Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Pickles--Cook-Off 32

Cookoff Condiments

  • Please log in to reply
176 replies to this topic

#31 SheenaGreena

SheenaGreena
  • participating member
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Baltimore/DC

Posted 14 June 2007 - 10:17 PM



I would LOVE to make kimchi, but it is such a pain in the butt.  You need a bunch of different ingredients and it is really labour intensive and takes forever.  Take radish kimchee for example, that stuff takes forever to eat and the wait is excrutiating.

View Post


Sheena: Have you made kimchi before? How long does it take? The recipe I was considering only calls for a few days (3?) of fermentation. Also, I think I have all the ingredients on hand except for the fresh seafood and vegetables. But I have been known to underestimate the PITA factor, so let me know what I'm getting myself into.

View Post



nope never made kimchi before, but I've watched my mother and my grandmother make it my whole life. You need to salt the cabbage (my mother usually buys an entire box of cabbage to make kimchi) overnight then you need to add seasonings to taste. I have never seen my mom or family members measuring anything like salt, msg, gochugaru, garlic, etc. Does it really only take 3 days to ferment? I like it fermented longer...I like the taste of fresh kimchee dont get me wrong, but when its ripe and stinky then it's like a fine wine or fine cheese.


what ingredients did you buy? You should make kimchee and post pics because I would love to see you make it. When you are done you can mail me a jar :raz:
BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

#32 annecros

annecros
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,643 posts
  • Location:South Broward County, Florida

Posted 18 June 2007 - 07:21 AM



I would LOVE to make kimchi, but it is such a pain in the butt.  You need a bunch of different ingredients and it is really labour intensive and takes forever.  Take radish kimchee for example, that stuff takes forever to eat and the wait is excrutiating.

View Post


Sheena: Have you made kimchi before? How long does it take? The recipe I was considering only calls for a few days (3?) of fermentation. Also, I think I have all the ingredients on hand except for the fresh seafood and vegetables. But I have been known to underestimate the PITA factor, so let me know what I'm getting myself into.

View Post



nope never made kimchi before, but I've watched my mother and my grandmother make it my whole life. You need to salt the cabbage (my mother usually buys an entire box of cabbage to make kimchi) overnight then you need to add seasonings to taste. I have never seen my mom or family members measuring anything like salt, msg, gochugaru, garlic, etc. Does it really only take 3 days to ferment? I like it fermented longer...I like the taste of fresh kimchee dont get me wrong, but when its ripe and stinky then it's like a fine wine or fine cheese.


what ingredients did you buy? You should make kimchee and post pics because I would love to see you make it. When you are done you can mail me a jar :raz:

View Post



Now see, that's why people don't pickle more often, I think. It is so ingrained into our way of thinking, that everyone feels like they have to pickle a bushel or nothing. It is what put me off pickling for a very long time. I had trouble getting past the vision of my Granny with bushel baskets of cukes limed and curing in crocks for days.

Then, I realized, I can just do a quart or a few half pints of any particular pickle, as long as I kept the proportions to scale in the interests of food safety and quality of the finished product. Some more complex things (such a KimChi, corn relish, chow chow, the chutneys, etc.) that require several ingredients are hard to downsize, but it can be done. Once I shed myself of the "quantity" pressure, and most pickling recipes are scaled for huge quantities, it opened up a new world for me and I was able to experiment with different flavor profiles and find out what worked for my and my family's taste.

#33 Pam R

Pam R
  • manager
  • 6,828 posts
  • Location:Winnipeg, Canada

Posted 18 June 2007 - 12:51 PM

Now see, that's why people don't pickle more often, I think. It is so ingrained into our way of thinking, that everyone feels like they have to pickle a bushel or nothing. It is what put me off pickling for a very long time. I had trouble getting past the vision of my Granny with bushel baskets of cukes limed and curing in crocks for days.

In the spirit of great minds thinking alike . . .
Posted Image

Posted Image

These aren't the 'right' cucumbers. I had to cut them into approximately 8 pieces (4 quarters that were each cut diagonally in half) to get them to fit into two 500 mL jars. I did these Friday after work, and I'm going to open them up and taste tonight.

