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eGfoodblog: Dave Hatfield

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#31 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 04:12 AM

I'm really looking forward to your Country Apricot Tart recipe - there are some great French apricots available at the market here in Tallinn at the moment, and I'm keen to try a nice French tart with them.

And I'm not envious at all that you get to eat all those cep mushrooms. I've been eating lots of fresh yellow chantarelle mushrooms during the last few days, and the wild mushroom season lasts until late autumn, so I'm all fine :rolleyes:

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Hope you like the recipe. I can tell you that I got it many years ago from an article by Jacques Pepin. It works equally well with purple plums, peaches or nectarines.

We too are getting chanterelles, yummy. The cepes were a surprise as they were so early.

#32 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 04:15 AM

This should be a fun blog.  We spent a very few days in Paris recently, which had me really wanting to see the rest of France. 

As for your mystery item, it looks like some sort of clamp, but food wise, the first two things that come to mind is either an egg ring, or an english muffin ring.  I'd use it to make meat pies. :biggrin:

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Its hard to go wrong anywhere in France even though we favor our little corner.

You are right about the intended use being to clamp something. I like your food ideas, but they're not the use I have in mind.

#33 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 04:25 AM

intended use: drainpipe holder

unintended use hanger for sausages? sorry im one track minded on this. if anyone saw my post in the kitchen consumer forum im trying to create the right chamber for drying sausages... ill be seeing them in my sleep next.

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Mather! You got it! The intended use is indeed as a drainpipe holder.

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Here's one on our house.

However, you're nowhere close on the food use. I sympathize with your sausage drying problem, but I don't think this is the answer. Sorry!

#34 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 04:44 AM

Ready for breakfast? Anyone who has spent much time in France will recognize what follows.

As I mentioned last night we fogies get together on Tuesday mornings for breakfast and to shoot the breeze. The was a lot of discussion this morning about why French wedding dinners take so long. (One of the guys had just been to one where aperitifs started at 6:00PM, they sat down at 9:30PM and he & his wife left at 1:15 AM after the main course, but before cheese, dessert or coffee.) We also had a long discussion about where to go this year to watch the Tour de France. The easy part was settling upon Mazamet. The hard part is choosing the restaurant for lunch afterwards. I got the restaurant assignment.

Not much more to say so here are some pictures just to make you drool a little bit.

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Here's the table.

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Croissants, pain au raison & torsacle. Note 2 different types of croissant; nature & beurre. Buy the beurre they're much richer!

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The bread from the local shop.

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Coffee.

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Jams. All home made by friends.

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Close up of pain au raison and Torsacle.

Alan's turn next week.

#35 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 06:04 AM

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We're visiting Najac.

Najac is about 10 miles from where we live and as you see is an exceptionally pretty village. The drive over to Najac is equally nice as you pass through some very nice farmland sprinkled with cows, pass a duck farm with all of the foie gras on the hoof so to speak and go along a ridge with beautiful views to either side. You can make out the Averyron Gorge all the way from Villefranche to St Antonin. There are some favorite hiking paths around here.
You come down off the ridge passing a small well proportioned château until you reach & cross the river Averyron. Before you cross there is a nice Hotel Restaurant down a small lane (although John Whiting of French forum fame tells me that the restaurant has gone off!) Now you go up & up the hill to the village, the church and the château. 3/4 of the way up is our favorite pizzeria which does both Italian & French food. Cheap & cheerful!
At the top is the village.

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The village has a hotel/ restaurant (Bib Gourmand) and three cafes that serve food. There is an excellent pâtisserie as well as a general store. A favorite pass time for visitors is to look at the houses for sale in the windows of the Notaire and the Real Estate Agent. We can all dream can't we.

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The view down the hill.

Nothing fancy here, not very touristy but a very nice place to visit.

If you have the legs for it you can walk up to & around the château.

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The views are worth it!

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#36 Kouign Aman

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 07:30 AM

Oh that breakfast! It brings back excellent and hungry-making memories.
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#37 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 08:48 AM

Before I forget here's the fridge photo.

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Nothing too dramatic. You can just see the magrets that I'm cooking for dinner near the bottom.

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Lurking at the back are my two jars of duck fat. Couldn't cook properly here without them. Fortunately duck fat seems to keep for a long time in the fridge.

I'm going to post the Apricot tart recipe next as I've now finished making it>

#38 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 09:11 AM

Here's the Apricot Tart recipe with some pictures.

These rustic fruit tarts are easy to make and are especially good as we move through the summer and fully tree ripened fruits are progressively available. I’ve started with an Apricot tart because they are what is at their peak right now. In a few weeks it will be peaches, then plums and onto fall with pears. The technique of making the tart is the same no matter which fruit you choose to use.

