Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

eGfoodblog: markemorse

Foodblog

  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
250 replies to this topic

#61 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:10 AM

This is fascinating; so close to my adopted country, yet so drastically different (except the cheeses!).

One question again about the term "keuken" - is it possible it's like the French word "cuisine" which means both "kitchen" and "cooking"? (I.e. "J'installe une nouvelle cuisine" and "J'aime la cuisine chinoise"?)

View Post

Hey Sharon, I think that's pretty correct, or at least that's my understanding of it. Maybe Chufi can confirm or deny.

#62 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:16 AM

This is fascinating; so close to my adopted country, yet so drastically different (except the cheeses!).

One question again about the term "keuken" - is it possible it's like the French word "cuisine" which means both "kitchen" and "cooking"? (I.e. "J'installe une nouvelle cuisine" and "J'aime la cuisine chinoise"?)

View Post

Hey Sharon, I think that's pretty correct, or at least that's my understanding of it. Maybe Chufi can confirm or deny.

View Post


I can confirm this.

#63 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 05:49 AM

OK, sleep achieved!
Time to start thinking about food.

+++

In the meantime, here are the requisite pet photos. We have two calico sisters, Macka (pronounced Motch-ka, it's Croatian for "cat"), and Jo3n. Here are their baby pictures:

Macka:

Posted Image

Jo3n:

Posted Image

Such pensive fuzz bombs. We'll check out their grownup pictures after lunch.

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 06:39 AM.


#64 Shelby

Shelby
  • society donor
  • 2,372 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 06:02 AM

OK, sleep achieved!
Time to start thinking about food.

View Post



I vote for the catfish.

#65 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 06:29 AM

Catfish is defrosting, looking more and more like dinner instead of lunch.
Mara has returned, and she came bearing sandwich fixins from the Turkish guys:

Posted Image

#66 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 06:36 AM

I guess that means basically tomatoes and fresh bread.

Posted Image

But she makes a really exceptional tomato sandwich, and from her I've learned that there are three things that can make it great even if your tomatoes are not worldbeating:

And those things are:

A healthy dose of good mayo....

Posted Image

Posted Image

salt on your tomatoes...

Posted Image

and a significant amount of freshly cracked pepper.

Posted Image

+++

Posted Image

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 06:42 AM.


#67 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 06:46 AM

A change of plans may be afoot: some friends who are out of town for the summer had a vacation renter who bailed on them and now they need someone to feed their cats. Since it's on the other side of town and not incredibly convenient to pop in a couple times a day, one of us may go live over there for a couple days, they've got an amazing LP collection and it's a nice apartment...I'll decide by tonight or so.

Nonetheless, catfish for dinner after I run some errands.

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 06:57 AM.


#68 MarketStEl

MarketStEl
  • participating member
  • 3,722 posts
  • Location:Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

Posted 31 July 2007 - 06:49 AM

Since you've been doing a bang-up job with the educational part of your blog, and with answering questions, I'm going to guess you simply didn't see this one in my last post:

Isn't ketjap the sauce that mutated into what we Anglo-Americans call ketchup? My recollection is that the original sauce is thinner than the thick seasoned tomato sauce we eat. Is this sauce also made from tomatoes?


Also, is this sauce Indian or Indonesian in origin? (I think it originated in one of those two places.)

Since you prepared a tomato sandwich immediately upthread, I'd like to turn you on to a little twist I recently discovered that I think you might like.

One evening on the way home from work (via 69th Street Terminal), I stopped in the H-Mart in Upper Darby to pick up some veggies and ended up buying a container of store-made Korean chili sauce on impulse. The easiest way to describe the Korean variety is as what Vietnamese sriracha might taste like if a touch of corn syrup (as found in American "chili sauce") were added to it. I found the combination of sweetness and heat appealing.

In the course of trying to figure out things to do with it, I mixed in a little of this (about a teaspoon) with about a half cup of Hellmann's canola mayonnaise.

The whole of this condiment is definitely greater than the sum of its parts. You can easily vary the spiciness by adjusting the chili sauce-to-mayo ratio. It's great on fresh, ripe Jersey or Lancaster County tomatoes, and I can't imagine it would be any less delicious on the varieties available in the Netherlands. Given Amsterdam's modern-day polyglot population, I can't imagine your not being able to find Korean chili sauce somewhere in your vicinity.

