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Japanese Cooking at Home


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#151 Thanks for the Crepes

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Posted 21 March 2015 - 02:11 PM

rotuts,

 

The asian sweet potatoes I can get that make good fries look like the first two images in this link: https://www.google.c...DA&ved=0CEMQ7Ak


I want to move to another planet, with pure spring water.

 

This planet would have a global climate like Hawaii, California, Florida.

 

We'd raise perfect and abundant flora and fauna!

 

Want to come with?

 

 


#152 rotuts

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Posted 21 March 2015 - 02:18 PM

thanks for that

 

as the snow is melting.

 

I might go to the AsianEmporium tomorrow to look for those

 

I also get 'baby bok choy'  the deep green ones

 

they go from 1.25 to 1.50 an LBS

 

my local WhiteBread emporium  for an odd reason had some in a bag

 

on ice

 

$ 5.99 an LBS

 

pays for the gas


Edited by rotuts, 21 March 2015 - 02:19 PM.


#153 Thanks for the Crepes

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Posted 21 March 2015 - 11:38 PM

rotuts,

 

I hope you can find them and make good, crispy fries from them. They always work out for me. They have a drier consistency, and crisp up much better than the orange ones we grow right here in NC.

 

I think they give them a tempura treatment in some Asian countries, but I have good luck with them unbattered even as oven fries just coated with a little oil and roasted at high temp. I always peel them because the skin is a little thick and tough.

 

And, yeah, there are a lot of bargains and very interesting ingredients to be found at your local Asian market. It's one of my favorite places to explore.


I want to move to another planet, with pure spring water.

 

This planet would have a global climate like Hawaii, California, Florida.

 

We'd raise perfect and abundant flora and fauna!

 

Want to come with?

 

 


#154 rotuts

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 04:37 AM

"""   oven fries just coated with a little oil and roasted at high temp.  """

 

this is my plan.  also thanks for the tip on the skin.   I usually try not to peel.



#155 Anna N

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 03:14 PM

image.jpg

Nikujaga (meat and potatoes).


image.jpg

Drop lid anyone?
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#156 Thanks for the Crepes

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Posted 23 March 2015 - 12:29 AM

rotus,

 

Please let us know how your Asian sweet potato oven fry experiment turns out either way.

 

I know you have a steam oven, but I don't think that would enhance this project. You want to eliminate moisture, not add it.


I want to move to another planet, with pure spring water.

 

This planet would have a global climate like Hawaii, California, Florida.

 

We'd raise perfect and abundant flora and fauna!

 

Want to come with?

 

 


#157 rotuts

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Posted 23 March 2015 - 04:53 AM

I plan to use the BV-XL

 

Ill let you know   didnt go to the ChinaMart yest.  perhaps next week.

 

I buy too many pork buns  ( refrigerated and frozen ) and gobble then up non-stop

 

:huh:



#158 Duvel

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 07:55 AM

Thanks to Anna N I felt the urge to make significant amounts of Nikuman recently. Aside from my non-existing folding skills they turned out nice: dough was basically the same as Anna's while for the filling I used minced fatty pork, soy/mirin/sesame oil, tons of scallions and a couple of spoon full of grated ginger. Very satisfying on a sunday afternoon ...

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#159 Anna N

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 02:24 PM

Thanks to Anna N I felt the urge to make significant amounts of Nikuman recently. Aside from my non-existing folding skills they turned out nice: dough was basically the same as Anna's while for the filling I used minced fatty pork, soy/mirin/sesame oil, tons of scallions and a couple of spoon full of grated ginger. Very satisfying on a sunday afternoon ...


Glad to see you attempted these. My main complaint with those I made was the thickness of the dough on the top. I researched various recipes and it seems that the more skilled makers somehow manage to thin out the edges of the circle of dough to overcome this. It will take much more practice on my part to figure that out. The pleating and twisting of those pleats naturally increases the amount of dough on the top.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

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#160 Anna N

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 02:38 PM

image.jpg
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
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#161 Hassouni

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 03:11 PM

Question for those who've lived in Japan, or are Japanese, or are otherwise very knowledgeable about Japanese culture.

