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Reports on Hong Kong dining


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#1 Sinbad

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Posted 07 November 2004 - 08:02 AM

Looking for a recommendation for a modern/contemporary Chinese restaurant in HK. I'll be staying on the Island and prefer a place there, but I can always hop over to Kowloon if necessary. I prefer something a little bit more modern and I'm not particulary interested in the Shark Fin/Birds Next type of dishes. Price is not a major issue but focus is on food.

Also, a recommendation for a Sichuan restaurant would be most appreciated.

#2 ecr

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Posted 07 November 2004 - 10:55 PM

Sichuan Da Ping Huo for Sichuan food. Never mind the upscale setting, this is delicious, authentic, home-style Sichuan food, and I like the set menu bec you get to try 12 different dishes. There are two seatings a night, and expect your meal to take 2 1/2 hours for the later seating, 2 hours for the earlier. It's on Hollywood Road.

#3 HKDave

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Posted 08 November 2004 - 03:27 AM

Sichuan, very authentic, not expensive by HK standards, reservations essential:
Man Jiang Hong, 1/f 482 Hennessy, Causeway Bay, entrance is around the corner on Percival St. tel 2838 8811

'Modern Chinese'... hmmm, this sounds like a question for aprilmei.
Hong Kong Dave

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#4 origamicrane

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Posted 08 November 2004 - 09:38 AM

hey just going to hitch hike on this thread currently in hk too
and looking for the macau restaurant that serves roast baby pigeon (yu garp)
now there's meant to be too in tsim sha tsui on a road running oppostie to mrt station. anyone got an address for either of them?
thanks in advance
"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

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#5 HKDave

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Posted 08 November 2004 - 08:18 PM

hey just going to hitch hike on this thread currently in hk too
and looking for the macau restaurant that serves roast baby pigeon (yu garp)
now there's meant to be too in tsim sha tsui on a road running oppostie to mrt station. anyone got an address for either of them?
thanks in advance

View Post

It's on Lock Road. That's the road behind the Hyatt, parallel to and one block west of Nathan Road. Macau Restaurant is near the Haiphong Road end of Lock Road. Tsimshatsui MTR Exit A1 is very close.
Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

#6 origamicrane

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Posted 10 November 2004 - 09:39 AM

hey just going to hitch hike on this thread currently in hk too
and looking for the macau restaurant that serves roast baby pigeon (yu garp)
now there's meant to be too in tsim sha tsui on a road running oppostie to mrt station. anyone got an address for either of them?
thanks in advance

View Post

It's on Lock Road. That's the road behind the Hyatt, parallel to and one block west of Nathan Road. Macau Restaurant is near the Haiphong Road end of Lock Road. Tsimshatsui MTR Exit A1 is very close.

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:biggrin: cool thanks will got here for lunch tomorrow :)
"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

#7 origamicrane

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Posted 11 November 2004 - 08:15 PM

:laugh: went yesterday
yummy really nice juicy and flavourful. :laugh:
and the pork chop bun was nice too :)
will have to go back to try the curry crab next time.

actually went to Tai ping Koon for their giant souffle have to admit it taste wasn;t amazing but it was definitely a feast for the eyes!! a souffle the size of my head (big!!!)
"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

#8 SBonner

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 01:06 PM

I'm in HK for five days later this year and would like any suggestions for Chinese restaurants with great selections of wine by the glass.

Thank you,

Stephen
Vancouver
"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

#9 Ben Hong

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 01:38 PM

Hmmmm?? From my experience with the "second tier" restaurants (where the food evokes less guilt in the mind and less pain in the wallet) I am of the belief that these places are not the ones that one would look for fine wines in. The restaurants that I would not go to, that is the top tier group (unless it was for business or a banquet), you might find that they would "maybe" sell you wine by the glass.

If the Chinese are going to drink any alcohol with their meals, it would be a Napoleon or something with Xs and Os in the appellation. At the very least a Johnny Walker Blue, if a person is feeling a bit penurious. :raz: For the average Chinese ,to order a wine by the glass would be tres, tres gauche as the very act would be looked on as stinginess personified, selfishness incarnate, and evocative of a feeling of being down on one's luck.

With regards to fine wines, the majority of the Chinese are not connoisseurs or even experienced imbibers. That is maybe the only gustatory shortcoming that we have.

Of course all of the preceding is from my own feelings, observances and experiences, so don't take it as "da gospel". Others with different and better viewpoints will chime in.

