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eGfoodblog: Pille

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#61 Rehovot

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 12:13 AM

Thanks for the great blog and photos, Pille; I especially love the market photos (and the ones of your bookshelves and study!). :smile:

#62 Abra

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 01:46 AM

Haggis towers! Now that has to be a first for an eG blog. Haggis towers.

I've never heard of sea buckthorn berries and can't imagine whether we have anything like that in the US. Do they grow by the sea?

I'm really struck by the home-prepared mushrooms available for sale in the market. That's something you'd never see in the US, as home-prepared foods are considered to be potentially hazardous, and home-foraged mushrooms are too, and the combination offered for sale would have the Food Police all over that vendor in a nanosecond!

#63 Pille

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 03:50 AM

Wednesdays are my longest days, at least this autumn. I've got a cookery class from 4-7pm, and a photography class from 7-10pm. A substantial lunch was therefore needed, to last me until the late evening (though I'm bound to grab a chocolate between classes :rolleyes: ) I won't be cooking any dinner tonight, as I get home way too late. Kristjan will be having the leftover haggis from yesterday, so he's fine, too :laugh:

There's a very nice and light cafeteria just down the road from the university, called Cafe Peterson. They do both breakfasts and lunches, offering a hot cereal porridge for the former, a daily soup and short daily menu for the latter, in addition to cakes, salads, quiches and a la carte menu. You can also order various cakes and pastries and kringles from the cafe - quite popular among people who don't bake themselves. Many people have their favourite cafe/bakery they turn to when they need a 2-kilogram kringle or a fancy cake for their own or their child's birthday. I've never ordered a full quiche or cake from them, although I've tried many of them when I've eaten at cafe. And they inspired one of my great recent baking successes, a pear and blue cheese quiche that I can see myself making again and again during the Christmas season (you can see a picture here).

Today's soup was chicken and knedle soup, and you can see the soup container on the far right:

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It's popular with people from nearby offices - university, few banks, the National Audit Office. It's connected to a small art gallery in the back, and has a slightly bohemian feel to it. It tended to attract heavy-smoking intellectuals as well, but luckily smoking is forbidden in all cafes, bars and restaurants in Estonia now, so I don't have to worry about sensitive eyes and stinking clothes after lunch anymore :wink:

I meet my university friend Rutt for lunch once every week, and Cafe Peterson is the chosen venue, as it's conveniently located exactly in the middle of our respective work places (Tallinn University for me, National Audit Office for her), and it's a great opportunity to catch up. We both chose the same dish from today's special menu - Mozzarella and Eggplant/Aubergine casserole (50 EEK). The dish was served with a lightly dressed white cabbage and radish salad:

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Nothing spectacular, but still a very satisfying homey meal (the food is prepared in a tiny kitchen in the back). Other today's special dishes included the above-mentioned soup, mushroom risotto, honey-glazed chicken, and some fish dishes.

#64 Pille

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 04:02 AM

Now something for all those of you who celebrated Rosh Hashanah recently :smile: . While Cafe Peterson will continue to be one of my regular lunch places, I'm also very excited about this new 'venue' just across the road from there:

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Tallinn got a new Jewish Synagogue (Juudi Sünagoog) recently - it was officially opened on May 16, 2007 by Shimon Peres, and the President and the Prime Minister of Estonia. I'm not a Jew (like majority of Estonians, and our Finnish and other Nordic neighbours, I'm a Lutheran), but ever since reading Claudia Roden's wonderful and informative book on Jewish food, I've been fascinated about the cuisine. I spoke to an old guy in front of the synagogue last Friday, and he proudly informed me that a Kosher restaurant will be opened to the general public in October, and that it'll be the best restaurant in town :biggrin: I'll be there checking it out as soon as it opens.

Here are two more photos of the new synagogue - quite a fancy building, don't you think? The architects were Tõnis Kimmel & Kaur Stöör from KOKO Arhitektid.

a beautiful front door:
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a view from the side:
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Edited by Pille, 19 September 2007 - 04:04 AM.


