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Creations from The Art of the Dessert

Dessert

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#1 gfron1

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Posted 22 June 2007 - 10:59 AM

Having just reviewed The Art of the Dessert, now we can start posting our creations from this fantastic book.

I started with three, and have a couple more coming this weekend.

The first thing I made was the Peach Souffle Tartlets with Ginger Peach Ice Cream
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Its been hot here in the high dessert, so I wanted to start with anything that included ice cream. The ginger peach ice cream was really outstanding. I wish I had riper peaches for a more pronounced flavor, but it was good nonetheless. The tartlets had a splash of Grand Marnier combined with lime and peach - great combination! I also really liked the pastry crust recipe for this one - very delicate.
=====
Next, I made the Sour Cream Waffles with Avocado Ice Cream.
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Again, I was wanting something a bit cooler to counter our heat. I had trouble getting my waffles to rise and crisp which I think was a function of my waffle iron. The taste of the waffles was absolutely wonderful and became our breakfast the next morning. The ice cream was as creamy as you would expect and tasted nothing like guacamole (thank goodness!).
=====
The last dessert was terribly mis-seasoned: Fried Mocha Custard Squares.
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I wanted to try things from the book that I normally would not have made, so I asked my spouse to pick a few. He made a long list, but neglected to tell me that some were for making in the fall...this was one of them. An espresso laced, cornstarch-based custard chilled, cut into squares, rolled in croissant crumbs and butter fried. I think that says it all. It was very good, and very not light and summery :raz:

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#2 Pam R

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Posted 22 June 2007 - 11:53 AM

Rob - thanks for starting this topic and for the great review!

I am always on the lookout for great books (especially pastry) and this one will be ordered straight away.

Is the fried custard sitting in . . more custard? It looks luscious.

#3 Tri2Cook

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Posted 22 June 2007 - 12:19 PM

Nice review. It's been a really long time since I bought any cookbooks (already have a ton both from my own collecting and inheriting my mom's large collection) and recently decided to remedy that by ordering a nice pile of books just a few days ago. This book wasn't among them so I can't play along. Maybe a "creations from..." thread using a book I have will come up one day because this sounds fun. Most of the books I ordered aren't particularly new though, just books I've been meaning to order and didn't get around to until now. I'll keep an eye on this thread, there are a few more books I want that I didn't order yet so maybe this one will make the list.

Edited by Tri2Cook, 22 June 2007 - 09:35 PM.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#4 gfron1

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Posted 22 June 2007 - 01:11 PM

Rob - thanks for starting this topic and for the great review!

I am always on the lookout for great books (especially pastry) and this one will be ordered straight away. 

Is the fried custard sitting in . . more custard? It looks luscious.

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The custard is sitting in a chocolate sauce which was my pre-lunch warm-up today!

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#5 jumanggy

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 06:00 AM

It hasn't yet been released at the best bookstore here in Manila... Till then, I'm excited to see what you guys are making!
W/r/t the lack of pictures... I get a little nervous because I might not be doing something right (even a picture of the end result helps), but I have to admit, when a book doesn't have pictures, it makes it even more rewarding to bake, style, and photograph a dessert you've made :smile:

Rob, that fried mocha custard square looks lethal.
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#6 gfron1

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 06:11 AM

Here's my thought on the pictures...I love pictures because they're inspirational, but 1/3 of the book are straightforward recipes like the fried custard and waffles and ice cream. The rest of the book are desserts made up of components that we're all familiar with. So even as I'm creating the desserts, since I'm using familiar components (genoise, buttercream frosting, custards, etc), I'm going to assemble them however I'm most inclined. None of the desserts above had pics and they turned out yummy enough for me to eat. So don't let that stop you when the book comes in - its well worth it.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#7 ejw50

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 02:50 PM

very nice pics

#8 gfron1

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 06:01 PM

Caramel Nut Cake
Posted Image
I need to work on my ganache coating, and I burnt my nuts...rough day! But, this is again super. In fact, I'm kind of sick to my stomach right now because I ate so much of the caramel sauce and caramel buttercream - both were absolutely super.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#9 gfron1

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 10:04 PM

Tonight following a huge mound of baby back ribs we had Sweet Corn Brulee, and at the recipes suggestion I topped it with a not too sharp aged Irish cheddar.
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Amernick says this dessert is "as good as anything I've ever eaten." I think I agree.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#10 gfron1

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 06:56 PM

I wanted to mention that Ann has joined the Society, and is ready to share her insights/experiences/tips with anyone baking from this book on questions specific to the book.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#11 aprilmei

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 08:51 PM

Are the recipes in weights or cup/teaspoon measurements?