Here goes: (pre-heat you oven to 190 degrees C.)

This pie is made on a cookie sheet or in my case a big round pizza sheet. Use whatever you have that suits and is large enough to contain the size of pie you want to make. For example my pizza sheet is about 10 inches (25 cm) in diameter.

Here's the mise en place:

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1) First make your pate brisée in the normal way. Make enough to cover the bottom of your container PLUS about 2 inches all around when rolled out thinly.

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2) Cut the apricots in half & take out the seeds.

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3) Mix some flour, sugar & the ground almonds in equal quantities. Make about 11/2 cup; more if your apricots are very ripe & will give off lots of juice. ( NOTE: I like my fruit tarts to be tart. If you like more sweetness then add more sugar to the mixture or you can sprinkle on sugar after you have assembled the tart.)

4) Roll out the pate brisée into a round or rectangle (depending upon the container you are using) the size of your pie PLUS about 2 inches all around.

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5) Coat the entire pie surface fairly evenly with the flour/sugar/almond mixture.

6) Lay a ring of apricots, cut side down, around the pie surface. Add a second ring inside that & so on until you’ve covered the surface. Now start a second layer beginning with a layer inside the bottom outside layer. Continue until you have used all of the apricots. (its Ok to go to 3 layer near the middle if you want to)

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7) Turn up the edge of the crust until it comes over the outer layer of apricots. It will naturally fold. Pinch the fold then move to the next segment. Keep going until you have folded the crust up all around the pie & have securely pinched it together.
8) Brush the folded edges with an egg wash (or a bit of water) and sprinkle on some sugar.

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9) Cook in the oven until the crust is nice & brown & the apricots are soft. Near the end you may want to turn on your broiler & brown the tops of the apricots & crust. Be careful though!
10) Cool on a rack & serve with ice cream.

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The finished product.

#39 Smithy

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 09:14 AM

Mather! You got it! The intended use is indeed as a drainpipe holder.

Posted Image

Here's one on our house.

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Oh!! I WAS close!!

Is the food use to clamp a filter (cheesecloth, muslin, whatever) to the mouth of a jar so you can pour two-handed and not have the fabric slide into the jar?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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#40 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 09:17 AM

Oh!! I WAS close!!

Is the food use to clamp a filter (cheesecloth, muslin, whatever) to the mouth of a jar so you can pour two-handed and not have the fabric slide into the jar?

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A very good thought, but still not it.

Think simple. I'm going to use mine tonight.

#41 Smithy

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 09:37 AM

That tart is beautiful. If those apricots taste as good as they look, you've got a great source. Are they grown locally? Sorry if I missed that earlier, but going back through the topic I still haven't spotted where you got them, much less how far they had to travel.

To what extent, if at all, is French produce becoming cultivated with an eye to ease of shipping and longer shelf life? California apricots seem to be a casualty of the market pressures, and the things we get out here in Minnesota are pale memories of what we used to be able to get.

Edited to add: if I had a clamp like that and was planning to barbecue, I'd use that ring as a cup-holder outside. Maybe the cup would hold basting fluid, or tools. Maybe it would hold my beverage. I think I'm going to have to get some of those.

Edited by Smithy, 03 July 2007 - 09:41 AM.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#42 Pille

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 10:19 AM

Here's the Apricot Tart recipe with some pictures.

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The finished product.

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Thank you, Dave - it looks fab (and suitably rustic :wink: )! It's quite interesting to have a layer of ground almonds, sugar & flour under the apricots - I wouldn't have thought of that, but I can see it gives a nice extra layer to the cake.
I hope to make it this weekend - and I like tart tarts too :raz:

#43 Chufi

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 10:31 AM

and I like tart tarts too  :raz:

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me too :smile:

Dave, this is wonderful. I need a checkered tablecloth! How lovely that table looks with the croissants and all the homemade jams!

Edited by Chufi, 03 July 2007 - 10:31 AM.


#44 gariotin

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 01:17 PM

The breakfast basket full of beautiful breads - a sight to behold! And your apricot tart looks wonderful.
OK...you are going to use yours tonite...how about a trivet for hot pans on the table?

#45 Marigene

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 01:27 PM

Your breakfast table is mighty inviting, to say nothing of that beautiful apricot tart. Am loving your descriptions of everything. :wink:

#46 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 01:47 PM

Here we go on dinner.
Of course the best laid plans go awry. Linda who had been shopping all day with her friend Jean in Montauban called at about 5:30 to say they were on their way home, but that she wouldn't want any dinner as they had had a big lunch of pintade. Here I am cooking for two on the blog!
Inspiration; I called Rob, Jean's husband, and invited him up for dinner since If Linda didn't want anything neither would Jean. This worked like a charm.

