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Home Made Ice Cream (2002–2012)


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#301 bigchef

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 01:31 PM

I just wonder if the bottom should be reincorporated into the milk before it is strained and added? Or maybe that would add way to much of that flavour. The russians have a baked milk drink made in the crockpot over hours and hours. I may use that milk in conjunction with the recipe you mentioned above. Some vanilla bean as well. :-)

#302 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 02:49 PM

It adds a lot of the flavour to the final product if you bring up the bottom stuff - but try it. You may find that it's a flavour you like, along with the vanilla and a teensy hint of bourbon.... Ultimately, if it's a good flavour, it doesn't matter if you follow the recipe to the letter as long as you keep track of what you did.
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#303 Tri2Cook

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 02:56 PM

I just checked my book in case I was remembering incorrectly. The milk is definitely cooked on it's own prior to the sugar or anything else joining the party so any recipe that says otherwise is that person's own adaptation. It's a 4 ingredient recipe, the "burnt" milk, some cream, sugar and egg yolks. You cook the milk, pour it off of the burnt solids and make a traditional custard with it, the cream, the sugar and the eggs. 74.98% milk (weighed after it's been "burnt" and poured off of the solids of course), 6.96% cream, 16.02% sugar and 7.04% egg yolk. His recipe is based on a 5kg batch but it scales down easily since he gives the ratios in every recipe. It's one of the best cookbook purchases I've made in terms of how much I've actually used it and learned from it.
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#304 bigchef

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 02:27 AM

Hi all! I think I may have cracked it. Place whole milk in the slow cooker and cook on low for 18 hours or until it reaches a lite golden color.

Place in high walled pot and prepare as per "burnt" milk but whisk now and again to get some specs from the bottom.

Deeply caramalise sugar before use.
Cook with double cream, egg yolks, vanilla (and bourbon if desired) and strain as per usual.
Add beurre noisette (unstrained)

MMMMMMMM what flavour!

#305 vice

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 07:52 AM

74.98% milk (weighed after it's been "burnt" and poured off of the solids of course), 6.96% cream, 16.02% sugar and 7.04% egg yolk.

Are these percentages supposed to add up to 100? I figure they should if everything is scaled to the total batch weight. Then again, I guess there could be as much as 5% loss in the process.
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#306 Tri2Cook

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 12:28 PM

I'll have to check the book again, I didn't scale off of the percentages when I did the recipe, I just did a 1/4 batch based on the ingredient weights given.
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#307 oli

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 12:46 PM

Hi all! I think I may have cracked it. Place whole milk in the slow cooker and cook on low for 18 hours or until it reaches a lite golden color.

Place in high walled pot and prepare as per "burnt" milk but whisk now and again to get some specs from the bottom.

Deeply caramalise sugar before use.
Cook with double cream, egg yolks, vanilla (and bourbon if desired) and strain as per usual.
Add beurre noisette (unstrained)

MMMMMMMM what flavour!

I am following this closely and will try it soon. When you say "Deeply caramalise sugar before use." are you saying caramalize the sugar and then add it to the "burnt milk"?
Are you calling the burnt milk the "double cream"?
Thanks

#308 bigchef

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 07:17 AM

no the recipe contains milk, double cream, sugar, vanilla, egg yolks. The milk is "baked" in the slow cooker first and "burnt". The sugar is caramalised and the milk + vanilla + brown nutter is added to it slowly. Then add the yolks and cream. Cook then strain. Cool and churn

Edited by bigchef, 16 June 2011 - 07:17 AM.


#309 bigchef

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 12:00 PM

What if I toasted milk powder in a pan till golden and added that as well? So far the icecream is AMAZING. I just wonder how much further I can push it.