 

One of the things I like so much about Japanese food is the concept of ichiju sansai, which means lots of variety and vegetable intake. However, I live alone and three dishes + soup is really not feasible most of the time, unless I'm cooking for others. It seems to me that *most* Japanese dishes besides nabemono and some nimono are not mixed but rather focused on a single ingredient.

 

I'm curious how solo cooking in Japan generally goes: are there non-nabe dishes that feature a collection of ingredients? Do people tend to cook the full three dishes? 

 

I'm not cooking as much as I used to (especially not Japanese food) and really want to get back at it.


Edited by Hassouni, 29 March 2015 - 03:11 PM.


#162 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 12:07 AM

Tonight was a clear soup prepared as above, rice, blanched broccolini (which I have to thank for getting my Baron shaker unstuck) with sesame dressing (Japanese Cooking a Simple Art, second edition, p 253).  I do love sesame dressing.  Sautéed eggplant, which was not so wonderful.  Daikon pickle and umeboshi.



#163 Anna N

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 04:13 AM

Two recent dishes.

image.jpg

Japanese fried rice enfolded in an omelette.

image.jpg

Braised chicken and vegetables.
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

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#164 mkayahara

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 06:25 AM

Your omurice looks perfect, Anna! How did it taste?


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#165 Anna N

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 04:01 PM

Your omurice looks perfect, Anna! How did it taste?


Thank you. I truly think it can be improved upon. Like fried rice in any cuisine there are likely as many different ingredients used as there are cooks. This needed something more. And strangely I am not a fan of ketchup and might've enjoyed it more with a tonkatsu-like sauce. But this is all new to me and I can enjoy the process even when the end result doesn't quite measure up. A fried rice filled omelette is so minimally more complicated than simple fried rice that I was intrigued by the very idea.
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#166 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 02 April 2015 - 12:20 AM

Not exactly Japanese but Japanese inspired leftovers:  first course was dashi from the other day.  Not quite as good as fresh although still quite refreshing.  Then some mashed potatoes that I intended to serve with daikon pickle but I forgot.  Followed by a seven spice powder omelet.  I confess a French style omelet but it turned out perfectly.



#167 Anna N

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 09:32 AM

image.jpg

I was thrilled when Kerry Beal spotted these shishito peppers at Trader Joe's in Buffalo this past Wednesday.

For those of you unfamiliar with them they are very mild for the most part but about 1 in 10 will pack some heat. In this small batch just one startled me. The heat is definitely there but by no means is it unpleasant, at least not for me. It adds a note of adventure to a small dish.

They are so simple to prepare. Give them a good wash, no need to trim them in any way, dry them on kitchen towels and saute in hot oil until they blister and char a little. Sprinkle with an interesting salt and serve with or without dipping sauce. I just had soy sauce. Eat them with your fingers or chopsticks leaving behind the stem and calyx.

Note to those who dislike green peppers. They have none of that taste of lawn grass.
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#168 rotuts

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 10:56 AM

"""   taste of lawn grass  """

 

are you referring to Green Bell Pep's ?

 

they are always near the top of my can't stand list.  in anything.  Pico amounts I can taste.

 

I do love green chile peppers 

 

Ill look for these at My Local Tj's

 

thanks

 

( BTW enjoying your Japanese Thread )



#169 radtek

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 11:45 AM

Thank you. I truly think it can be improved upon. Like fried rice in any cuisine there are likely as many different ingredients used as there are cooks. This needed something more. And strangely I am not a fan of ketchup and might've enjoyed it more with a tonkatsu-like sauce. But this is all new to me and I can enjoy the process even when the end result doesn't quite measure up. A fried rice filled omelette is so minimally more complicated than simple fried rice that I was intrigued by the very idea.

I was thinking some Bull-Dog would zing it up a bit.

 

Omurice looks/sounds like something right up my alley.



#170 radtek

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 11:52 AM

I've been making a lot of yakisoba lately. I've found some Chinese dried alkaline noodles last week but before I just used spaghetti. Anyway, any tips on making yakisoba?