By Saturday, they sure smelled like pickles. And they've slowly been changing colour. If they're good tonight I'll put them in the fridge.

#34 lovebenton0

lovebenton0
  • participating member
  • 1,205 posts
  • Location:Kenosha WI, on Lake Michigan

Posted 18 June 2007 - 01:56 PM

if i understand that we are counting all sorts of ''pickled preserves'' there may be others not named strictly pickles lurking in recipegullet also... perhaps relishes, chow chows, or chutneys.

while scoping out existing recipes you might want to consider these two:peppery green tomato corn relish and spicy pineapple/rhubarb chutney.

i love pickles of all sorts. so, yes, do count me in. i may not be very active for the next couple of weeks as i'll be away from home, but i'll try to get something pickled before i leave on wednesday. hmmm... maybe this afternoon for dinner tomorrow... shaved carrot and thinly sliced onion pickled with a serrano pepper and garlic clove or two is a nice quickie to serve with hot weather grilled chicky and arugula sandwich. the rhubard/apricot/serrano chutney i made last week is fantastic with chicken also, but in honor of this cook-off i'll try something else this week. :wink:

when i had a big garden in central tx i could pickle loads of goods from my own plants and trees. now i'm living on lake michigan with a small plot in the yard, gifted to me by my garden-loving landlady. i'm limited in space, variety and length of growing season. so some pickles will come from my homegrown food and some will come from vegs/fruits purchased at one of the numerous farmer's markets close to me. this is new for me; i always pickled/preserved what i grew myself. but there's no shame in taking advantage of good produce from a good source.

pickled watermelon was always the sweet pickle treat on our table for thanksgiving when i was a kid. i continued that tradition with my own family, pickling my own watermelon rind late in the summer. probably my favorite sweet pickle ever. and there's just something wonderful about using what most people consider garbage or compost material to make a fabulous sweet treat that shines like amber/green glass. :biggrin:
Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

#35 NWKate

NWKate
  • participating member
  • 106 posts

Posted 18 June 2007 - 07:48 PM

" For anyone who ever espies a copy of the Farm Journal Canning book at a garage sale or thrift store, pick up a copy."

HA! I found this at Goodwill and lent it to a friend...just last week, I got it back before she "forgot" from whence it came!

Kate

#36 Pam R

Pam R
  • manager
  • 6,828 posts
  • Location:Winnipeg, Canada

Posted 18 June 2007 - 07:53 PM

pickled watermelon was always the sweet pickle treat on our table for thanksgiving when i was a kid.  i continued that tradition with my own family, pickling my own watermelon rind late in the summer. probably my favorite sweet pickle ever. and there's just something wonderful about using what most people consider garbage or compost material to make a fabulous sweet treat that shines like amber/green glass.  :biggrin:

View Post

What goes into a watermelon pickle? (Yes, I'm still waiting for my pickling books to arrive.)

#37 SheenaGreena

SheenaGreena
  • participating member
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Baltimore/DC

Posted 18 June 2007 - 08:35 PM

I love watermelon rind pickles. I can always get those from the amish or mennonites that live in maryland. I think I should buy a jar of those when I go home in 3 weeks...that and chow chow yum!
BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

#38 polly

polly
  • participating member
  • 253 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 04:17 AM

Count me in. I love pickling, and just this morning I bought some little onions to pickle.
I might try an Indian style carrot pickle I made up a while ago, and as it is winter here in Australia, maybe something with cabbage, cauliflower or fennel.
I'm getting excited now, it's off to write down some ideas...
How sad; a house full of condiments and no food.

#39 Hiroyuki

Hiroyuki
  • participating member
  • 5,124 posts
  • Location:Shiozawa area of Minami Uonuma city, Niigata, Japan

Posted 19 June 2007 - 04:39 AM

I bought a pack of small melons for pickling and "sagohachi"
Posted Image

Sagohachi is a pickling bed of salt, rice malt (koji), and steamed rice mixed together at a ratio of 3:5:8 (san-go-hachi in Japanese), thus its name.

Posted Image

I'll report back tommorrow.