#310 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 04:43 PM

Try it - powdered milk has more concentrated sugars in it than fresh/liquid milk, so you'd probably get a fairly intense caramelization by dry-toasting it. Then you might even be able to skip the step of "baking" the milk in the crockpot - if it works the way I think it will, you'll end up with instant baked milk.
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#311 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 06:07 PM

Try it - powdered milk has more concentrated sugars in it than fresh/liquid milk, so you'd probably get a fairly intense caramelization by dry-toasting it. Then you might even be able to skip the step of "baking" the milk in the crockpot - if it works the way I think it will, you'll end up with instant baked milk.

Ideas in Food uses a pressure cooker to caramelize milk powder.

#312 ChrisZ

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 07:07 PM

If you want to take it in a slightly different direction, you can caramelise white chocolate in an oven, then melt it into your base. In one of those funny coincidences that happen, last week in a local bakery they were giving out free caramelised white chocolate macarons that had broken, then when I got home there was a caramelised white chocolate mousse being made on Masterchef...
The macaron was delicious, definitely white chocolate but also definitely caramel too.

#313 Mjx

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 01:44 AM

What if I toasted milk powder in a pan till golden and added that as well? So far the icecream is AMAZING. I just wonder how much further I can push it.


Toasting powdered milk adds a great flavour (I've done it when jury-rigging a replacement for condensed milk, when I'm in places whre it's unavailable), but it seems to make it less soluble (you see small, distinct tan flecks in the milk mixture); this may be because I've used powdered whole milk, and perhaps the toasting polymerizes the fat in it. I keep meaning to try this with skim milk powder, but haven't gotten around to it. If you try this, let me know how it goes.

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#314 pep.

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 03:31 AM

I'm making the adapted recipe from Cannelle et Vanille, but I had trouble "burning" the milk even on high heat. I used a large pot with with a relatively large diameter instead of a dedicated milk pot (as I don't have one). Was that the reason? Or did I stir too much? In the past, I've burnt milk accidentally several times, so I was flabbergasted that it didn't work this time.

In the end, I poured off most of the milk, then the residue turned brown quickly. Then I re-added the rest of the milk and let it simmer for a minute or two (probably not long enough to really get the flavor). I had added a vanilla pod before and in the finished ice mix, I can barely taste the burnt milk aroma, if at all.

#315 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 07:58 AM

Pep, when burning milk it's best to stir as little as possible, or to burn in small volume batches and blend these together at the end of the process. Personally, I'd never try with more than 1L of milk at a time, simply because larger volumes take forever to achieve that nice caramelized flavour.
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#316 pep.

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 08:29 AM

I did try with 0.9 liters (I added the rest after the milk had reduced by half without burning) :sad:

#317 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 08:43 AM

Hmmm. Very odd - I'm always able to burn milk or caramelize it in batches of 1L or less; it takes about an hour, and I stir maybe twice if I'm burning it. I don't have a dedicated milk pot, just a nice stainless steel one that's fairly easy to clean up afterwards. Maybe try adding a pinch of baking soda before you start the burn - that acts as a catalyst for the caramelization reaction.
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#318 pep.

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 08:59 AM

OK, maybe I was too hasty (it's certainly been less than an hour, maybe 30 minutes)? But I will try the baking soda next time.

#319 jrshaul

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 03:53 PM

A stroke of good luck at a garage sale brought me a like-new electric ice cream maker for all of $3. I proceeded to freeze the liner, throw in a mixture of 2.5 cups whole milk, 3 tablespoons cornstarch, 1/2 cup sugar, and a bit of maple syrup and corn syrup (it seemed sensible at the time) to test it, and it appears to be working flawlessly. It was a little bit grainy, but I chalk that up to not actually using any cream - it was, after all, a system test, and I didn't want to waste a pint of the good stuff on an appliance of unknown provenance.

I've never made ice cream before, though, and would be up to some idiotproofed suggestions. Especially those that involve apples (I have a temporary surplus), peaches (ditto), grapefruit (especially if it has campari in it,) and sour cream (don't ask.)