Next time, I plan on making my own mayo with this mixed in.
Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen
My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

#69 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 06:51 AM

Hey Sandy, I did see your ketjap question, AND answer it, but it was lost in The Great Post Loss when I inadvertently closed my browser this morning. I'll definitely re-answer it at some point (because it's important), hopefully tonight!

The short answer is yes, ketchup came from ketjap....but it's a pretty long answer, done right...

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 02:37 PM.


#70 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 07:06 AM

Posted Image

I mentioned EuroShopper mayonnaise during my fridge excavation...it's really my favorite store-bought mayo of all time. I used to be a Hellman's man, but I really can't eat it anymore, the kind of airy texture freaks me out and I don't love the taste of their soybean oil. EuroShopper has a tad more vinegar and a bit of sugar and also lists mustard as an ingredient. Don't know why it works so well for us, but it does.

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 07:07 AM.


#71 dividend

dividend
  • participating member
  • 351 posts

Posted 31 July 2007 - 07:45 AM

our apartment, bed upstairs where I am typing this from:

Posted Image

the rest of our apartment:

Posted Image

View Post


I'm in love with your living space. Minimalism like that is incredibly appealing. It forces you to be selective in accumulation of stuff that inevitably ends up as junk. Doubly so in the kitchen.

some (ahem) KC Masterpiece BBQ sauce my mom sent me (forgive her);

View Post


I'm trying to get off my BBQ soapbox from last week, but let me know if you want me to send you something better from Kansas City.
"Nothing you could cook will ever be as good as the $2.99 all-you-can-eat pizza buffet." - my EX (wonder why he's an ex?)
My eGfoodblog: My corner of the Midwest

#72 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 08:48 AM

Well, dang, it's a bee-youtiful day outside and I would love to traipse around taking gratuitous food porn photos for you guys but I've got to go track down this inconsiderate boob so I can pick up some apartment keys. Hopefully I'll get to make dinner at some point.

#73 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,307 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 31 July 2007 - 09:06 AM

Markemorse,

Your incredible blog is right up there with Chufi's! I learned quite a lot from her about Amsterdam before visiting in the spring; unfortunately, I wasn't there long enough to be adventurous food wise.

I am learning about a whole different world of food reading through your week here. So fascinating to see the blend of cuisine from the colonies. We hope to be within reach of Amsterdam again next spring. I will be more prepared to venture into the foods you and Chufi have introduced.

As for the "fo lam" - you said spit roasted pigglet. I'm wondering if it's the same as siu yook where the skin is blistered and crisp? Typically, the seasoning is nam yeu (fermented tofu), brown bean paste, 5-spice, etc. I can see where that would be perfect in a crispy roll with its layers of fat and lean.
Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#74 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 10:46 AM

Markemorse,

Your incredible blog is right up there with Chufi's!


Now you're talking crazy. :raz:
Thanks for saying so, though....

+++

I'll return to action here in an hour or so...tonight's dinner was the slowest, most exhausting and inefficient "quick dinner" of all time. I'm not used to taking pictures while cooking, and I just don't know how y'all do it (and cook at the same time). I was a mess...I may have to switch back to takeout for the rest of the week.

+++

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 10:47 AM.


#75 chocomoo

chocomoo
  • participating member
  • 399 posts
  • Location:Vancouver, BC

Posted 31 July 2007 - 10:51 AM

Yep, "fo lam" is the same as "siu yook". "Fo" as in fire, or roasted; "lam" as in belly. As far as I know though, "fo lam"/"siu yook" is not piglet - that would be "yue jue" (suckling pig), which is usually only eaten during special occasions.

markemorse, we have quite a few jars of Lee Kum Kee sauces in our house too. The cha siu sauce is pretty good, and we like those one-time-use packets of tomato garlic prawns too. And of course we have the oyster sauce (2 different grades - normal & premium, but I can't tell the difference).

Continuing the topic of Chinese condiments, I've never seen mention of thick soy sauce here on eGullet. From Wikipedia:

Thick soy sauce ("Jiàngyóugāo", 醬油膏 or 蔭油膏): Dark soy sauce that has been thickened with starch and sugar. It is also occasionally flavored with MSG. This sauce is not usually used directly in cooking but more often as a dipping sauce or poured on food as a flavorful addition.