#40 SheenaGreena

SheenaGreena
  • participating member
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Baltimore/DC

Posted 19 June 2007 - 05:05 AM

hiroyuki are those "melons" in fact fat zucchinis (sp?)? Those are really delicious coated, deep fried, and served with a soy dipping sauce.

never had pickled zuchini but it sounds great
BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

#41 SheenaGreena

SheenaGreena
  • participating member
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Baltimore/DC

Posted 19 June 2007 - 06:21 AM

I just made my version of oi moochim without the oi (cucumber). I took the recipe from egulleter zenkimchi's blog. After reading his blog entry about oi kimchi I knew I had to make my own. I was planning on buying a few cukes today....but I wanted to try it with some radishes. The radishes I have are either chinese or japanese I have no clue. They are long, skinny (width of an inch), and mostly green with a bit of white at the bottom.

here is zenkimchi's recipe zenkimchi's oi moochim recipe

instead of honey or corn syrup I used sugar and am planning on using probably a teaspoon more of gochugaru.

This recipe is great as a side dish with grilled kalbi and eaten outside.

Next I am going to make some mul kimchi which is water kimchi.



eta: here is a photo of the daikon I'm using green daikon

Edited by SheenaGreena, 19 June 2007 - 06:25 AM.

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

#42 Hiroyuki

Hiroyuki
  • participating member
  • 5,124 posts
  • Location:Shiozawa area of Minami Uonuma city, Niigata, Japan

Posted 19 June 2007 - 03:09 PM

hiroyuki are those "melons" in fact fat zucchinis (sp?)?  Those are really delicious coated, deep fried, and served with a soy dipping sauce.

never had pickled zuchini but it sounds great

View Post

They are thinned melons, and they are often pickled in Japan.

I tasted the pickle this morning, and found it wasn't as flavorful as it should be. Apparantly, lactic acid bacteria fermentation hasn't started yet because the room temperature was 30 C last night and I had to put the container in the fridge. Sagohachi has to be kept below 18 C. It will take some more time until fermentation takes place.

#43 annecros

annecros
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,643 posts
  • Location:South Broward County, Florida

Posted 20 June 2007 - 12:16 AM

I started my pickled eggs yesterday.

Posted Image


Because they are not processed and are a fridge pickle, I got to use one of my old bail type canning jars. The authorities say they are not safe for home canning uses, but I have a source for the gaskets and think they are pretty, so I use them when I don't have to process in a boiling water bath or under pressure. They make me smile.

Half a dozen peeled hard cooked eggs, half a sliced onion, three serrano peppers from the garden, three cloves of garlic, mustard seed, cumin seed, red pepper flakes, salt, three dashes of tobasco, all loaded into the sterilized quart jar. Distilled white vinegar and water in a 50/50 ratio, brought to a boil and poured over the eggs/veg.

When they cool, into the fridge for a week to 10 days, then they are ready to go.

I think the longest I've ever kept them is 6 months, but they do get rubbery after a month or two. Hubby eats them with a cold beer after mowing the lawn or working in the garden on a hot summer day. I like them sliced on a cold salad from time to time. Hubby considers the pickled onion, garlic cloves and pepper his personal treat.

Will post a pic of the first sliced one when they are ready.

#44 SheenaGreena

SheenaGreena
  • participating member
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Baltimore/DC

Posted 20 June 2007 - 07:25 AM

wow I love pickled eggs, but I've only had them with pickled beets so they are purple in the end rather than just white. When they are pickled with the beets they turn really sweet and go really well as a side to pretty much everything, but especially sauerkraut and pork
BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

#45 annecros

annecros
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,643 posts
  • Location:South Broward County, Florida

Posted 20 June 2007 - 07:59 AM

wow I love pickled eggs, but I've only had them with pickled beets so they are purple in the end rather than just white.  When they are pickled with the beets they turn really sweet and go really well as a side to pretty much everything, but especially sauerkraut and pork

View Post


I use beets when I want to do them sweet, and lots of onion, cider vinegar and brown sugar, a couple of cloves, and sometimes even some fennel seed if I am feeling frisky. That is the winter pickled egg version around here. :biggrin:

Summer, I go hot (as in spicy) and tart them up! Great with sliced tomato.