#320 KaffirLime

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 04:14 PM

Well if it was me and I wanted to make ice cream I'd throw out the apples, peaches, grapefruit, sour cream, cornstarch, sugar, maple syrup and corn syrup. I'd probably just start with some milk, eggs, cream and vanilla :wink:

#321 Chris Hennes

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 04:19 PM

Agreed (though I'd add some sugar, too).

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#322 rlibkind

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 04:31 PM

And since you appear into fruits, consider sorbets. Just remember to add a little corn syrup in addition to the sugar (regular Karo, for example, which is NOT a high fructose corn syrup) for its hydroscopic quality, I.e., helps to prevent big ice crystals. A tablespoon of alcohol (I like a complementary eau de vie, but vidka works) keeps it softer if you put it in the deep freeze because it lowers the freezing point. Running your fruit purées thru a chinoise or other fine mesh strainer helps, I think, make a more elegant sorbet; that's essential with fruits like blackberries.

A gelateria here in Philadelphia regularly makes a grapefruit-Campari sorbet that's popular. I'd use a couple extra tablespoons both because of its lower proof and because you like the flavor.

And a couple tablespoons of sour cream might turn it into an unusual sherbet.
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#323 weinoo

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 06:33 PM

Yep- I'd start by making a Philadelphia style vanilla ice cream. Sorbets are easy - and grapefruit Campari is indeed a favorite of mine... click.
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#324 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 06:46 PM

If you cooked the apples with cinnamon and pureed them, then mixed them with the sour cream, some brown sugar....might make an interesting frozen thing.

A fun mixture for an ice/granita is cantaloupe or honeydew melon (or similar) puree with a bit of anisette. Touch of lemon juice and sugar syrup to taste.

For some obscure reason I got rid of my little ice cream maker when we moved. Drat!

#325 lesliec

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 07:10 PM

The basic recipe I use was certainly stolen from somewhere, but I feel it's sufficiently generic that I don't feel guilty.

I've added all sorts of things to it - fresh ginger, cinnamon, vanilla, liquorice (not all at once, but there's a thought ...).

Start with 250ml of milk, another 250ml of cream and 150g of sugar. Add your chosen flavouring and bring just to the boil. Turn off the heat and let the mixture stand for an hour (or more) to infuse. Your taste will determine both how much flavour you add and how long you let it stand, which might mean you'll have to make a few batches before you're truly happy - for me, two or three cinnamon sticks, or one split vanilla pod, are about right.

Bring the cream/milk back up to a simmer. Whisk together six egg yolks. Study the Internet or ice cream-making books for advice on the art of tempering to avoid flavoured scrambled eggs (actually, do that before you start this part). Once the milk/cream/eggs are all in your pot together, keep stirring until the mixture coats the back of your spoon or spatula (run your finger over the back of the implement; if it leaves a distinct, persistent track, you're there), then strain the mixture into another 250ml of cream. Some recipes will tell you this should be sitting over a bowl of ice, but I don't bother. Mix all together and allow to cool before covering and putting in the fridge for several hours (overnight is good). Pour into your ice cream maker and churn until it's done (about 40 minutes in mine).

The only caveat about including Campari or other alcohols - your ice cream won't set as firmly.

Have fun. And consider making a pavlova with the spare egg whites.

Edited by lesliec, 15 July 2012 - 07:10 PM.

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#326 jrshaul

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 07:49 PM

I was actually thinking of sorbets with the fruit - I should'be been more specific. :P

First on the block is a sour cream ice cream, which is presently running through the ice cream machine. The recipe - adapted from an adaptation from the Momofuku cookbook - goes like this:

2 cups sour cream
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon sugar
zest and juice of of one organic midget lime. (if you buy from Trader Joe's, you know the ones I'm on about.)

Combine water and sugar and bring to a boil; once solution has boiled, remove from heat and immediately add lime zest while still hot. Allow to return to room temperature, add lime juice and sour cream. Pour in ice cream machine and hope for the best.