#65 Pille

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 04:16 AM

Extremely interesting lighting in this photograph. Beautiful.

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Thank you, Michelle! The small coffee table we had was cluttered, so I placed my plate on one of the small wall lights :cool:

Pille
I am anxious to learn more about your country, because unlike Sandy, I didn't pay attention too much in school. :raz:  Your pictures are absolutely lovely!  Thanks for sharing your week.

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LucyLou - thank you for your kind words about the pictures, and I hope I'll be able to introduce my little country over the week.

Thanks for the great blog and photos, Pille; I especially love the market photos (and the ones of your bookshelves and study!). :smile:

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I like my bookshelves and study, too, Rehovot!

Haggis towers!  Now that has to be a first for an eG blog.  Haggis towers.
I've never heard of sea buckthorn berries and can't imagine whether we have anything like that in the US.  Do they grow by the sea?
I'm really struck by the home-prepared mushrooms available for sale in the market.  That's something you'd never see in the US, as home-prepared foods are considered to be potentially hazardous, and home-foraged mushrooms are too, and the combination offered for sale would have the Food Police all over that vendor in a nanosecond!

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Re:haggis towers - I have only seen them twice before, in two various branches of Peckhams restaurants in Edinburgh. Hope they're not too tacky, Abra? :unsure:
Re: sea buckthorns - they grow in many gardens, and have been hugely popular in Estonia over the last decade or so. My granny has one in her garden, too!
And finally, mushrooms. It's ok to sell wild mushrooms at the market, as long as they're fresh and whole. I'm actually not sure if it's legal to sell non-commercially salted/pickled/dried mushrooms at the market, but considering that this has been done throughout the summer, I think it could be. Lots of wild mushrooms prepared in various ways are sold at the regular supermarkets as well. One Finnish foodblogger friend of mine was in Tallinn last December, and bought 6 kilograms of salted and pickled wild mushrooms from one shop- that's a lot of mushrooms!!! Apparently the cashier had looked rather amused :laugh:

#66 Pille

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 04:29 AM

I was in Tallinn several years ago, wow what a beautiful place, my brother in law is british and this is where we went for the stag party.  I know nothing of estonia, except that some of my family is from the area.  The most beautiful women I have ever seen were everywhere there.  It was a trip I would never forget.  I ate at a wonderful very upscale restaurant between old town and port I think.  Anyway it was basically a tasting menu that was several courses, very avant garde for estonia in 2003, in my opinion.  Everything was very local, mostly french technique, there was a nightclub upstairs, thats about what I remember.  Quite trendy though, curious if its still there.

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Ok, I spoke to Kristjan, and he knew straight away the place you were talking about. He obviously knows Tallinn's night club scene much better than I do, actually much better than I thought he would know :raz:
If he's right, then the place you had a tasting menu is called Ö (yep, just one funny letter), where the Chef de Cuisine is a young Estonian Russian guy Roman Zastserinski. He was actually named the Chef of the Year by the Estonian Gastronomy Society in 2005. I've never eaten in Ö myself (yet), but as I attended the Estonian Gastronomy Society's 2006 Gala Dinner in early January, I've eaten his food - the previous year's winner designs and prepares the menu for next year's gala dinner (you can read about the gala menu here).

So yes, he's still there, and he's still going strong.

#67 Kouign Aman

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 07:05 AM

How does one prepare salted mushrooms?
Fresh clean mushrooms and salt and time?
How salty are they? That salad sounds tasty.
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#68 Jensen

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 08:39 AM

Pille, what are knedle? noodles? dumplings? something else?

#69 monavano

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 09:58 AM

Pille, you are continuting to inspire me! I made Polish mushroom soup last night (post here), and now I have to make something with pears and blue cheese :wub: .

#70 lexy

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 10:06 AM

How does one prepare salted mushrooms?
Fresh clean mushrooms and salt and time?
How salty are they? That salad sounds tasty.