#12 gfron1

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 07:56 PM

Both. As she said in her interview, she wanted it to be primarily weight, but the publisher mixed it up. In general, the things that could easily be cups were cups, and the others are weight, and sometimes you get both.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#13 AnnaC

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 09:10 PM

That corn brulee topped with the cheddar looks amazing, and for some reason seems like it would be the perfect snack post-midnight here on the east-coast! What was the texture of the brulee like? What made you decide to go with cubes of cheese versus, say, shavings?

signing off from the land of the deeply-jealous-of-that-dessert-

#14 Fat Guy

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 09:13 PM

I really want to make the cranberry bars. Maybe this fall.

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#15 gfron1

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 05:09 AM

That corn brulee topped with the cheddar looks amazing, and for some reason seems like it would be the perfect snack post-midnight here on the east-coast!  What was the texture of the brulee like?  What made you decide to go with cubes of cheese versus, say, shavings?

signing off from the land of the deeply-jealous-of-that-dessert-

View Post

I had leftover batter that I used again last night. Of course it fell b/c the rising had already happened in storage, but the taste was just as good. The texture...well, if a bowl of good grits made love to a parfait dish of fresh cooked pudding, and honeymooned in a warm hot tub for the evening...that would be the texture. :raz:

As for the cubes v. shaving. I thought about shaving and grating, both of which I thought would make the mind think of a savory dish. The cubes were less than a 1/4" square, and I thought it played better on the rounded ramekin.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#16 gfron1

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 11:33 AM

I haven't made anything in over a week because temps have been near 100 for 2 weeks. But its starting to cool off up here in the mountains and I'm baking again. I wanted to make some low-heat recipes, so I'm doing tarts.

Mont Blanc - chestnut and rum!
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I had to use the Faugier canned chestnut variation for these.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#17 gfron1

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 09:51 PM

(I'm feeling kinda lonely in this topic :unsure: )

Tonight was the Orange Frangiapane Tart. This is an almond cream filling with Grand Marnier, glazed with apricot. I tried two different decorations on top and prefer the almonds.
Posted ImagePosted Image

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#18 Mottmott

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 11:14 PM

(I'm feeling kinda lonely in this topic  :unsure: )

Tonight was the Orange Frangiapane Tart.  This is an almond cream filling with Grand Marnier, glazed with apricot.  I tried two different decorations on top and prefer the almonds.
Posted ImagePosted Image

View Post



Beautiful. Don't give up. I've ordered the book from the library (to look it over carefully before buying it).

I really like cakes where nuts take the place of all or part of the flour. Does she have some of those? I always feel less guilty if I'm getting my Omega-3's while I indulge my sweet tooth.
"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

#19 gfron1

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 05:34 AM

She does have nut flour cakes - I've been avoiding them because of the heat, but last night I decided to go back to my passion - the more complicated multi-day desserts, so I'll get some posted soon.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#20 tsquare

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 10:30 AM

I'm enjoying watching. It's summer, so heating up the house isn't ideal, plus we are trying to keep the sweets to a minimum. Perhaps traffic on this thread will increase in the fall. Now, with stone fruit season almost here, what is in the book in that area?

Bake another for me!

#21 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 02:14 PM

Caramel Nut Cake
Posted Image
I need to work on my ganache coating, and I burnt my nuts...rough day!  But, this is again super.  In fact, I'm kind of sick to my stomach right now because I ate so much of the caramel sauce and caramel buttercream - both were absolutely super.