Up next is an apple sorbet, though it might be somewhat interesting to make - my scale recently bit the dust, and the recipe's in metric. Oy.

#327 pastrygirl

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 08:18 PM

Start with 250ml of milk, another 250ml of cream and 150g of sugar. Add your chosen flavouring and bring just to the boil.

Bring the cream/milk back up to a simmer. Whisk together six egg yolks. Study the Internet or ice cream-making books for advice on the art of tempering to avoid flavoured scrambled eggs (actually, do that before you start this part). Once the milk/cream/eggs are all in your pot together, keep stirring until the mixture coats the back of your spoon or spatula (run your finger over the back of the implement; if it leaves a distinct, persistent track, you're there), then strain the mixture into another 250ml of cream.


I always add the sugar to the egg yolks (be sure to whisk thoroughly, immediately, or they will get lumpy and weird). Then when I add the hot cream/milk to the sugar/yolk mixture, I never have a problem with it scrambling or needing to temper it slowly. Of course, you can still overcook your custard when it's back on the stove, but the only time I have scrambled yolks with hot liquid was when they were not mixed with the sugar first.

#328 jrshaul

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 09:05 PM

I was actually thinking of sorbets with the fruit. Herp derp.

First on the block is a sour cream recipe, which is going to go through the machine as soon as the liner is done freezing. The recipe - adapted from an adaptation from the Momofuku cookbook - goes like this:

2 cups sour cream
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon sugar
zest and juice of of one organic midget lime. (if you buy from Trader Joe's, you know the ones I'm on about.)

Combine water and sugar and bring to a boil; once solution has boiled, remove from heat and immediately add lime zest while still hot. Allow to return to room temperature, add lime juice and sour cream. Pour in ice cream machine and hope for the best.

Up next is an apple sorbet, though it might be somewhat interesting to make - my scale recently bit the dust, and the recipe is metric.

Oy. If anyone can suggest further information on the use of gelatin or other things to produce a softer sorbet, that would be splendid.

Edited by jrshaul, 15 July 2012 - 09:06 PM.


#329 Lisa Shock

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 09:24 PM

Apple sorbet is difficult because apples (and to a lesser extent pears) contain a fiber that when frozen is like straw in your mouth, very undesirable. This is why most recipes for it call for cooking the apples/pears -or using a commercially processed puree. You can juice them and get a decent result, but, you have to add vitamin C very quickly to avoid oxidation which can give you a dark brown sorbet. Also note that too much vitamin C, even .10gram can make the sorbet too tart.

Peaches are also difficult, there are threads around here on just this topic, in essence, peaches and apricots contain a chemical that makes them taste, at best, like chalk unless they are super-dead-mushy ripe, or cooked.

#330 Smithy

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 09:40 PM

I dunno, y'all may be way beyond my family's simple recipe, but we had many years' worth of what we thought was excellent peach ice cream using nothing more elaborate than peaches, eggs, lemon juice, sugar and a bit of milk or cream or half-and-half. I posted the recipe back in 2005. Here's the link: http://egullet.org/p1696659

Two caveats: first off, any leftovers will freeze very, very hard, and you have to let it soften to scoop it. I'm sure something like corn syrup could help that, but I haven't bothered to figure it out. Second, the recipe makes about double what will probably fit into your ice cream maker. Our hand-crank job called for 2 blender jars' worth of peaches, cut finely and packed in; that made about 3 quarts of ice cream. My ice cream maker makes about a quart, maybe 1-1/2 quarts. Cut the recipe as I posted it in half. Otherwise you'll get overflow pooching out the top of the ice cream maker, and you'll find yourself having to rescue it with a spoon. What a hardship. :wink:

The recipe allows for mixing of fruits, too: nectarines, peaches, plums, or a mixture all work well. You can see a photo of the process and my results here: http://egullet.org/p996048

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