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Just what I was going to ask - I love pickles and I love mushrooms, and I'm anxious to try these :smile:

Also, I love the Moomin kitchen-ware. That alone is enough to tempt me to make a trip to Estonia (also, some friends went last Christmas and loved it)
Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

#71 Pontormo

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 10:30 AM

Pille: This is really an interesting tour of Estonia. Thank you! Your wild mushrooms are exquisite and I am looking forward to learning how to use up the rest of a bag of rye flour I purchased fairly recently. The loaf photographed at the beginning of this food blog is lovely--as is your own blog.

I have only one question. Where might you find a better pizza: Edinburgh or Tallinn?

Okay, maybe two. How open is Estonia to the foods and dishes of other countries whose traditions are quite unlike its own?
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The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

#72 Pille

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 01:26 PM

Pille, what are knedle? noodles? dumplings? something else?

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Jensen - they're small plain dumplings, about 2 cm in diameter. No filling, just a mixture of eggs, flour and some milk usually.

Pille, you are continuting to inspire me! I made Polish mushroom soup last night (post here), and now I have to make something with pears and blue cheese :wub: .

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So you liked the picture of that pear & blue cheese tart, Monavano? :rolleyes:

Also, I love the Moomin kitchen-ware. That alone is enough to tempt me to make a trip to Estonia (also, some friends went last Christmas and loved it)

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Moomin books & cartoons are very popular here, and there's even a Moomin magazine for children these days! Moomin tableware is newish for Estonians, I think, and not everything is available here. For example, the dark blue mug is Christmas 2006 special edition, and I had to get that from Finland, as they weren't selling them in Estonia at all :shock:

Pille:  This is really an interesting tour of Estonia.  Thank you!  Your wild mushrooms are exquisite and I am looking forward to learning how to use up the rest of a bag of rye flour I purchased fairly recently.  The loaf photographed at the beginning of this food blog is lovely--as is your own blog.
I have only one question.  Where might you find a better pizza: Edinburgh or Tallinn?
Okay, maybe two.  How open is Estonia to the foods and dishes of other countries whose traditions are quite unlike its own?

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I hope to blog about my rye bread tomorrow, Pontormo! Now, your pizza question. I don't eat pizza often, and I've only got very vague memories of eating it in Edinburgh (I'd usually go for gnocchi in Italian restaurants). However, I do remember eating very good thin crust pizza in Controvento, one of the older Italian places here in Tallinn. They've got this very lovely and cosy restaurant in Katariina Käik, a small street alley full of handicraft workshops in Old Tallinn. Highly recommended!

Michelle & Lexy - I'll get back to you about salting mushrooms soon, but first I need a good night's sleep - it's been a long, long day. :blink:

Head ööd!

#73 Pam R

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 02:04 PM

I spoke to an old guy in front of the synagogue last Friday, and he proudly informed me that a Kosher restaurant will be opened to the general public in October, and that it'll be the best restaurant in town  :biggrin: I'll be there checking it out as soon as it opens.

I'm enjoying your blog tremendously. I always love to see soups in blogs, and of course, this line about a kosher restaurant caught my attention. Is there a demand for one?

#74 MagFoodGuy

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 06:36 PM

I just wanted to say what an interesting blog and what beautiful photographs!

#75 mizducky

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 07:31 PM

Pille, what are knedle? noodles? dumplings? something else?

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Jensen - they're small plain dumplings, about 2 cm in diameter. No filling, just a mixture of eggs, flour and some milk usually.

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I'm intrigued that the word "knedle" is so similar to the Yiddish word for a matzoh ball, "kneidl," plural "kneidlach" (seeing as how matzoh balls are basically a variety of dumpling). Makes me suspect that both words have a common root--possibly/probably German?

#76 Dejah

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 07:43 PM

After seeing your "haggis tower", I am motivated to bid at the next annual Robbie Burns dinner where they always auction off several haggis (s? es?) at the end of the evening. Yours looks like a great way to serve haggis!
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#77 Jensen

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 08:44 PM

Pille, what are knedle? noodles? dumplings? something else?

