited, on occasion, to free dinners, tastings and the like. These things are full of the local blogger types (and fine people they are, too). Sadly, invites have dropped off of late. Whether I was insufficiently industrious in writing up the gatherings afterwards or PR strategies have changed, I know not. But it was swell while it lasted.

Possible that you're not invited because even in Miami there's only a limited number of restaurants eager to advertise: "as recommended by Daily Cocaine!" :wink:

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:biggrin: You may be right, BB, although I believe they did a survey and it is now the #2 Most Popular Dessert Item after flan! (Was #1 for a long time.)

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hehe, people get tired of Flan pretty quick. :biggrin:

Seriously, did you think that "Daily Cocaine" as the title of your blog would garner interest and traffic, or did you want to stir up controversy? And therefore interest.

I think that a writer really needs a certain number of readers to really validate themselves. I have written many things that others will never read. There are, of course, writers who compulsively insist that others read and approve.

Is there a connection between the offering and the readership? Does it make an individual a better writer that more read, or is the writer good anyway?

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The idea is that food is the new cocaine; especially the way people talk about it in such excited and sometimes even furtive whispers, like it's a guilty (or illegal) pleasure. And, if you're like me, if you got the good stuff, you can never get enough (good food, that is [cough/sniff]). The 'daily' part was just me pushing myself to post every day, which takes discipline and planning, neither of which are my strong suits, especially with no editor and only self-imposed deadlines.

Edited by Miami Danny, 10 November 2007 - 09:55 AM.


#94 Daniel Rogov

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 11:14 AM

Danny, Hi.....


I'm not sure if you don't have it backwards..... that is to say that cocaine may be the newcomer. After all, on the first occasion that Edgar Allen Poe dined on foie gras he observed that "It is even better than the pleasures of the poppy".

And of course there is the well-known Dylan question: "Which came first, the joint or the screaming munchies?"

Yours in all good (and of course, legal) faith

#95 Miami Danny

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 04:08 PM

Danny, Hi.....


I'm not sure if you don't have it backwards..... that is to say that cocaine may be the newcomer.  After all, on the first occasion that Edgar Allen Poe dined on foie gras he observed that "It is even better than the pleasures of the poppy".

And of course there is the well-known Dylan question:  "Which came first, the joint or the screaming munchies?"

Yours in all good (and of course, legal) faith

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In an odd twist, I am now a food columnist for a magazine, a weekly paper, and a major daily (aside from my blog). This has led me to a new blog that critiques the critics Press Chops , as they say, of which I may soon be one. Thank god for multiple personalities. Press Chops is an homage to the Village Voice column Press Clips, where members of the press have their feet put to the fire by other journalists. I try to rise to the occasion.

#96 Blamo

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 06:30 AM

The Introduction in The Man Who Ate Everything written by Jeffrey Steingarten (food writer for Vogue) details a 6 month process of eliminating all of his food phobias and dislikes. He writes, "For I, like everybody I knew suffered from a set of powerful, arbitrary, and debilitating attractions and aversions at mealtime. I feared that I could be no more objective than an art critic who detests the color yellow or suffers from red-green color blindness." After facing and debunking his food issues, he comes to the conclusion that only three non-harmful entities are inedible: hair, paper, and feather. I recently watched the Namibia episode of No Reservations. Tony Bourdain ate the partially cooked rectum (fecal matter still partially within) of a wild boar roasted in ash and a host of other parts, fur intact. The tribe extolled the rectum. They being a gracious host gave it to their guest of honor to eat. Their delicacy was Tony's ridicule. Even Jeffrey Steingarten's extremely liberal criterion for food consumption eliminates their luxury from the realm of enjoyable. We eat fashion that just happens to sustain life. Everyone has equal say in taste. That isn't to say that I don't enjoy the writings of specific food critics. I obviously enjoy Jeffrey Steingarten because he merges humor and food so well, and Raymond Sokolov for his anthropological understanding of food and of course his occasional metaphorical gem. He once referred to the gruyere upon his onion soup as a "ropey toupe" that he could do without.

#97 Miami Danny

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 09:20 AM

The Introduction in The Man Who Ate Everything written by Jeffrey Steingarten (food writer for Vogue) details a 6 month process of eliminating all of his food phobias and dislikes.  He writes, "For I, like everybody I knew suffered from a set of powerful, arbitrary, and debilitating attractions and aversions at mealtime.  I feared that I could be no more objective than an art critic who detests the color yellow or suffers from red-green color blindness."  After facing and debunking his food issues, he comes to the conclusion that only three non-harmful entities are inedible: hair, paper, and feather.  I recently watched the Namibia episode of No Reservations.  Tony Bourdain ate the partially cooked rectum (fecal matter still partially within) of a wild boar roasted in ash and a host of other parts, fur intact.  The tribe extolled the rectum.  They being a gracious host gave it to their guest of honor to eat.  Their delicacy was Tony's ridicule.  Even Jeffrey Steingarten's extremely liberal criterion for food consumption eliminates their luxury from the realm of enjoyable.  We eat fashion that just happens to sustain life.  Everyone has equal say in taste.  That isn't to say that I don't enjoy the writings of specific food critics.  I obviously enjoy Jeffrey Steingarten because he merges humor and food so well, and Raymond Sokolov for his anthropological understanding of food and of course his occasional metaphorical gem.  He once referred to the gruyere upon his onion soup as a "ropey toupe" that he could do without.

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While I'm a big fan of the fecal-filled baked rectum, saying you'll eat anything is like saying you'll shag anything. I don't believe in absolutist statements. Some discernment is always called for. I mean, some things just do not belong in your mouth.
As far as Mr. Bourdain goes, I admire his fortitude, and I'm guessing he probably has nightmares about that anus. However, let's be realistic-His show is centered around his reputation for eating all those 'crazy' things. Let's not be disingenuous. He is not at this feast simply as a guest, but as a famous TV host who eats a lot of gross stuff. And as such, he knows he's getting the anus. To me, watching him eat sh*t is no different than watching the geek at the circus biting the heads off live chickens. A vicarious thrill, perhaps, but in the end, an empty experience.