Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

eGfoodblog: markemorse

Foodblog

  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
250 replies to this topic

#241 miladyinsanity

miladyinsanity
  • participating member
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Manchester, UK

Posted 06 August 2007 - 02:19 AM

And this was somewhere between an unripe pear and jicama or chayote:

Posted Image

I'm not that either were actually enjoyable to eat, but the novelty made for good discussion.

View Post

Rose Apple. The good ones are very sweet, crunchy and juicy on their own, but I like them better dusted with sour plum powder.
May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

#242 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 06 August 2007 - 02:23 AM

And this was somewhere between an unripe pear and jicama or chayote:

Posted Image

I'm not that either were actually enjoyable to eat, but the novelty made for good discussion.

View Post

Rose Apple. The good ones are very sweet, crunchy and juicy on their own, but I like them better dusted with sour plum powder.

View Post

Ah, May...thanks again. This one was really only juicy and sweet near its fat bottom, the rest was...very jicama-like.

#243 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 06 August 2007 - 04:11 AM

Has the Mexican version of this dish -- tacos al pastor -- made it to Europe yet?

View Post

My least favorite thing about Amsterdam: no Mexican food. Well, one real Mexican restaurant run by Mexicans. There are plenty of places that say they serve "Mexican food", but it's basically food by people who have seen pictures of Mexican food but never tasted it.

Edited by markemorse, 06 August 2007 - 04:23 AM.


#244 Shelby

Shelby
  • society donor
  • 2,458 posts

Posted 06 August 2007 - 05:23 AM

Mark,

Just wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed reading! Your world is very different than mine--very interesting.

I hope your lady is feeling better today!

#245 sharonb

sharonb
  • participating member
  • 187 posts
  • Location:Paris

Posted 06 August 2007 - 05:44 AM

My least favorite thing about Amsterdam: no Mexican food. Well, one real Mexican restaurant run by Mexicans. There are plenty of places that say they serve "Mexican food", but it's basically food by people who have seen pictures of Mexican food but never tasted it.

View Post


Sounds like the Mexican food I make. In a complete vaccuum (and I'm not talking about sous-vide). I should have eaten some before I left the U.S. ...

#246 Marneuse

Marneuse
  • participating member
  • 17 posts
  • Location:Near Greensboro, NC

Posted 06 August 2007 - 05:55 AM

Hey Mark!

I'm new to eGullet but the blogs are one of the things that drew me in. Thank you so much for the time it took for you to share your corner of the world--and some very unfamiliar food to me!

Marsha

#247 patti

patti
  • participating member
  • 616 posts
  • Location:Louisiana

Posted 06 August 2007 - 05:58 AM

I don't post much these days, but I couldn't let your blog close without saying how much I enjoyed every minute of it. Thanks for a fascinating week!

Best wishes for a speedy recovery for Mara.
"I like 'em french fried pertaters." (Billy Bob Thornton as Karl, in Sling Blade.)

#248 yunnermeier

yunnermeier
  • participating member
  • 326 posts

Posted 06 August 2007 - 07:26 AM

Haven't been here for ages so I only just came across your excellent blog, markemorse!

Kaya is very easy to make but requires patience, fresh ingredients and constant attention (a bit like making Megan's Gateaux aux Crepes. Easy in technique but the minute you get distracted, you get burnt crepes oops).

This is my mother's recipe for kaya:

Kaya Nyonya

Ingredients:

10 small eggs
500 g granulated sugar
Pati santan from 1.5 coconut
4 pandan leaves

Mix the eggs and sugar in a pot and stir over boiling water using a medium low heat until sugar melts. Sieve the mixture into a round stainless steel or enamel pot, add in the santan and pandan leaves.and stir over boiling water (double boil), of and on, until the mixture turns quite thick. Discard the pandan leaves. Cover the pot and steam over very low heat for about 3 hours.

#249 hsm

hsm
  • participating member
  • 315 posts

Posted 06 August 2007 - 07:42 AM

Thank you for a fun, entertaining and inspiring week, Mark. The food looked fantastic and it was a treat to see your town. I'm getting my jar of sambal olek some other sambal company soon. :wub:

Best wishes for you and Mara.

#250 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 06 August 2007 - 08:18 AM

Thank you for a fun, entertaining and inspiring week, Mark. The food looked fantastic and it was a treat to see your town.  I'm getting my jar of sambal olek some other sambal company soon. :wub:

Best wishes for you and Mara.

View Post

Thanks very much to you all for the well-wishing (and to yunnermeier for the kaya recipe!), she's doing better today, everything seems to be returning to normal (knock on wood)...and hsm, Mara really likes your avatar! :wub:

#251 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 06 August 2007 - 08:46 AM

What are your thoughts on Dutch food (though you do make an interesting point that the Dutch themselves have widely adopted this immigrant cooking)?

View Post

Wanted to say a quick word on this...
Dutch food is undergoing a transformation at the moment. The primary influences are probably Spanish, but there is sort of a new appreciation for quality ingredients it seems. Or at least Ahold is trying to foster this consumer desire so that shoppers will pay 4 euro for ham instead of 2 euros. Anyway, it'll be interesting to see what happens with this...now that I'm talking about it there's actually quite a bit to say about the laid-back approach most non-foodie Dutch people have toward cooking and serving meals.

But we'll save that for another time I guess. As for traditional Dutch food, I loooove the baked goods, I'm a marzipan freak. I also love worst, so there's that. The dairy products are fantastic here, not just the cheese, but things like yoghurt for example will just blow the bells off of comparable products from elsewhere. I eat a ton of fish, and they really know how to fry fish here: with almost nothing on it. I'm sure I'm forgetting hundreds of things...but, there's always next time for that. :smile:

+++

And OK, from the Department of Potential Synchronicity, y'all remember this Pringles can:

Posted Image

Look a little closer, I'm not making this up (above the 170g text):

Posted Image

We didn't notice until after the can had been sitting around for a few days...
see? this was all destiny, dirty dirty destiny.

+++

Later taters...thanks for reading,
mark

Edited by markemorse, 06 August 2007 - 08:53 AM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Foodblog