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Jensen - they're small plain dumplings, about 2 cm in diameter. No filling, just a mixture of eggs, flour and some milk usually.

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I'm intrigued that the word "knedle" is so similar to the Yiddish word for a matzoh ball, "kneidl," plural "kneidlach" (seeing as how matzoh balls are basically a variety of dumpling). Makes me suspect that both words have a common root--possibly/probably German?

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Germanic, for sure.

Knödel is dumpling, in German. I'm sure the same root led to 'noodle' in English.

#78 Pille

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 12:38 AM

I'm enjoying your blog tremendously.  I always love to see soups in blogs, and of course, this line about a kosher restaurant caught my attention. Is there a demand for one?

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Pam - we eat quite a lot of soups in our home, and they're mainly main course soups - easy, healthy and nutritious. Well, it's only Thursday, so who knows, maybe there will be more :laugh:
Is there a demand for a kosher restaurant? Well, I guess the 3000 or so Jews who live in Estonia want one, and there's always demand for good restaurant and cafes. It'll be quite a large restaurant, seating 100, so they're obviously got big plans.

I just wanted to say what an interesting blog and what beautiful photographs!

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MagFoodGuy - thank you :rolleyes:

After seeing your "haggis tower", I am motivated to bid at the next annual Robbie Burns dinner where they always auction off several haggis (s? es?) at the end of the evening. Yours looks like a great way to serve haggis!

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Dejah - hope they're auctioning off good haggis!!!


I'm intrigued that the word "knedle" is so similar to the Yiddish word for a matzoh ball, "kneidl," plural "kneidlach" (seeing as how matzoh balls are basically a variety of dumpling). Makes me suspect that both words have a common root--possibly/probably German?

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Germanic, for sure.
Knödel is dumpling, in German. I'm sure the same root led to 'noodle' in English.

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Jensen, thank you for answering Mizducky's question! The Estonian word is klimp/klimbid, actually, and I thought they'd translate as knedle/knedliky rather than dumplings, which for me are larger and filled. Confusing :wacko:

#79 Pille

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 01:09 AM

Few words about last night, before I'll tell you about today's breakfast. As I said, it was a long and tiring day, so I didn't get to have dinner until 10.30pm - very untypical for me, as I usually eat dinner around 6pm or 7pm! I nibbled on some chocolates (Fazer Dumle chocolates from Finland) during the cookery school class, and grabbed a singi-seenepirukas alias a ham and mushroom pierogi from the deli counter of Stockmann food hall on the way from cookery school to photography course. No picture, as I was eating the pastry while walking on the street - very bad manners on itself :unsure: and I didn't want to make it worse by then photographing this! :laugh:

When I got home, we heated up the leftover haggis, neeps & tatties from the night before and finished the dinner with a small glass of very nice Estonian apple wine:

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Being so far up north, we're obviously not producing grape wines here in Estonia, but apple & fruit wines have been made in Põltsamaa since 1920. Põltsamaa Kuldne 1992 is a sweet dessert wine made of apples, and it's a great after-dinner drink. It's also served on official state occasions, so it's indeed a respectable drink :biggrin: I love its colour - such a wonderful deep caramel shade!

#80 Pille

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 01:28 AM

I can't believe it's already the fourth day of my foodblog!!! Time flies when you're having fun :laugh:

Breakfast today was pretty similar to yesterday's, only hot. Here's the full thing:

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There were grilled rye bread slices with ham and cheese and a sprinkle of thyme:

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We drank green Japanese tea today, a gift from Keiko of the stunning Nordljus blog (I met Keiko for a coffee when I was in Cambridge in April). Here's our new teapot:

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I fell in love with it in Denmark last November, but couldn't find it anywhere in Estonia. Finally, a Finnish foodblogging friend of mine bought one in Sweden few months ago and sent it over to Estonia for me :cool: It's a Swedish Höganäs brand, and I've written more about it here.

