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167 replies to this topic

#151 heidih

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 05:29 PM

I "foraged" in the yard today for nasturtium seed pods. The first image is about a cup of the pods along with the debris of stems and petals. The second image is of the pods in a salt and water brine set to soak uncovered for a day. Will resoak again depending on how sharp the bite is versus the flavor tomorrow. Then they will get a hot vinegar bath with a touch of sugar. Anybody else pickle these? They are compared to capers. I love them in a caponata when the eggplant and tomatoes are at their peak. Of course they lend a unique accent in the same applications as capers in so many dishes.

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#152 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 08:25 PM

Heidi- My grand-mother used to pickle them. Similar to capers, with more crunch.

#153 Mallet

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 11:48 AM

Yajna, can you talk a bit more about making vin de pêche? It sounds great (and my parents have a peach tree!)
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#154 Yajna Patni

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 08:48 AM

I used the recipe on David Leibovitz.com.. it was a bottle of red wine, with about 40 peach leaves soaked in it for a week. Then you add sugar and some brandy. You drink it as an apperitf over ice, and it was so good!

#155 Tri2Cook

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 12:26 PM

Went out scouting, the blueberries are starting. Early for here and it looks like it's going to be a good year. I'd say another week and they'll really be jumping.
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#156 Kerry Beal

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 01:58 PM

Went out scouting, the blueberries are starting. Early for here and it looks like it's going to be a good year. I'd say another week and they'll really be jumping.


I bought blueberries from the side of the road a couple of days ago - saw a whole lot of people selling them on the way to Sudbury yesterday. Must be a really good year here.

#157 Tri2Cook

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 03:01 PM


Went out scouting, the blueberries are starting. Early for here and it looks like it's going to be a good year. I'd say another week and they'll really be jumping.


I bought blueberries from the side of the road a couple of days ago - saw a whole lot of people selling them on the way to Sudbury yesterday. Must be a really good year here.


I hope so. I hate those years when you have to plod around in the heat and bugs for 2 hours or more to get one bucket.
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#158 Mallet

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 10:47 AM



Is this early for Ontario? Last year I was picking blueberries in NB in the first week of August and I was still about a 1-2 weeks too early.

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#159 Tri2Cook

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 03:27 AM

It's a little early for the part of Ontario where I live assuming I'm not wrong and can start the serious picking within the next week.
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#160 Mallet

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 10:01 AM

A came upon a good quantity of lobster mushrooms. Although they are not uncommon, it's very rare for me to get at them before the slugs do, so I've never picked them before. I fried up a few in butter and they were pretty good, but not particularly distinctive. Any favourite preparations?

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#161 Mallet

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 04:03 AM

We ended up making a mushroom risotto with the lobsters, which was pretty tasty. The mushrooms themselves are fairly mild but have a nice firm texture. This time of the year, I've moved on to better fodder.

Chicken of the woods
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Also, while we were out we saw several giant swallowtail caterpillars on a prickly ash bush. Normally they just look like bird droppings but when you touch them they rear up a snake-like osmeterium, which apparently releases some pretty foul odour.

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#162 Darienne

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 11:11 AM

No apples for us this year, after last year's amazing bounty. However, a bumper crop of wild grapes...more than I can use. Grape jelly is the result.

Out on our perimeter walk this morning, we saw several puffballs, still small, and we'll watch them for picking this coming week. Ed loves puffball fried in butter. I freeze the extra for a variety of mushroom uses during the year.
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#163 Tri2Cook

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 04:51 PM

Blueberries and chanterelles are nuts this year. I've been using chanterelles like the lady in the Frank's commercial uses the hot sauce... I put that *bleep* in everything.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#164 Darienne

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 05:27 PM

It's still too early for picking, of course, but this is going to be another fantastic apple year.  Our farm has apple trees all over it. 

 

Oh, it's not an apple farm...they escaped from the first houses built here.  We are a hemp farm.


Edited by Darienne, 06 August 2013 - 05:28 PM.

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Darienne


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#165 Baselerd

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 07:20 AM

Apparently elderberries grow around my area (central Texas), but I don't trust myself to forage correctly. Add that to the fact that the inedible parts of the plant are poisonous...



#166 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 09:56 AM

After a few hikes that left me empty-handed expect for some wild sage, I finally found elderflowers and made a syrup/cordial. It's the end of the season though, and most of the elders are no longer in bloom. I will try to come back in a few weeks for the berries.

 

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#167 heidih

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:39 PM

We are getting heat now so the wild fennel will be finishing in the canyons. I keep reading about the loveliness of fennel pollen. Is this captured from the wild variety or from the domesticated garden one? Have any of you collected it, and do you have tips?



#168 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:59 PM

Heidi - I was in a restaurant in Santa Barbara recently and they had just picked a few wild fennel flowers (the smallest flowers) and sprinkled them on a cucumber soup I believe. I thought that was a great idea. It was pretty and delicious.