So, here's how you do Anaheim peppers with Brie on the BBQ.

1) Cut the peppers in half length ways. Then cut out the white ribs & scrape out the seeds.
2) Cut a nice piece of Brie into narrow strips.
3) Take both to a nice hot BBQ. Place the cut pepper, cut side down on the grill.
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4) when the peppers start to brown turn them over & put a piece of Brie into the cavity.

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5) let this cook until the Brie has melted and the peppers are soft. (on a hot grill this will only take 3-5 minutes)

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6) serve immediately.

For the zucchini first cut them into quarters length ways. Then coat them lightly with olive oil. Sprinkle herbs de Provence & garlic granules over them.
Place on your hot BBQ skin side down.
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Leave for 3-4 minutes then turn to one side and cook until browned.

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Do the same for the other side then serve hot.

For the Magret (duck breasts) first cut a cross hatch pattern on the fatty side trying to avoid cutting into the meat. Then rub a good coating of sea salt into the fat side.

Next gently sauté the magret, fat side down, in a frying pan on the stove. You will need to pour off & save the rendered duck fat at least twice. This process should take about 15 minutes.

Take the magret(s) to your BBQ and place Skin (fatty) side down on a medium hot grill. Put salt, pepper & fresh thyme leaves on the top.Cook until the fat is crisp & brown.

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Turn the heat up or move to a hot part of the grill and cook the other side. The timing depends upon how well cooked you like your meat. Traditionally, magret is cooked rare, quite pink.
When done take off the grill.

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Note that I was cooking the magret & the zucchini at the same time. Its just practice to get the timings right.

Next cut the magret into thin slices & arrange with the zucchini to serve. As you can see I've added a little pot of ailiade de Toulouse. (I'll give the recipe for this if anybody asks)

Posted Image
Delicious. Rob & I enjoyed ourselves and Linda & Jean had a bit despite not being hungry.

The good news was that Linda & Jean had bought something we could have for dessert.

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Lovely little white grapes marinated in cassis and covered with 70% chocolate.

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Its so easy to eat well!

As for wine we had some more of Sarah's rose and some Burgundian chardonnay.

#47 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 01:58 PM

l.

To what extent, if at all, is French produce becoming cultivated with an eye to ease of shipping and longer shelf life?  California apricots seem to be a casualty of the market pressures, and the things we get out here in Minnesota are pale memories of what we used to be able to get.

Edited to add: if I had a clamp like that and was planning to barbecue, I'd use that ring as a cup-holder outside.  Maybe the cup would hold basting fluid, or tools.  Maybe it would hold my beverage.  I think I'm going to have to get some of those.

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There does seem to be some trend that way, but if you buy your fruits in season on the local markets they will be the real thing. Obviously if you are buying out of season or buying something that isn't grown in France you will tend to get 'factory' farmed produce. Still, I think that in general in France the market doesn't put up with the worst excesses of terrible so called food.

I love your suggestions for uses for the mystery item even though they're wrong. I might just have to add a holder to my BBQ.

#48 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 02:04 PM

The breakfast basket full of beautiful breads - a sight to behold!  And your apricot tart looks wonderful.
OK...you are going to use yours tonite...how about a trivet for hot pans on the table?

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Yet another good idea. This item is getting steadily more useful even though nobody has come up with the use I have in mind and have seen demonstrated.

Keep trying.

#49 gfron1

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 02:16 PM

Mystery object....I'm thinking it will hold either a bottle of wine or a baguette...I would vote for the wine! I'm just not sure why or how :)

#50 Smithy

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 02:41 PM

Recipe for ailiade de Toulouse: yes, I'm asking. Please!

The dinner looks terrific. I didn't see anything that had looked molded or clamped. I didn't see any free-standing terrines or cheesecakes that looked like they'd been molded in a collar of parchment paper held in shape by that clamp. I'm still thinking.

This might be one of the best ways even to develop new uses for old stuff, eh? :laugh:

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#51 Kouign Aman

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 02:46 PM

pastry mold, use to open tough jar lids, set up on end (wood screw into table surface) and use as a target to send watermelon or grape pits thru, off-table "wine bucket" for room temp wine service, cookie cutter.
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#52 Live It Up

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 03:51 PM

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The view down the hill.

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I am trying to figure out if I have been to this town, but I really have no way of determining if I have. When I was 12-15 years old I went to a summer camp in Monsac (or rather near Monsac) for a month every year. We visited a lot of towns in the area and went to a lot of chateaux. We also spent the last week of the month driving around down to Narbonne, and then back up to Paris. Najac certainly looks familiar to me, and whether or not I've been there it certainly brings back good memories. I'm enjoying this blog very much so far. Thanks!