I sweeten my tea with an extract made with finely chopped flowering quinces, my mum's speciality. It lends a lovely sweet and sharp flavour to the tea, and a lovely fragrance. It's also delicious simply with hot water:

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Apart from grilled sandwiches and tea, we had some yogurt for breakfast. Today we opted for the cream cheese and cloudberry jam yogurts - you can see golden speckles of cloudberries here:

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Kristjan had also one banana for breakfast, I grabbed along 4 'Valge Klaar' apples from my mum's garden. I've already eaten three of them, and it's not even noon :laugh:

#81 Ondine

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 03:11 AM

What a beautiful place, so evocative and exotic! At least it seems so to myself, stuck in Australian suburbia, with nary an edible wild mushroom to be found.

Thank you so much Pille, for showing us the beauty in your life that we would never have seen any other way. :smile:

That flowering quince extract looks very interesting. Do I understand correctly that it is made from the fruit of ornamental (grown for the flowers) quince plants? How do you make it, do you have a recipe? And how long does it keep in the jar on the table; do you have to put it into the fridge?

Northern European food is almost all new to me. Those mushrooms look amazing! :biggrin:
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#82 Pille

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 04:47 AM

Okay, maybe two.  How open is Estonia to the foods and dishes of other countries whose traditions are quite unlike its own?

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Sorry, Pontormo, I overlooked this question last night. I'm going to give you a very ambivalent answer :biggrin: I think it depends a lot on the age of the person. My grandmothers (I'm lucky to have both of them still around - one is 86, the other 87) would cook a very humble and traditional fare - lots of potatoes, carrots, turnips, pork, cabbage, rye bread, sour cream, thick soups & stews etc. My parents, on the other hand, would be a bit more adventurous in their cooking, though still very simple.

Younger people who have had a chance to travel since the end of the Soviet era would probably cook happily Italian, Indian, Chinese etc for dinner. Same in our home - lots of 'exotic' dishes appear from our kitchen, although I'm also consciously trying to cook a lot of 'traditional Estonian food', as I find it comforting after such a long period abroad.

As far as ethnic restaurants go, then the whole world is probably represented. There are few great Italian places (Controvento, Bocca), some Indian (Elevant), classic French (Le Bonaparte, Egoist), Japanese (House, Silk) etc. What is unique to Tallinn restaurant scene is a good choice of excellent Russian restaurants (Troika, Klafira, the new Tchaikovsky in Telegraaf hotel, Nevskij) and Caucasian restaurants (Bakuu, Must Lammas, and many others), and even a Roma restoran (Romale) that reflects the ethnic composition of the country.

The country has currently about 68% ethnic Estonians, 26% Russians, 2% Ukrainians, 1% Finns, 1% Belorussians, plus large communities of Georgians, Aserbajianis, Armenians, Tatars etc. When I say 'large communities' take it with a pinch of salt. The whole population of Estonia is 1.3 million inhabitants. That's less than most cities in the US :laugh:

There's also a good number of very nice restaurants serving traditional Estonian food: Kuldse Notsu Kõrts, Eesti Maja, Vanaema juures, Lydia, Olde Hansa (the great medieval place), Maiasmokk. One of my favourite restaurants, Stenhus, had a wonderful Estonian special menu last year that I loved to bits!! I should go and check if they still do it..

Edited by Pille, 20 September 2007 - 11:47 PM.


#83 Abra

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 09:09 AM

I really never thought anything would inspire me to try haggis, but those towers of yours would be the thing. Haggis is probably one of those misunderstood foods, but it sounds revolting. However, all the rest of your tastes in food seem right up my alley, so I'd probably like haggis too.

That synagogue does have stunning architecture. Is it Finnish-influenced, or typically Estonian?

#84 Pille

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 12:37 PM

I needed to get something from a bookstore at Viru Keskus, a shopping centre at the city centre, and decided to have lunch there as well. Rahva Raamat (People's Book) has actually two cafes now - Bestseller on the 3rd floor, and Boulangerie on the 4th floor - both are a brainchild of Imre Kose, a young - and probably our only - 'celebrity chef', who also runs the upscale Vertigo restaurant and will open a another venture in a few months (see here). Both Bestseller & Boulangerie are good places for a quick coffee, as Viru Keskus is right in the middle of all transport routes, so it's a place I frequent quite often.