We use a brand that's made in Taiwan, but I don't remember the name right now. We do use it to cook certain things, and also as a dipping sauce for hot pot items.

#76 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 11:58 AM

Well thank you very much chocomoo and Dejah, for clearing up the fo lam business. I'm not 100% sure there was actually any on my sandwich, it seemed like mostly char siu with a little bit of duck. But an echte moksi meti should have fo lam.

+++

OK, while I spend some time uploading and resizing images, let's play that foodblog game where I show you a picture and you guess what it is:

Posted Image

Go!

+++

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 11:59 AM.


#77 johnnyd

johnnyd
  • participating member
  • 2,322 posts
  • Location:Portland, ME

Posted 31 July 2007 - 12:09 PM

It's a slice of B&M's Famous Brown Bread! Amazing how many corners of the planet it seems to turn up! :biggrin:
"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II
Portland Food Map.com

#78 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 12:13 PM

It's a slice of B&M's Famous Brown Bread! Amazing how many corners of the planet it seems to turn up! :biggrin:

View Post

Wow, truly remarkable resemblance, but no!!!
Note the wooden "crust" on this non-bread....

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 12:16 PM.


#79 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 12:45 PM

OK, so this afternoon when I woke up I had to go run some errands, as I mentioned. I went out into the back courtyard where we keep our bikes:

Posted Image

and to my surprise and pleasure, it was a beautiful day, as I've also mentioned. We've had about 4 beautiful days thus far this summer, so this was good good news.

I rode up to our shopping street, the Haarlemmerstraat, it's about 2 minutes away. I didn't have time to take the scenic route, but here's where I parked my bike:

Posted Image

First stop was my favorite nearby bakery, a Moroccan place called Mediterranee:

Posted Image

but when I popped my head in the door I could see that they were pretty well picked over (it was 4:30pm or so, they close at 6pm).

Posted Image

I'll be sure to stop in earlier in the day later this week....I normally get one of two things here: a harcha, a grilled semolina cake that is kind of a cross between cornbread and an English muffin; or a tuna brik, spicy tuna and eggs in pastry. Today I got neither.

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 12:48 PM.


#80 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 12:57 PM

Thus, I went next door to Tampopo. I have complex feelings about Tampopo. They are essentially a very comprehensive pan-Asian toko, which is a good thing to be. They are also excruciatingly expensive, which is less good.

Posted Image

I try to see their side of it, but having just lived in Chinatown for 3 years, I know that these products don't have to be anywhere near this expensive. And having just closed a retail business here myself, I'm pretty in touch with their other costs. I'm sure they've got a terrifically high rent, this street has recently become rather trendy....but they've indulged in lots of costly branded packaging and fixtures, the costs of which I'm sure have been passed on to me, the shopper.

So what I'm saying is I don't shop here very often, but sometimes...when I try to dart quickly past, I can hear the unexplored condiments calling to me in their spicy little irresistable exotic voices...and I yield to temptation, and enter the dragon.

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 01:47 PM.


#81 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 01:04 PM

Once inside, I grab a customized Tampopo shopping basket ($$$) and typically head for either the heavily Lee Kum Kee-weighted Chinese section:

Posted Image

top row: oyster sauce; sweet and sour sauce; chili oil; sesame oil; "vegetarian stir fry sauce", whatever that is; chive oil.

middle row: black bean garlic sauce; chili sauce; spare rib sauce; char siu sauce...and I think you can read the rest.

+++

or the Indonesian section:

Posted Image

Yes, these are rows and rows of different varieties of the sambals I had in my fridge.

Top row, left to right: orgeade syrup; pangsit sauce; chili sauce; ketjap manis.

Sambal row: assem; extra hot badjak; djeroek; gandaria; kemirie; manis; nasi goreng; oelek; peteh.

The next row down is Indonesian curry pastes.

The row below that is dried shrimp, atjar tjampoer, creamed coconut, and other miscellany.

+++

The above photo is obviously worth elaborating on, but I'm a bit behind schedule as it is...I'll see if I can add a dollop of clarity after I catch up a bit. Here's a closeup:

Posted Image

+++

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 01:48 PM.