#53 snowangel

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 04:18 PM

Dave, those Anaheims and brie look divine. I'm having folks over tomorrow night, and although I thought I was done grocery shopping, I can see that I need to go and get some Anaheims. I have a very nice sheep's milk brie in the fridge...

That looks like a truely inspired starter.
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#54 mizducky

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 05:06 PM

Are you simply using the mystery clamp as a pastry/cookie cutter?

(As someone who has spent all of two weeks in France in her entire life, I am enjoying this blog greatly.)

#55 Abra

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 06:26 PM

That's a great looking dinner, especially the peppers. What are Anaheim peppers called in French?

I bought some apricots to roast today, before seeing your tart. I'll just give them a litle brush of honey and roast them in a dish, but I'll be thinking of your tart and how delicious it must be.

#56 handmc

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 06:58 PM

Here we go on dinner.
Of course the best laid plans go awry. Linda who had been shopping all day with her friend Jean in Montauban called at about 5:30 to say they were on their way home, but that she wouldn't want any dinner as they had had a big lunch of pintade. Here I am cooking for two on the blog!
Inspiration; I called Rob, Jean's husband, and invited him up for dinner since If Linda didn't want anything neither would Jean. This worked like a charm.

So, here's how you do Anaheim peppers with Brie on the BBQ.

1) Cut the peppers in half length ways. Then cut out the white ribs & scrape out the seeds.
2) Cut a nice piece of Brie into narrow strips.
3) Take both to a nice hot BBQ. Place the cut pepper, cut side down on the grill.
Posted Image

4) when the peppers start to brown turn them over & put a piece of Brie into the cavity.

Posted Image

5) let this cook until the Brie has melted and the peppers are soft. (on a hot grill this will only take 3-5 minutes)

Posted Image
6) serve immediately.

For the zucchini first cut them into quarters length ways. Then coat them lightly with olive oil. Sprinkle herbs de Provence & garlic granules over them.
Place on your hot BBQ skin side down.
Posted Image

Leave for 3-4 minutes then turn to one side and cook until browned.

Posted Image

Do the same for the other side then serve hot.

For the Magret (duck breasts) first cut a cross hatch pattern on the fatty side trying to avoid cutting into the meat. Then rub a good coating of sea salt into the fat side.

Next gently sauté the magret, fat side down, in a frying pan on the stove. You will need to pour off & save the rendered duck fat at least twice. This process should take about 15 minutes.

Take the magret(s) to your BBQ and place Skin (fatty) side down on a medium hot grill. Put salt, pepper & fresh thyme leaves on the top.Cook until the fat is crisp & brown.

Posted Image

Turn the heat up or move to a hot part of the grill and cook the other side. The timing depends upon how well cooked you like your meat. Traditionally, magret is cooked rare, quite pink.
When done take off the grill.

Posted Image

Note that I was cooking the magret & the zucchini at the same time. Its just practice to get the timings right.

Next cut the magret into thin slices & arrange with the zucchini to serve. As you can see I've added a little pot of ailiade de Toulouse. (I'll give the recipe for this if anybody asks)

Posted Image
Delicious. Rob & I enjoyed ourselves and Linda & Jean had a bit despite not being hungry.

The good news was that Linda & Jean had bought something we could have for dessert.

Posted Image
Lovely little white grapes marinated in cassis and covered with 70% chocolate.

Posted Image

Its so easy to eat well!

As for wine we had some more of Sarah's rose and some Burgundian chardonnay.

View Post


Oh my God!! This looks incredible.

**************************************************
Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"



--------------------
One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

#57 judiu

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 07:14 PM

I'm sorry, but you CANNOT tell me that beast in your avatar photo is a POODLE! I thought it was some kind of bear with VERY strange ears. I KNOW a poodle can't hold its' ears up like that; neither can a daschund; no cartilage in the ear itself to keep it erect. So, what's the secret? :rolleyes: :laugh:
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#58 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 11:45 PM

Mystery object....I'm thinking it will hold either a bottle of wine or a baguette...I would vote for the wine!  I'm just not sure why or how :)

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Not there yet!

#59 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 11:47 PM

pastry mold,  use to open tough jar lids, set up on end (wood screw into table surface) and use as a target to send watermelon or grape pits thru,  off-table "wine bucket" for room temp wine service, cookie cutter.

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Wow! What imagination. This is becoming the most versatile device ever.

Still no prize, however.

#60 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 11:51 PM

Dave, those Anaheims and brie look divine.  I'm having folks over tomorrow night, and although I thought I was done grocery shopping, I can see that I need to go and get some Anaheims.  I have a very nice sheep's milk brie in the fridge...

That looks like a truely inspired starter.

View Post


Thanks.

Don't forget to take your Brie out of the fridge early.





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