View Post

This picture keeps catching my eye. I think I'm going to have to make it very soon :).
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#22 Ann Amernick

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 04:38 PM

I hadn't realized that anyone had responded to tthe recipe page. I'm impressed at all the desserts that have been made. If I can answer any questions or help someone in any way, don't hesitate to ask. Hope to hear from you.
Thanks,
Ann

#23 gfron1

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 06:37 AM

How would you like to wake up to this!
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Coffee Eclairs After Robert. Coffee pastry cream filled eclair with a coffee drizzle on top. Very light and smooth.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#24 jumanggy

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 07:17 AM

I'm not a big fan of coffee but that looks really enticing! The book has many variations for pastry cream? (The book's not out here yet. Sigh!)
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#25 Mottmott

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 07:13 AM

I had a problem with The Turkish Rice and Rose Water Pudding. I hope Ann will have the answer to the problem I had.

As I'm still in recovery mode from a hip operation, I thought I'd treat myself to the comfort of the Turkish Rice and Rose Water Pudding. And it looked less demanding than most other recipes, not calling for lifting hot things from the oven. As I have a stool in the kitchen, hanging around to stir from time to time did not present a problem

I followed the recipe exactly, using the half and half for the Turkish Rice recipe. To my surprise it turned out to be a liquidy gruel, not "creamy and loose." The Rose-Water Pudding didn't "gel" completely, but was acceptably thinckened. I like rosewater flavor, so the dessert's flavor was agreeably subtle and suited what I was looking for in my present frame of mind.

The problem was the texture/consistency. I assume there is supposed to be some sort of pleasant interplay between the texture of the two elements.

Two possiblilities:

1. There's a misprint. The recipe as written calls for only 1/3 cup basmati rice to 2 quarts of half and half. This strikes me as a strange ratio for a rice pudding, but I tend to follow a recipe exactly the first time.

2. Sometimes grains and beans behave weirdly if they are too old.
"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

#26 Ann Amernick

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 12:11 PM

I had a problem with The Turkish Rice and Rose Water Pudding. I hope Ann will have the answer to the problem I had.

As I'm still in recovery mode from a hip operation, I thought I'd treat myself to the comfort of the Turkish Rice and Rose Water Pudding. And it looked less demanding than most other recipes, not calling for lifting hot things from the oven. As I have a stool in the kitchen, hanging around to stir from time to time did not present a problem

I followed the recipe exactly, using the half and half for the Turkish Rice recipe. To my surprise it turned out to be a liquidy gruel, not "creamy and loose." The Rose-Water Pudding didn't "gel" completely, but was acceptably thinckened. I like rosewater flavor, so the dessert's flavor was agreeably subtle and suited what I was looking for in my present frame of mind.

The problem was the texture/consistency. I assume there is supposed to be some sort of pleasant interplay between the texture of the two elements.

Two possiblilities:

1. There's a misprint. The recipe as written calls for only 1/3 cup basmati rice to 2 quarts of half and half. This strikes me as a strange ratio for a rice pudding, but I tend to follow a recipe exactly the first time.

2. Sometimes grains and beans behave weirdly if they are too old.

View Post


I did test and retest this recipe.
It does sound like a lot of liquid to the rice but as I stirred it and stirred some more, it thickened and I was really happy with the texture. And the topping of the rose water pudding seemed to marry well with it. I don't know what to tell you here, it may be my taste for these thick kind of porridgey sort of textures. It was liquidy, but the rice was cooked. I would say that you picked a recipe that needs a bit more stirring than you may have been up for. The recipe I like even better is the Red and White Parfait on page 200. Hope I shed some light here.
Ann

#27 Mottmott

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 01:46 PM

[I]

I had a problem with The Turkish Rice and Rose Water Pudding. I hope Ann will have the answer to the problem I had.