 

Youtube has cooks doing precooked noodles several ways; one being done in the pan first then returned to steam on top of the veg and meat and the other just on top with no pre-heat. 

 

I've done it both ways but it doesn't seem to make any difference really. And I like to precook dried noodles, quench them, roll up between two kitchen towels and rest in the fridge before making yakisoba.



#171 Anna N

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 12:29 PM

"""   taste of lawn grass  """
 
are you referring to Green Bell Pep's ?
 
they are always near the top of my can't stand list.  in anything.  Pico amounts I can taste.
 
I do love green chile peppers 
 
Ill look for these at My Local Tj's
 
thanks
 
( BTW enjoying your Japanese Thread )


You were exactly the person I was thinking of, rotuts. I know you hate green bell peppers almost as much as I hate them. And thank you.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#172 Anna N

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 12:32 PM

I've been making a lot of yakisoba lately. I've found some Chinese dried alkaline noodles last week but before I just used spaghetti. Anyway, any tips on making yakisoba?
 
Youtube has cooks doing precooked noodles several ways; one being done in the pan first then returned to steam on top of the veg and meat and the other just on top with no pre-heat. 
 
I've done it both ways but it doesn't seem to make any difference really. And I like to precook dried noodles, quench them, roll up between two kitchen towels and rest in the fridge before making yakisoba.


If you are asking me I cannot be much help. Made it for the first time a few days ago or perhaps a week or so, I loved it but know nothing more about it.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#173 ElsieD

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 02:42 PM

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

I was thrilled when Kerry Beal spotted these shishito peppers at Trader Joe's in Buffalo this past Wednesday.

For those of you unfamiliar with them they are very mild for the most part but about 1 in 10 will pack some heat. In this small batch just one startled me. The heat is definitely there but by no means is it unpleasant, at least not for me. It adds a note of adventure to a small dish.

They are so simple to prepare. Give them a good wash, no need to trim them in any way, dry them on kitchen towels and saute in hot oil until they blister and char a little. Sprinkle with an interesting salt and serve with or without dipping sauce. I just had soy sauce. Eat them with your fingers or chopsticks leaving behind the stem and calyx.

Note to those who dislike green peppers. They have none of that taste of lawn grass.


For what it's worth, I have seen these at Loblaws. I too hate green bell peppers, but I love the red, orange and yellow ones, preferably roasted with olive oil.

#174 Anna N

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 04:02 PM

image.jpg

Since this meal lacks both the customary soup and rice bowl one can only call it Japaneseque. Still the pork belly was astonishingly good. I don't take the credit for it because I simply followed the directions in a recipe. It was braised for some hours in sake, mirin, sugar, soy sauce and ginger before being put under the broiler. Unctuous is overused but I can't come up with a close synonym. The side dishes were Japanese-style potato salad and quick pickled broccoli stems.
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#175 rotuts

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 04:37 AM

""  quick pickled broccoli stems ""

 

were these 'vacuum' pickles ?

 

""   Japanese-style potato salad ""

 

Id like to hear more about this



#176 Anna N

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 06:56 AM

"" quick pickled broccoli stems ""

were these 'vacuum' pickles ?

"" Japanese-style potato salad ""

Id like to hear more about this

If you Google Japanese potato salad you will come up with almost as many variations as you would if you Googled North American-style potato salad. The one I made consisted of potatoes, cooked carrots, egg, cucumber and scallions. I tossed the cooked potatoes with salt and some rice vinegar, roughly mashed them and let them cool before adding the other ingredients. Final dressing was mayo. I did not have kewpie mayo on hand so it was Hellmann's.

The broccoli stems were tossed with minced garlic and salt and left to macerate for half an hour at room temperature. The exuded liquid was poured off and they were seasoned with soy, toasted sesame oil, and a little sugar. As with many Japanese condiments the word "pickled" is used quite loosely.

Edited to fix a pronoun.

Edited by Anna N, 05 April 2015 - 06:57 AM.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

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#177 weinoo

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 08:06 AM

At home...


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