Maybe I'll go ahead and do a jar of sweet to demonstrate the comparison. The two types sliced on a plate should be pretty.

#46 DCP

DCP
  • participating member
  • 258 posts
  • Location:Baltimore metro area, MD, USA

Posted 20 June 2007 - 11:17 AM

I use beets when I want to do them sweet, and lots of onion, cider vinegar and brown sugar, a couple of cloves, and sometimes even some fennel seed if I am feeling frisky. That is the winter pickled egg version around here. :biggrin:

Summer, I go hot (as in spicy) and tart them up! Great with sliced tomato.

Maybe I'll go ahead and do a jar of sweet to demonstrate the comparison. The two types sliced on a plate should be pretty.

View Post


The photo you posted earlier looks great, and both varieties sound tasty. Would you be willing to share more precise quantities/recipes for both varieties?
David aka "DCP"
Amateur protein denaturer, Maillard reaction experimenter, & gourmand-at-large

#47 annecros

annecros
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,643 posts
  • Location:South Broward County, Florida

Posted 20 June 2007 - 11:32 AM

I use beets when I want to do them sweet, and lots of onion, cider vinegar and brown sugar, a couple of cloves, and sometimes even some fennel seed if I am feeling frisky. That is the winter pickled egg version around here. :biggrin:

Summer, I go hot (as in spicy) and tart them up! Great with sliced tomato.

Maybe I'll go ahead and do a jar of sweet to demonstrate the comparison. The two types sliced on a plate should be pretty.

View Post


The photo you posted earlier looks great, and both varieties sound tasty. Would you be willing to share more precise quantities/recipes for both varieties?

View Post


Of course. Will post recipes in RecipeGullet as a "Grand Pickle Finale" with links. :biggrin: I plan on a relish tray that any Southern Lady would be proud to walk into a family reunion/funeral with!

Seriously, though, teaspoon, teaspoon, teaspoon when working in these small quantities. Usually loaded in the jar before the brine hits it.

The sweet ones, well, I will just have to see if I can find, and purchase, one or two beets fresh. If not, I will cheat and use a half pint of off the shelf pickled beets, otherwise I would cook the beets in the brine while I was bringing it to a boil.

#48 SheenaGreena

SheenaGreena
  • participating member
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Baltimore/DC

Posted 20 June 2007 - 11:33 AM

I'd love to see your rendition of pickled eggs and beets. My grandmother makes her own every summer and I can eat just beets and pickled eggs for a meal.
BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

#49 Pam R

Pam R
  • manager
  • 6,828 posts
  • Location:Winnipeg, Canada

Posted 20 June 2007 - 03:26 PM

I left the pickles on the counter from Friday evening until yesterday (Tuesday) morning. Tried one this morning (mmm. . . breakfast) and it wasn't done enough for my taste. I knew I was a fully sour girl. Is it safe to pull it out and set it on the counter for another couple of days?

They're also a little salty - I'll have to adjust that.

#50 Live It Up

Live It Up
  • participating member
  • 311 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 20 June 2007 - 05:17 PM

So I did pickle something, but not kimchi yet. I made red onion pickles from this blog which were aparently "inspired" by the Zuni Cafe cookbook. I don't have the cookbook, so I don't know how close the recipes are. Anyway, I decided to french my onions, rather than cut them in rings. Here's a pic of the prepped onions:
Posted Image

Brine:
Posted Image

You blanch the onions in the brine in batches, then let them cool and repeat the process.
Posted Image
Posted Image

The recipe calls for doing this process 3 times. Because my onion pieces were so much smaller than the recipe I decided to only do it twice.
Here's the finished product in a recycled kimchi jar.
Posted Image
sorry it's a little blurry.
These are going to be eaten on some burgers on saturday, so I'll update then.

#51 SheenaGreena

SheenaGreena
  • participating member
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Baltimore/DC

Posted 20 June 2007 - 08:35 PM

live it up, your fingernails are pretty they match your pickled onions very well (:

what kind of kimchi are you going to make? cabbage?
BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

#52 SheenaGreena

SheenaGreena
  • participating member
  • 1,171 posts
  • Location:Baltimore/DC

Posted 20 June 2007 - 10:20 PM

alright, heres some pics of oi muchim that I made. Like the radish version, I took most of the ingredients and measurements from zenkimchi's recipe.