#10 canucklehead

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 02:13 PM

I agree with Ben that you will be probably looking at pretty high end Chinese places in HK in order to get wine by the glass. These will be mostly french wines and expensive (heavy artillery petrus', margaux, etc...).

Part of the reason for not having wine by the glass is that wine storage (given climate and storage space issues) is very difficult in HK - and the restaraunt will not want to have a half opened bottle at the end of the evening. Also - Chinese food is usually eaten in large groups so a bottle of wine could be consumed by the table fairly quickly. And as Ben also pointed out - Cognacs and other spirits would probably be a more common choice.

Hotel Chinese restaurants will benefit from having expertise in wines from the hotel's other restaurant and may offer selections by the glass. Your best bests are Spring Moon at the Peninsula and perhaps Summer Palace at the Island Shangrila. I don't think the chinese restaurant in the Mandarin Hotel is that great - but you may want to check that out also.

Outside of Hotels - the only place that I can think of that may offer this kind of service is Fook Lum Moon (high end Cantonese) which has a very high proportion of Japanese clientele. The private clubs may also have wine by the glasses with the Hong Kong Jockey Club and HK Country Clubs being the best bets.

My favorite HK restaurant is Farm House in Causeway Bay (NOT the crappy chain of western style food places) - which serves excellent home style Cantonese food - they would have a good wine list - but I would be very surprised if they offered wines by the glass.

SBonner - I will ask around my HK friends and see what they say.

#11 SBonner

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 04:28 PM

Hmmmm?? From my experience with the "second tier" restaurants (where the food evokes less guilt in the mind and less pain in the wallet) I am of the belief that these places are not the ones that one would look for fine wines in. The restaurants that I would not go to, that is the top tier group (unless it was for business or a banquet), you might find that they would "maybe" sell you wine by the glass.

If the Chinese are going to drink any alcohol with their meals, it would be a Napoleon or something with Xs and Os in the appellation. At the very least a Johnny Walker Blue, if  a person is feeling a bit penurious. :raz:  For the average Chinese ,to order a wine by the glass would be tres, tres gauche as the very act would be looked on as stinginess personified, selfishness incarnate, and evocative of a feeling of being down on one's luck.

With regards to fine wines, the majority of the  Chinese are not connoisseurs or even experienced imbibers. That is maybe the only gustatory shortcoming that we have.

Of course all of the preceding is from my own feelings, observances and experiences, so don't take it as "da gospel". Others with different and better viewpoints will chime in.

View Post



Thanks for the feedback...fortunately we have friends at the Jockey Club and Yacht Club so I'm guessing the wine options are a possibilty there. My wife and I usually drink wine by the bottle but with 6, 8, or 10 course meals it would be nice to have a wider variety of wines to taste and drink. Cognac and Scotch are okay at night but abit much for lunch...even when I'm on holiday. :smile:

Thank you.

Cheers,

Stephen

Edited by SBonner, 16 August 2005 - 04:30 PM.

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

#12 annachan

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 05:21 PM

I agree with others that it's difficult to get wine by the glass. I would really recommend some higher end hotels (Peninsula, Mandarin Oriental, Excelsior, etc.) for that. And of course, the Jockey Club and the Yacht Club would definitely be good options. I think the Craigengower Cricket Club may serve wine by the glass at their Chinese restaurant as well.

#13 aprilmei

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 07:54 PM

I can't think of any Chinese restaurants here with "great" by the glass selections. In fact, it's rare even in Hong Kong Western restaurants to find really extensive wines by the glass (there are exceptions, however). For most Chinese restaurants - if they have a wine list at all - you have to buy by-the-bottle; if they do sell by-the-glass it's limited to one red and one white.
I don't know about the clubs, though, because when I go to dinners there, the whole meal with appropriate wines have already been selected. So I've never actually seen any of their wine lists.
Canucklehead is right that if a Chinese restaurant does serve wine, it will be expensive and mostly French bottles, primarily Bordeaux and Burgundies. And he's also right about Farm House being very good. It's in AIA Centre, Causeway Bay.

#14 hzrt8w

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 12:41 AM

I'm in HK for five days later this year and would like any suggestions for Chinese restaurants with great selections of wine by the glass.

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What is your yardstick for "great" selections? French? Californian?

Hong Kongers prefer brandy (Cognac... from VS to XO), yes... drink during dinner not after dinner... over wine.

Hard to find Chinese restaurants which serve wine. Let alone with great selections. Let alone by the glass.
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#15 HKDave

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 01:17 AM

Hong Kongers prefer brandy (Cognac... from VS to XO), yes... drink during dinner not after dinner... over wine.