Here's the counter of Boulangerie:

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I had a coffee (30 EEK) and a salad - a Caesar salad topped with pesto chicken wrapped in ham (120 EEK). There's also a good selection of cakes and pastries, and they do a daily soup (today it was bouillabaisse) etc. Here's my salad:

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And then I rushed off for this week's last cooking class, which was on kitchen safety and various machinery used. A bit boring, to be honest :unsure:

#85 Pille

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 12:58 PM

That flowering quince extract looks very interesting. Do I understand correctly that it is made from the fruit of ornamental (grown for the flowers) quince plants? How do you make it, do you have a recipe? And how long does it keep in the jar on the table; do you have to put it into the fridge?

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Yes, you're right, Ondine! Chaenomeles are indeed grown for ornamental purposes, as they've got lovely flowers:

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There are two types of Chaenomeles in Estonia - C. speciosa and C. japonica, but I cannot tell which one my mum grows :huh: In any case, the fruit of both are edible. They're contain as much Vitamin C as lemons do, which explains why they're sometimes called 'Nordic lemon'. They're also high on citric and malic acid (and can be used instead of vinegar in canning some fruit and vegetables). Furthermore, as they've got very high pectin content, they're excellent for making jams and jellies (I made a huge batch apple and flowering quince jam last weekend). Here are some flowering quinces still attached to the bush (note that they've got no 'tail' like apples do):

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My mum's got two bushes, and they're both full of fruit this year. I got about 10 litres from her:

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And the last photo is of a cut fruit:

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Note the huge amount of seeds - there could be as many as 100 seeds per fruit! It's best to remove the seeds, as they're high on amygdalin and apparently it's not good for you :sad: For the extract you saw above, you cut the ripe fruit into small slices (no need to peel - the peel has most of the vitamin C), remove the seeds and mix the slices with an equal weight amount of sugar. Cover, and keep in a cool storage for a few weeks, until the sugar has dissolved. Shake every now and then.
The finished extract should be kept in the fridge and used as one uses sweetened lemon slices - in teas, in baking. (Ours is on the table because it's the last bit from a larger glass of extract, and it was more convenient to de-cant it into a small bowl rather than try to scoop it from a glass every morning). Instead of sugar, you can also use honey for making this extract..

I really never thought anything would inspire me to try haggis, but those towers of yours would be the thing.  Haggis is probably one of those misunderstood foods, but it sounds revolting.  However, all the rest of your tastes in food seem right up my alley, so I'd probably like haggis too.

That synagogue does have stunning architecture.  Is it Finnish-influenced, or typically Estonian?

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Abra, I hope you'll think that our food tastes are right up the same alley after you'll see my dinner pictures :laugh: I cannot say I've seen anything like this synagogue before either here or in Finland. But considering both the architects are young Estonians, it might just be a modern Estonian architecture :wink:

#86 Kouign Aman

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 01:34 PM

As someone noted, the US isnt as friendly to foragers who want to sell their goods. Check out this old topic: LA / wild mushrooms :sad: . The market mushroom ladies you've been showing us are just too cool. However, we do have a 'driveby' tamale lady in our neighborhood. :wub:
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#87 Pille

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 01:48 PM

And finally, tonight's dinner post. Suzilightning requested that I blog about exotic meats :laugh: Well, we only do pork, beef, veal, rabbit/hare, wild boar, venison, elk and brown bear here in Estonia, and none of them qualifies as exotic :wink: (though I must confess I've never had bear meat myself. If you're ever in Olde Hansa, the medieval restaurant, ask for it..) So I thought hard, and decided to go with offal instead :biggrin:

For dinner tonight we had maksakaste or Estonian liver gravy with potatoes and salted cucumber- the latter being a traditional garnish for this dish, at least according to Kristjan (I had thought of fresh cucumber and dill salad, but apparently it would have been all wrong). Here's the dish:

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The prep is easy - slice beef liver thinly, dust with flour/black pepper, quickly fry in oil with a finely chopped onion; then add cold water, stir and simmer gently for about 5-7 minutes. Add sour cream, heat through and season. Here's the full story in small fuzzy pictures - just in case offal puts some of you off :cool:

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For dessert we had Kristjan's special pudding - the squeaky Finnish bread cheese (leipäjuusto in Finnish, leibjuust in Estonian) softened in a mixture of cream, sugar and rum, and served with a dollop of cloudberry jam (Eden, take note!!!):

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The only acceptable accompaniment for that dessert is a honey-coloured cloudberry liqueur - murakaliköör - from Finnish Lapponia. As you can see, we're eating this dessert quite often: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

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Terviseks!!! - that's cheers in Estonian, or 'for your health'. I've met quite a few foreigners who know this as their only word in Estonian. I wonder why? :laugh:

Time for bed, I'm afraid. Tomorrow I'll have lunch in a very nice place near university, and after work we're going to see a play at Linnateater (Marie Jones' Stones In Your Pocket. I've seen it in Edinburgh before, so I'm quite excited to see how they compare).

Edited by Pille, 21 September 2007 - 11:12 AM.


#88 Kent D

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 08:13 PM

Wow, these pictures and commentary are so interesting that you actually made haggis and liver look GOOD. I'm still not eating any, but the seed has been planted!
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“A favorite dish in Kansas is creamed corn on a stick.”
-Jeff Harms, actor, comedian.
>Enjoying every bite, because I don't know any better...

#89 scottie

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 10:49 PM

And finally, tonight's dinner post. Suzilightning requested that I blog about exotic meats  :laugh:  Well, we only do pork, beef, veal, rabbit/hare, wild boar, venison, elk and brown bear here in Estonia, and none of them qualifies as exotic  :wink:  (though I must confess I've never had bear meat myself. If you're ever in Olde Hansa, the medieval restaurant, ask for it..) So I thought hard, and decided to go with offal instead  :biggrin:


I'd say bear qualifies as fairly exotic here in the U.S., or at least unusual, although there are certainly a few people around who hunt it and eat it.

Heck, even venison and rabbit qualify as exotic to a lot of people. I have known people who were seriously freaked out by the idea of eating rabbit. Fortunately for me, my dad did a lot of hunting when I was kid. He never brought home a bear, though!

So, can you buy bear meat in the market in Estonia? How about horse?

#90 scottie

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 11:29 PM

It seems like Estonians do a lot of foraging, for mushrooms, berries, etc. When you go foraging, is it typically on public lands? Private lands? Do you have to pay a fee or get a license?

The sale of foraged foods is pretty strictly regulated here. In some places or for some things you have to get a license or a pass, for example to forage for mushrooms in the state forests of Oregon. I think there you have to buy a day pass.

In other places, there is a strict season, and if you are caught foraging out-of-season, you can get fined. For example, in areas of the southern Appalachians there is a limited season for ginseng, aka "sang", to reduce over-foraging.


Did you ever do anything with your green tomatoes? Here is how I make them:

Heat a cast-iron skillet.
Slice tomatoes to about 1/4" thickness.
Dredge the slices in seasoned (salt and pepper, maybe a little cayenne) cornmeal, or in a mix of cornmeal and flour.
Add bacon fat to the hot skillet.
When the fat is hot, put in a few slices- don't overcrowd.
Let the tomatoes cook for a bit, don't stir them around. Flip them over when the bottoms are nice and golden, then cook until the other side is golden, too.
Be careful not to burn them! Cornmeal burns pretty easily.

Drain the fried tomato slices to a plate lined with paper towels, then serve while hot with some spicy mayo or whatever dipping sauce you like. Remoulade is traditional.
You can also fry them in butter.

These are really good when hot. I like them for breakfast with fried eggs.





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