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Fancy Food Show July 8-10 2007


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#1 docsconz

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 02:50 PM

I am hoping to attend this year's Fancy Food Show at the Javits Center in July.

Since this will be my first experience there and the volume of the show appears daunting, I would love to see what tips, tricks and strategies eGullet Society members have used and recommend for getting the most out of the show. Here, here, here, here
here and here are topics on previous years' shows.

I am particularly interested to know which eGullet Society members may be exhibiting, what they will be exhibiting and where they will be.
John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."
- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

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#2 rooftop1000

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 04:56 PM

Hey Doc

Mayhawman (Brooks) is usually there as am I, but he is actually working :blink:
My advice....
good shoes, loose pants, no rings.
Think before you put that in your mouth if it doesnt really sound good it might not be.
If you have any sodium issues be even more carefull/ and drink lots of water at the aisle ends

Now the fun part, this thing is freeking amazing the Entire Javits Center filled with food and its all yours
They set up rows of States downstairs and Countries upstairs, I usually start downs stairs to the right just for the hell of it ( and there used to be waffles over there)
They offer clear plastic shopping bags for your Literature, if you are careful you can tuck samples in there Officially no samples to be removed, no cameras either. You dont want to carry anything into the show.

I may be on my own this year on the Sunday if anyone wants to meet-up.

tracey
The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers
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#3 markk

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 05:38 PM

How many days can you attend? That'll make a big difference in the answer. (I go every year.)
Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”
Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”
Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”
Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

#4 Beanie

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 01:13 PM

Here are some additional tips:

1. Preregister. Otherwise, you will be waiting on long lines at the registration booth. You can register on the show's web site, here.

2. If you go on Sunday, it will be very crowded. Even though the show is supposedly open to the trade only, the trade can register "guests." Sunday in NY.... free food. If they're not at Zabars or the Hamptons, they're at the show. Sharpen your elbows.

3. The above web site includes links to floor plans and lists of exhibitors. Each exhibit booth is numbered. If you know in advance that you want to visit specific vendors, you can find their locations on the floor plans. Plan this out now so that when you arrive, you'll have specific destinations.

4. A printed guide will be available near the registration area. It contains the exhibitors and floor plans. Browse through it to get a sense of who is located where. It also cross references vendors by product type.

5. As noted by rooftop1000, the international pavilions are on the first level. So are the large wholesale distributors. The lower level is divided into regions or States. Because of my interest in regional products, I have always enjoyed the lower level where the exhibitors tend to be made up of smaller and/or newer companies.

6. Both floors have many independent vendors who are not part of larger categories. There is no rhyme or reason to their location. So the charcuterie purveyor will be next to the chocolatier who is next to the soy smoothie or gummi candy vendor.

7. Do not eat a large breakfast and don't plan on lunch. You will spend the day tasting dozens of items in random order, as noted in #6.

8. I agree with Markk; number of days attending will make a difference. I've done it in one day, traveling r/t from Albany. Exhausting and not recommended.

9. Most of all, enjoy. It's an awesome experience.
Ilene

#5 docsconz

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 01:36 PM

How many days can you attend?  That'll make a big difference in the answer.  (I go every year.)

View Post


I will probably be able to do a day and a half - most likely Sunday and part of Monday.

Beanie, thanks for your thoughtful recommendations. Are there any specific producers that you consider "must" visits?
John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."
- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

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#6 markk

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 05:58 PM

How many days can you attend?  That'll make a big difference in the answer.  (I go every year.)

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I will probably be able to do a day and a half - most likely Sunday and part of Monday.

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You can probably see a great portion of the show in that time.

As to your question about what producers to see (though it wasn't directed at me), I'd suggest that you lose a lot of time if you try to pick them out and go from one to the other. I think a better way is to start at one end and work your way through, and I think that you can accomplish a lot in a day and a half, and finding things in strange juxtaposition is quite interesting.

Aside from Beanie's excellent suggestions, here's my take:

I like to start in the North East hall - where you'll see the banners that say "Italy", but that may be because I can eat my body weight in prosciutto and Parmiggiano-Reggiano. I work my way back to the main entrance, and then I do the north-west part of the hall, where I find lots of interesting things. Except for the fact that D'Artagnan is sometimes in the South Hall (south-west corner last year), I don't have great luck in that hall. I do a fast walk through, and then head downstairs, where the booths are smaller, as a rule, and very intresting as well.

Of course, I'm not a candy or chocolate or dessert person, so I usually bypass those booths, and if I have spotted one that I must try, I try to end up there at the end of the day.

Edited by markk, 14 June 2007 - 06:01 PM.

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”
Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”
Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”
Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

#7 Beanie

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 02:15 PM

There's an introduction to the show on the podcast on this link. It's geared toward the trade.

I agree with Mark about starting on one end and working your way through. Even when I've planned out an "itinerary," I've found myself wandering up and down aisles, just checking out the exhibits that interested me. One thing that I've enjoyed is the Focused Tastings, located usually at the rear of the lower floor (I think). Each year they pick a few categories of foods to feature, such as salsa, olive oil, etc., and offer tastings of several dozen products in the category.