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This was true years ago, for those that could afford it. I can't remember the last time I saw a bottle of XO on a dinner table here. That trend has thankfully been fading out, and now serving Cognac with the meal would be considered old-fashioned or even gauche. You are more likely to see wine being served at a classy Chinese dinner in HK these days. When Frescobaldi hosted a recent wine dinner in HK, they did it in a Chinese restaurant.

The best wine selections in HK Chinese restaurants are indeed the ones in hotels or clubs, where they can draw off the same list as their western F+B outlets. I haven't been to any with a great selection by the glass.
Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

#16 jokhm

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 09:29 PM

Title description says it all. I'll be coming to Guangzhou and then on to HK for a total of 10 days. The GZ trip is all taken care of and a big group of Hunanese are going to show me food until I drop. HK however, is another story, as I will touring the Toy fair by day and eating with my vegetarian-Canadian co-worker by night. I'm sure there are great vegetarian chinese food places, but I am not terribly interested in that.. Still want to know if you have seen or been to great ones though. My focus is on getting a good Indian food fix while I'm in town, simply because it breaks my wallet in Beijing and Shanghai, and it isn't always that great either. Every time I'm in HK I have the urge to eat indian food everywhere, but I never know where specifically to go. I'm the absolute worst with choices and decisions, so I just don't go for indian while I'm there. That, and I'm usually not with vegetarians, so I want as much of the best HK food as possible!!!

making sense? mmm

#17 HKDave

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 07:43 PM

The place for cheap Indian eats in HK is Chunking Mansions, a warren of run-down apartments on Nathan Road beside the Holiday Inn. There are restaurants scattered throughout the buildings. Previous post on Chunking Mansions here: http://forums.egulle...ndpost&p=758047

For something much more upscale, but still Indian and veggie-friendly, there's Veda: http://www.veda.com.hk An Indian veggie friend of mine considers this his favorite restaurant in HK. There's a menu with prices on the website.
Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

#18 jokhm

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Posted 26 December 2005 - 11:05 AM

Ah great. So you think I can easily find what I'm looking for CK mansions? Great. I've walked by a million times and because I don't have a clear idea on which restaurant to trust exactly I just continue walking! So now you mention Khyber Pass... Excellent. I can't wait. Veda looks amazing.. but I'll have to inquire on my co-workers budget. I'm pretty sure it can be fit in..
He's also a bit too easily anxious to walk into places he probably shouldn't be in. He had police trail him in Guangzhou once because of his choice of solitary-night-walk path. Thanks again, and I'll let you knowo how it is. Finally good Indian food without the flight back to Canada..

#19 HKDave

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Posted 28 December 2005 - 12:35 AM

Khyber Pass is not radically better than other Chungking Mansions (sorry about the earlier spelling, 'Chungking' is correct) dives, but I've eaten there many times and it's cheap by HK standards, reliable and has some veggie dishes. If you don't look like a tourist, ask them for the '10% discount you gave me last time'! They also deliver in the neighbourhood.

More HK veggie places here: http://members.tripod.com/hkveg/ - weird interface.
And here: http://www.ivu.org/h.../gb/hkrest.html
A place in TST both mention is Branto. I haven't tried it, but have heard good things.

A few more Indian places I've tried, all veg-friendly:
Ashoka, in Central: upscale.
Gaylord, on Lock Rd in TST: classy, popular with the upscale Indian family crowd, but the cooking doesn't impress.
Koh-i-noor, locations in TST and Central: relatively cheap, an option if with someone who is too frightened to go into Chungking Mansions.
Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

#20 aprilmei

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Posted 28 December 2005 - 04:15 PM

I agree with HKDave about Veda - it's excellent. Expensive but worth it; the food is very different from most of the regular Indian restaurants in Hong Kong.

I've also been to Branto's and I like it a lot. It's a pure vegetarian Indian place. It's across the street from the Kowloon Shangri-La.

#21 Tae.Lee

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 01:19 AM

excellent!

i'm going to HK in january for my honeymoon, and my fiance is semi-vegetarian [she eats seafood and eggs], so this is good info.. cheers! :)

some of the temples also serve vegetarian meals too, if my research is correct..

Edited by Tae.Lee, 29 December 2005 - 01:20 AM.


#22 anil

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 08:09 AM

There are lots of seafood restaurants in the outlying islands which are relatively inexpensive. I would avoid CK Mansion for Indian food; they are inexpensive alright.

Lin Po Monestary offers Vegetarian meals.
anil

#23 jokhm

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 08:51 AM

That Branto's sounds great, and I'll likely be staying nearby too. Any of the monestaries known for particularly good food??