I guess this is what you would call a "quick pickle"

I used: gochujang, gochugaru, sugar, sesame seeds, and rice wine vinegar

here's a photo of the ingredients I used. The gochujang looks scary, but at least its homemade

Posted Image

here's a pic of all the ingredients minus the cukes all mixed up and ready to go

Posted Image

salted cukes

Posted Image

end product

Posted Image
BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA

#53 Varmint

Varmint
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 5,136 posts
  • Location:Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 21 June 2007 - 07:13 AM

I also made some pickled red onions last night. I combined a cup of white vinegar, a cup of water, and a cup of sugar. Brought it to a boil, added mustard seed, celery seed, fennel seed, bay leaf, some red peppercorns, and some salt. I then poured this over the sliced red onions and have let it sit in the refrigerator overnight. Sweet and sour! These will go with a simple goat cheese, bacon and beet salad on Saturday.
Dean McCord
VarmintBites

#54 Chris Amirault

Chris Amirault
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 19,622 posts
  • Location:Rhode Island

Posted 21 June 2007 - 01:06 PM

Dean, how thick are those onion slices?
Chris Amirault
camirault@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics Signatory
Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

#55 snowangel

snowangel
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 8,140 posts
  • Location:Twin Cities, MN

Posted 21 June 2007 - 08:33 PM

I also made some pickled red onions last night.  I combined a cup of white vinegar, a cup of water, and a cup of sugar.  Brought it to a boil, added mustard seed, celery seed, fennel seed, bay leaf, some red peppercorns, and some salt.  I then poured this over the sliced red onions and have let it sit in the refrigerator overnight.  Sweet and sour!  These will go with a simple goat cheese, bacon and beet salad on Saturday.

View Post


These things are also really good on smoked butt.
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#56 Varmint

Varmint
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 5,136 posts
  • Location:Raleigh, North Carolina

Posted 22 June 2007 - 04:22 AM

The slices are about 1/4". I had some on a burger last night, and they were great.
Dean McCord
VarmintBites

#57 annecros

annecros
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,643 posts
  • Location:South Broward County, Florida

Posted 22 June 2007 - 04:28 AM

I started green tomato pickles and chow chow last night. Two very different pickles, but the same method. We are culling a couple of tomato plants this weekend, and I had a lot of greenies.

Here are the green tomatoes (4 cups quartered), vidalia onion (1 cup chopped), green bell pepper (1/2 cup chopped), and celery (1/2 cup chopped) salted down to drain overnight.

Posted Image

Here are the vegetables for the chow chow - cabbage (4 cups), red onion (1 cup), red bell pepper (1 cup), and green tomatoes (4 cups) also salted down to drain overnight.

Posted Image

Now that they have drained, today I will blanch, can and process both batches. I hope I can keep that color in the jar. Will report back.

#58 Hiroyuki

Hiroyuki
  • participating member
  • 5,124 posts
  • Location:Shiozawa area of Minami Uonuma city, Niigata, Japan

Posted 22 June 2007 - 04:50 AM

My thinned melons look like this today.
Posted Image
It seems that fermentation is not yet complete, and the melons are quite salty.
It's not the right time of the year to start a sagohachi bed because the room temprature is too high for the fermentation and the temperature inside the fridge is too low. :sad:

#59 Shelby

Shelby
  • society donor
  • 2,074 posts

Posted 22 June 2007 - 05:37 AM

In a few weeks I'll be pickling baby corn, so I'll try to take pictures!

I've enjoyed seeing all of your different items!!

#60 Live It Up

Live It Up
  • participating member
  • 311 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 22 June 2007 - 07:50 AM

live it up, your fingernails are pretty they match your pickled onions very well (:

what kind of kimchi are you going to make?  cabbage?

View Post

Thanks! I'm going to make whole cabbage kimchi when I run out of the stuff I just bought. Those cucumbers you made look really good.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Cookoff, Condiments