As I'm still in recovery mode from a hip operation, I thought I'd treat myself to the comfort of the Turkish Rice and Rose Water Pudding. And it looked less demanding than most other recipes, not calling for lifting hot things from the oven. As I have a stool in the kitchen, hanging around to stir from time to time did not present a problem

I followed the recipe exactly, using the half and half for the Turkish Rice recipe. To my surprise it turned out to be a liquidy gruel, not "creamy and loose." The Rose-Water Pudding didn't "gel" completely, but was acceptably thinckened. I like rosewater flavor, so the dessert's flavor was agreeably subtle and suited what I was looking for in my present frame of mind.

The problem was the texture/consistency. I assume there is supposed to be some sort of pleasant interplay between the texture of the two elements.

Two possiblilities:

1. There's a misprint. The recipe as written calls for only 1/3 cup basmati rice to 2 quarts of half and half. This strikes me as a strange ratio for a rice pudding, but I tend to follow a recipe exactly the first time.

2. Sometimes grains and beans behave weirdly if they are too old.

View Post


I did test and retest this recipe.
It does sound like a lot of liquid to the rice but as I stirred it and stirred some more, it thickened and I was really happy with the texture. And the topping of the rose water pudding seemed to marry well with it. I don't know what to tell you here, it may be my taste for these thick kind of porridgey sort of textures. It was liquidy, but the rice was cooked. I would say that you picked a recipe that needs a bit more stirring than you may have been up for. The recipe I like even better is the Red and White Parfait on page 200. Hope I shed some light here.
Ann

View Post


Thanks for your response. Don't misunderstand. I thought I had done something wrong. The taste was lovely and I will probably make it again as I love rose flavoring. When I discovered how liquidy it turned out, I plated it more like a soup than a pudding, adding a few candied cherries in syrup I'd made with the last of this year's local sour cherries. It was pretty as well as delicately luscious. The pudding which did thicken gave it mouth feel. And I particularly like desserts that depend on flavor rather than cloying sweetness.

I think the rice may not have been as fresh and didn't give off as much starch. The rice cream never coated the back of the spoon enough to make a trail in it. I actually set the timer for each stage to be sure I didn't short time it; then when it looked so liquidy, cooked it a bit more. (In fact, I pulled out some of the rice and smashed it into a paste to stimulate thickening.) Could I have not have had the heat high enough? I used a diffuser to be sure not to burn the half and half.

I'm looking forward to other confections. I am happy to see that you not only give weight measurements, but that you specify which chocolates you use in some of your recipes. I usually buy the Valrhona guanaja in 3 kilo pkgs, but next time I'll get the Caribe as I'm lplanning to try some of your cakes. It's also helpful to see Pouilly Fuisse, not just white wine, and particular brands of sherry rather than a generic term, etc. I believe in doing it your way as near as possible the first time; alterations, if any, after. And lastly, thanks for not making an outsized coffee table book.
"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

#28 gfron1

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 08:00 AM

I had a few extra eclairs that I shared with some friends (just dropped them and ran). These were a few days old, but recrisped as per the recipe. Here's what one friend, a local newspaper writer had to say,

The treats themselves: scrumptious! The filling was a surprise -- this ain't your mama's creme-filled eclair! -- and reminded us of tiramisu with its cocoa and coffee flavor. Where the aforementioned Mama's eclair and creme puff usually are soggy, sweet and goopy, your elegant pastries were sophisticated in their lack of sweetness and very light. If you ever plan to put out a plate of those little creme puffs, you'd better allow 5 or 6 per guest, because I could suck those babies DOWN!

There was definitely a slight liquor flavor. It was so delicate, I thought I might even be imagining it because of the dessert reminding me of tiramisu, thinking I was tasting the marsala wine. But Wally thought it was rum.

Because the traditional Mama's eclair is a favorite from my childhood and a sin in which I rarely indulge these days, I (alone) somewhat missed the soggy-goopy factor. "Oh, grow up, Dee!" I told myself. "You can get that sort of crap at Dunkin' Donuts!" So thank you, also, for expanding my horizons.

I'm not sure what chocolate flavor she is referring to...just espresso and rum, but I thought I would share this b/c its a fun write-up.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#29 Ann Amernick

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Posted 16 July 2007 - 01:35 PM

[I]

I had a problem with The Turkish Rice and Rose Water Pudding. I hope Ann will have the answer to the problem I had.

