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Sausage Making

Charcuterie

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144 replies to this topic

#121 Busboy

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 07:27 PM

It all depends on your own preferences, but I don't find butts give me the richness I prefer in my sausages. I find the trend towards lower-fat sausages unfortunate. I add about one part fatback for every four parts meat.
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#122 deltadoc

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 06:19 AM

I've been making Italian Hot Sausage for some 25 years, and 85% of the time I use a fatty pork butt, and the sausage comes out just fine. The other 15% of the time I use Pork Shoulder. Several butchers have told me that pork shoulder makes better sausage than pork butt, but I don't see a whole lot of difference.

doc

#123 Juanito

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 06:45 AM

No agreement, it seems. My suggestion would be to make two batches, one with added fat, and one without. Then you'll know.

FWIW, when I was making (Italian) sausage commercially, we ALWAYS added extra fat, and that was when pork was fattier than it is now, 20+ years ago. Makes for nice, juicy sausage. I would say the final ratio was 65 - 35, lean to fat. Of course, your mileage may vary, what with today's leaner pork and all.

#124 snowangel

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 07:45 AM

I've been making Italian Hot Sausage for some 25 years, and 85% of the time I use a fatty pork butt, and the sausage comes out just fine.  The other 15% of the time I use Pork Shoulder.  Several butchers have told me that pork shoulder makes better sausage than pork butt, but I don't see a whole lot of difference.

doc

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I always thought that a butt was just a boned shoulder. ???
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#125 Fat Guy

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 07:54 AM

My understanding is that both are from the forequarters of the pig, thus making the term butt a bit confusing (the cuts from the hindquarters are called leg, I think), but that what is colloquially known as butt is "shoulder butt" whereas what is colloquially known as shoulder is "picnic shoulder." The shoulder butt is above the picnic shoulder, as in closer to the back. Here's a chart indicating how the National Pork Producers Council names the cuts:

http://www.porkboard...es/porkcuts.pdf

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#126 woodburner

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 04:12 PM

The USDA currently limits the total fat content of fresh sausage to 50 percent, which is pretty freakin high in most people's world including mine.

Ground beef is graded to lean/fat content, ie: 80/20 for ground chuck.

What is puzzling, to me at least, is that there is no current limit to the fat content in store bought ground pork. I don't expect nor do I want, the federalies to watch over me, don't get me wrong, but what would be so radically wrong with listing the fat content on ground pork packages?

Or better yet, how can I test for the fat content, in my home?

woodburner

#127 coquus

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 09:33 AM

I have just been making some salami from Aidell's book, he says 80/20 for that. For fresh sausage, I believe, he recommends a slightly higher fat content, 70/30? And a pork butt is also a pork shoulder, and the acutal gluteus maximus belongs to the ham.

#128 daves

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Posted 24 November 2005 - 10:10 PM

I've done both straight pork butt as well as adding more fat -- depending on the sausage type and if I was smoking them or not. I've experimented with a few batches to figure out how fatty we like our sausage, so I agree with the poster above to make a batch with each to determine how you like your sausage.

#129 GordonCooks

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 05:42 AM

Get Ruhlman's new "Charcuterie" book - I'm halfway through and I'm becoming a sausage scientist.

#130 POLKEDOT

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 12:01 PM

When attached, picnic shoulder and pork butt are the front shoulder. The break is at the shoulder joint, putting the picnic lower on the pig, closest to the foot. The butt is attached to the loin. On a cow the "butt" would be called "chuck".

My experience in making sausage is the same as Juanito's. 65-35 lean to fat ratio, maybe even closer to 60-40. I would not expect 80-20 to have much flavor.

Side note, most people I made venison sausage for preferred almost 50% venison to 50% pork fat.
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#131 coquus

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Posted 09 December 2005 - 09:39 PM

I have a quick question about my first batch of salami. I don't suppose you have had the experience of the lactobacillus mold (white stuff) turning green. It should be almost done, some of them felt right, but I noticed today that in addition to the white stuff some of them had some mosy greenish mold growth. Have you had the experience of bad mold taking over or is this just another stage in the cycle of the good mold? Aidell's book says to wash off the green mold and re seed it with white mold, but I don't think he meant at this stage after it was already well seeded. I am hoping for a quick answer in case something is wrong, and there is something I can do about it.