#24 infernooo

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 01:01 AM

Hi there,

I posted this some time ago, but since I have been back, I still stand by my recommendations.

http://forums.egulle...1

#25 hzrt8w

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 11:36 PM

Lin Po Monestary offers Vegetarian meals.

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I think you meant "Po Lin Temple" in Lantau Island? I had their famous vegetarian lunch at the temple a few years back. I think it's a hype. Or perhaps they didn't serve the best vegetarian dishes unless you buy some premium tickets. My impression of it was only so-so. Perhaps my expectation was too high.

I do like visiting the temple every time I went back to Hong Kong. It has gone through many changes over the past 30 some years. Since they had built the giant buddha statue, they drew ever more tourists. It used to be a one day trip to visit Po Lin: Taking a ferry from Central to Mui Wo, then transfer to a small bus to climb up the >1000 ft elevation. After the Chek Lap Kok Airport was completed, you can take the subway to Tung Chung and transfer to a small bus to climb up there. It cuts the travel time significantly. The latest I heard... they are building a cable car to go from Tung Chung up to the temple. It was due to open for operation by Chinese New Year 2006 but I am not sure if there are delays. The cable car would be really convenient. Definitely worths visiting. I think it's okay to taste their vegetarian meal but just don't have high expectation.
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#26 magic168

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 01:57 AM

I have 3 days in Hong Kong, staying in TST area...what're some "must haves" in these categories:

- Dim Sum
- Snacks/Desserts (Egg Custard Tarts, etc.)
- Dinner? I'd like to stay mainly with Cantonese style food, including a keen interest in Peking Duck.
- Lunch and PERHAPS dinners in Macau?


Looking forward to recommendations! Thanks!

#27 insomniac

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 03:09 AM

An oldie but a goodie for peking duck and other Pekinese food etc is Spring Deer 42 Mody Road ( up the stairs).
my dim sum favs are on the island...I'm sure someone will step in with TST recommendations.
for egg tarts I personally prefer the Portuguese ones in Macau, there's a bakery in the village of Coloane that makes sublime tarts, Lord Stows...........also like Litoral near A Ma temple and the famous Fernando at Hac Sa beach for dinner, the latter is a sort of sand between the toes experience, can bus it or chicken out and take a taxi. (Haven't been to Macau for 2 yrs, apparently the Vegas casinos have changed its face, no more spitting on the carpet and hookers in shredded stockings on the prowl)

#28 SMMiller

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 08:35 AM

There are plenty of very good places for Dim Sum all over HKG. I'll assume you want a differentiated experience that you will not find elsewhere.

You should make reservations in advance for these gourmet dim sum options:

Yan Toh Heen at the Intercontinental in TST

http://hongkong-ic.d...honic/di01.html

Lung King Heen at the Four Seasons on HKG island

http://www.fourseaso..._king_heen.html

If you are looking for the bustling dim sum house with the carts; Maxim's in City Hall is a good choice. You won't be wowed by the dim sum like the ones above, but you will certainly enjoy the grand room & view and very good dim sum that is the same quality as the best places in NY or SF or Vancouver.

Enjoy your trip!

#29 annachan

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 10:44 AM

Spring Deer is what I grew up with. Peking Duck is what it's famous for and you used to see celebrities stand in lane waiting for tables there. The original owners have left and it's not as popular anymore. But still, reservations are recommended.

For Egg Tart, there's this place in Central called Egg Tart King. I don't know the exact location. It's on a small street/alley way. Perhaps it's possible to look it up in Yellow Pages in HK.

For snacks, Causaway Bay has a lot to offer. Right in the center of the shopping area, there is a triangular shop that is opened up on two side of the streets. The last 2 times in HK, we stayed closed by there and would get snacks there almost everyday. Waffles (filled with butter, sugar, condense milk and peanut butter), egg puffs, pan-fried chive dumplings, fish balls, siu mai, stuffed vegetables (peppers, eggplants, etc.), and more! Also, there are many other food/snack stalls in the area where you can find roasted chestnuts, grilled dried squids, rice rolls, etc. I believe there is night markets around the area as well that offers up late night eats.

Another option for snacks is to go to various bakeries. In Causeway Bay, there are bakeries inside the Japanese department stores that usually have good pastries and breads.

I'm not too familiar with TST, but I believe that you can find snack options on the street.

#30 SMMiller

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 12:20 PM

Found this great report on Chow Hound. Now I'm looking for another good excuse to go back to Hong Kong!

http://www.chowhound.com/topics/385412