#82 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 01:08 PM

And I usually pick up something from the drink fridge:

Posted Image

I'm in love with the soy cappucino in the middle of the top row.

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 01:14 PM.


#83 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 01:37 PM

There's also a freezer section that is especially expensive, and I have yet to buy anything out of it:

Posted Image

And a nice Japanese section:

Posted Image

...as well as Indian and Thai sections that I don't spend too much time in because other stores do it better. But basically, if you're looking for something, they've probably got it, but they know that, and you'll pay for it.

I'll show you my booty in a minute (tee hee!)

+++

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 01:46 PM.


#84 Chufi

Chufi
  • participating member
  • 3,117 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 01:43 PM

I completely agree about Tampopo. I have mixed feelings about it too. Mostly I prefer other shops where stuff is cheaper, but sometimes it's hard to resist because it's glossy and shiny and no dust on the shelves and you don't feel compelled to check the use by date on every jar like I do in some of the more 'authentic' toko´s :laugh:

btw what´s the Dutch word for catfish?

#85 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 01:45 PM

Posted Image

This sign will be the bane of my existence this week. Basically: "we're closed for vacation". This was my poultry guy, I stopped by to get some smoked duck, duck confit, etc. But I was de-nied.

+++

So I headed home, but ran into an Amsterdam traffic jam a block from my apartment:

Posted Image

+++

#86 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:10 PM

Here's what I brought back from Tampopo...this stuff was not expensive at all, I was out of there for less than 5 bucks I think...

Coconut vinegar:

Posted Image

Palm sugar:

Posted Image

And a delicious new find, the ingredients are coconut milk, eggs, and sugar:

Posted Image

It tastes like coconut dulce de leche. Anyone familiar with this gooey goodness?

+++

New ingredients in hand, I decided to try a leetle experiment, and it actually came out pretty wonderful:

Posted Image

It's a shrimp escabeche in a coconut-palm sugar vinaigrette with basil, scallions, and a peanut, coriander, and toasted coconut sprinkle on top. It was really tasty...it may actually have tasted better than it looks. I'll post the full recipe soon.

Posted Image

+++

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 08:50 PM.


#87 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:19 PM

OK, looks like I'm not going to get my full dinner pics up tonight. Um...nobody told me that this foodblogging was hard work! Did they? I'll put the catfish saga up in the morning, and get to the lingering questions then as well. Thanks to all for your attention and your warm fuzzies....

We hereby bid you nighty-nite...(that's our place directly above the tree)

+++

Posted Image

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 02:25 PM.


#88 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 02:22 PM

btw what´s the Dutch word for catfish?

View Post

We use frozen Pangasius filet, or pangafilet as it's frequently called here. The ones we get are Vietnamese as far as I understand.

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 08:33 PM.


#89 miladyinsanity

miladyinsanity
  • participating member
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Manchester, UK

Posted 31 July 2007 - 03:10 PM

And a delicious new find, the ingredients are coconut milk, eggs, and sugar:

Posted Image

It tastes like coconut dulce de leche. Anyone familiar with this gooey goodness?

View Post

It's not terribly hard to make if you have fresh coconut milk, eggs, sugar and a double boiler--plus a few hours of stirring.

There's another, less time-consuming method, whereby you mix up the ingredients, then steam the entire pot, but my mom the expert says that you'll get a lumpy texture that way.

You can make pandan and caramel variations. Yours is brown, so it's the latter.
May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

#90 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 31 July 2007 - 03:24 PM

And a delicious new find, the ingredients are coconut milk, eggs, and sugar:

Posted Image

It tastes like coconut dulce de leche. Anyone familiar with this gooey goodness?

View Post

It's not terribly hard to make if you have fresh coconut milk, eggs, sugar and a double boiler--plus a few hours of stirring.

There's another, less time-consuming method, whereby you mix up the ingredients, then steam the entire pot, but my mom the expert says that you'll get a lumpy texture that way.

You can make pandan and caramel variations. Yours is brown, so it's the latter.

View Post


Great, May...I knew that the Singapore/Malaysia contingent would be all over this. Any chance you've got a full recipe laying about that you can share? For the uninitiated, I'll post some very porny fotos of it tomorrow.

G'night...

Edited by markemorse, 31 July 2007 - 08:36 PM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Foodblog