#132 Ore

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 01:38 PM

In my opinion you can just brush off this green mold if you are at the ready to eat stage.

Then again, if the green mold is taking over and you see it in FULL EFFECT then there may be something wrong. I wouldn't worry about it too much if there is a small hint of green.

Let someone know before you try your salami...just to be safe (j/k!)

How about a photo?

#133 jmolinari

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 01:51 PM

What happened to the replies I and Ruhlman posted to Coquus' question?

#134 davebr

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 08:04 PM

Put in curing chamber set at about 52 deg. F and 75%
humidity.
after about 4 or 5 weeks the meat should have lost
about 35% of its weight (weight from after cure).

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I am at the point that my coppe need to hang(I used the Rhulman book recipe,,,kinda). I dont have a curing chamber. How bad is it for me to put it in the walk-in? Is a curing chamber something Im gonna have to drop a few dimes on?
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#135 davebr

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 08:10 PM

  I came back to the US (Los Angeles area) yesterday and I am in the process of searching for quality Pork and the works for a small salumi biznes!

Some pics are on the blog.

Ore

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Did you ever start your salumi biz in LA?
Gorganzola, Provolone, Don't even get me started on this microphone.---MCA Beastie Boys

#136 Tri2Cook

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 04:44 AM

Digging this one up to ask a question from the department of cheapness. In a fit of excitement, when I got a meat grinder for Christmas last year, I ordered an overabundance of sausage making supplies. Now, almost 11 months later, I have two remaining unopened, constantly refrigerated packages of hog casings. Since they don't smell like sunshine and roses when brand-new, how do I know if they're still okay to use? I ordered a few more supplies over the weekend including some more casings (I'm giving the tubed version a try this time despite the higher cost) but, in the interest of waste not, want not, I'll use up the other casings first if they're still safe.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#137 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 05:16 AM

Salt-packed casings remain safe to use indefinitely but quality tapers off with age. If they're good quality casings, they should retain their quality for at least 4-5 years.


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#138 Tri2Cook

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 10:57 AM

Sounds good to me. Thanks!


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#139 Tri2Cook

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 04:13 PM

Got some 105 mm x 61 cm fibrous casings today. I think I'm going to try making bologna and mortadella. Also got about 160' of shirred cellulose casing. Gonna give skinless hotdogs a try.


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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#140 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 04:36 PM

Sounds like you're going to be busy.  :smile:


~Martin
 
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#141 Tri2Cook

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 04:50 PM

Not sure if I should ask this here or in a sous vide thread but I'm gonna go with here. If I want to cook a bologna sous vide, does it have to be bagged in addition to the fibrous casing (the casings I bought are listed as "for water cooking")? I've seen things cooked directly in the bath without bagging but I always assumed it probably wasn't the best idea. I'm thinking sous vide would be the easiest way to keep from going too high with the temp but bagging it would have to be a delicate procedure to keep from crushing it while still uncooked. Maybe just use a big ziplock and the dunk-it-in-water-to-remove-air method?


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#142 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 05:44 PM

I definitely recommend bagging it.

 

However, there are high-barrier casings that are safe to just toss in the bath without bagging.......

 

http://www.sausagema...iercasings.aspx


~Martin
 
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#143 Tri2Cook

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 06:03 PM

I'm using these. They're listed as "for water cooking and head cheese". I'm fine with bagging though, just thought I'd ask in case it was unnecessary.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#144 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 06:12 PM

I don't have experience with those particular casings, but some fibrous casings that can be cooked in water will still leach some.


~Martin
 
Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist and contrarian who questions everything!
 


#145 Willie

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 10:26 AM

bear sausage.jpg This is a great thread! I recently made about 10 pounds of bear sausage for a client. Basically it's an Italian style sausage with fennel, coriander, fresh garlic, granulated onion, pepper, salt, dad's daily red wine, and fresh parsley. This was a young bear who had been gorging on huckleberries for the last month prior to harvesting. I'm amazed how much talent is out there in the charcuterie arts on this site.







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