As I'm still in recovery mode from a hip operation, I thought I'd treat myself to the comfort of the Turkish Rice and Rose Water Pudding. And it looked less demanding than most other recipes, not calling for lifting hot things from the oven. As I have a stool in the kitchen, hanging around to stir from time to time did not present a problem

I followed the recipe exactly, using the half and half for the Turkish Rice recipe. To my surprise it turned out to be a liquidy gruel, not "creamy and loose." The Rose-Water Pudding didn't "gel" completely, but was acceptably thinckened. I like rosewater flavor, so the dessert's flavor was agreeably subtle and suited what I was looking for in my present frame of mind.

The problem was the texture/consistency. I assume there is supposed to be some sort of pleasant interplay between the texture of the two elements.

Two possiblilities:

1. There's a misprint. The recipe as written calls for only 1/3 cup basmati rice to 2 quarts of half and half. This strikes me as a strange ratio for a rice pudding, but I tend to follow a recipe exactly the first time.

2. Sometimes grains and beans behave weirdly if they are too old.

View Post


I did test and retest this recipe.
It does sound like a lot of liquid to the rice but as I stirred it and stirred some more, it thickened and I was really happy with the texture. And the topping of the rose water pudding seemed to marry well with it. I don't know what to tell you here, it may be my taste for these thick kind of porridgey sort of textures. It was liquidy, but the rice was cooked. I would say that you picked a recipe that needs a bit more stirring than you may have been up for. The recipe I like even better is the Red and White Parfait on page 200. Hope I shed some light here.
Ann

View Post


Thanks for your response. Don't misunderstand. I thought I had done something wrong. The taste was lovely and I will probably make it again as I love rose flavoring. When I discovered how liquidy it turned out, I plated it more like a soup than a pudding, adding a few candied cherries in syrup I'd made with the last of this year's local sour cherries. It was pretty as well as delicately luscious. The pudding which did thicken gave it mouth feel. And I particularly like desserts that depend on flavor rather than cloying sweetness.

I think the rice may not have been as fresh and didn't give off as much starch. The rice cream never coated the back of the spoon enough to make a trail in it. I actually set the timer for each stage to be sure I didn't short time it; then when it looked so liquidy, cooked it a bit more. (In fact, I pulled out some of the rice and smashed it into a paste to stimulate thickening.) Could I have not have had the heat high enough? I used a diffuser to be sure not to burn the half and half.

I'm looking forward to other confections. I am happy to see that you not only give weight measurements, but that you specify which chocolates you use in some of your recipes. I usually buy the Valrhona guanaja in 3 kilo pkgs, but next time I'll get the Caribe as I'm lplanning to try some of your cakes. It's also helpful to see Pouilly Fuisse, not just white wine, and particular brands of sherry rather than a generic term, etc. I believe in doing it your way as near as possible the first time; alterations, if any, after. And lastly, thanks for not making an outsized coffee table book.

View Post


When I made this, the pudding really did thicken, so it's possible that the rice was different enough that there was a problem, although it's hard to figure. But I do know that there are so many variables. For instance, in the Wellington and Vanilla Nut cookies, I call for almond paste, and specifically NOT Marzipan. But when I demonstated the Wellingtons in a different area of the country, the only Almond Paste they had for me was Solo brand. And the sugar content was higher than the almond, making it more like marzipan. So the cookie really looked different. I used AA Almond paste for testing purposes and the difference was marked. And Solo was an Almond Paste. So all of this factors in. But just know how much I appreciate your trying the book and the recipes and any guidance or help, don't hesitate to ask.
Thanks,
Ann

#30 gfron1

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 06:28 AM

Blackberry Fool - blackberry puree in whipped cream on a split croissant square.
Posted Image
My spouse loved this because it wasn't too sweet. Really nice taste, and once you get past the croissant dough making, its very simple. I put too much blackberry puree in the whipped cream so it is a bit runny.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM






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