Also, to clarify my previous post, I referred to the "first level" where many of the international pavilions are located. This is actually Level 3 -- the main exhibit floor that Mark refers to. Level 1 is downstairs, and international vendors are located there, too.
Ilene

#8 Gastro888

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 04:32 AM

If you can go all 3 days, go for all 3 days. The NASFT show is alot of fun for foodies. Sunday is when all the vendors expect the non-professionals to attend to sample food. Monday & Tuesday is when business deals are made. If you have time, go Tuesday and linger until they're about to close. That's when you score big at the booths. Depending on the vendor, they'll just give stuff away to anyone because they don't want to lug it back home. Wear comfortable shoes & clothes but try to be a step above casual. Vendors respond better if you don't look sloppy.

Just my thoughts...

Edited by Gastro888, 26 June 2007 - 04:33 AM.


#9 menton1

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 04:33 PM

If you can go all 3 days, go for all 3 days.  The NASFT show is alot of fun for foodies.  Sunday is when all the vendors expect the non-professionals to attend to sample food.  Monday & Tuesday is when business deals are made.  If you have time, go Tuesday and linger until they're about to close.  That's when you score big at the booths.  Depending on the vendor, they'll just give stuff away to anyone because they don't want to lug it back home.  Wear comfortable shoes & clothes but try to be a step above casual.  Vendors respond better if you don't look sloppy.

Just my thoughts...

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When you say "non-professionals", are you implying that there is a way for people not in the trade to attend this show? If so, give us Eg-ers a heads-up!

#10 Luckylies

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 04:14 AM

If you can go all 3 days, go for all 3 days.  The NASFT show is alot of fun for foodies.  Sunday is when all the vendors expect the non-professionals to attend to sample food.  Monday & Tuesday is when business deals are made.  If you have time, go Tuesday and linger until they're about to close.  That's when you score big at the booths.  Depending on the vendor, they'll just give stuff away to anyone because they don't want to lug it back home.  Wear comfortable shoes & clothes but try to be a step above casual.  Vendors respond better if you don't look sloppy.

Just my thoughts...

View Post


When you say "non-professionals", are you implying that there is a way for people not in the trade to attend this show? If so, give us Eg-ers a heads-up!

View Post



Certain nefarious individuals have been know to register a sham business in order to get into the show...

I don't know anyone like that, nope, not a one....

:cool:

this year, I'm press... whoa, free pass :cool:
does this come in pork?

My name's Emma Feigenbaum.

#11 Gastro888

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Posted 28 June 2007 - 05:09 AM

If you can go all 3 days, go for all 3 days.  The NASFT show is alot of fun for foodies.  Sunday is when all the vendors expect the non-professionals to attend to sample food.  Monday & Tuesday is when business deals are made.  If you have time, go Tuesday and linger until they're about to close.  That's when you score big at the booths.  Depending on the vendor, they'll just give stuff away to anyone because they don't want to lug it back home.  Wear comfortable shoes & clothes but try to be a step above casual.  Vendors respond better if you don't look sloppy.

Just my thoughts...

View Post


When you say "non-professionals", are you implying that there is a way for people not in the trade to attend this show? If so, give us Eg-ers a heads-up!

View Post

People get in through various means - friends of people exhibiting/attending the show, registering online early (when they don't check creds), etc. You can get in, but I don't know the other ways besides those two.

#12 pennbrew

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 06:12 PM

Just a reminder, tomorrow (Friday July 6) is the last day to pre-register at $35. It'll be $60 and a lot more hassle at the door.

I think I'll be there on Sunday, possibly Monday. Should be fun!

---Guy

#13 Beth E.

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 12:55 PM

Does anyone know if they check photo id at the entrance to the show if you already have a badge?

#14 pennbrew

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Posted 06 July 2007 - 03:28 PM

If you already have a badge, there is no photo ID check at the door.


---Guy

#15 LilianNY

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Posted 07 July 2007 - 09:09 AM

If anyone comes across any especially interesting characters or stories or trends at the show which would work for a feature story, please let me know. Thanks. I'll be there but it seems so huge I could use help from extra pairs of eyes (and mouths).

Edited by LilianNY, 07 July 2007 - 09:10 AM.


#16 Beth E.

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 07:36 AM

So what did everyone think of the Fancy Food show?

My take -- not too much new under the sun. Hybiscus is big this year as are Goji berries.

Take your minted water please. When I'm thirsty I want a drink not mouthwash.

I love all the cheese and the olives.

#17 docsconz

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 07:51 AM

So what did everyone think of the Fancy Food show?

My take -- not too much new under the sun. Hybiscus is big this year as are Goji berries.

Take your minted water please.  When I'm thirsty I want a drink not mouthwash.

I love all the cheese and the olives.

View Post


Not all minted waters (or other products were created equally) :wink: I thought the show was a load of fun. I'm working on a report that I hope to have ready soon.
John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."
- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

#18 MarkIsCooking

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 11:39 AM

I'd love to hear more about the show and what people thought of it this year. If you're not hard-core in the food business, would it still be a cool trip to take (i.e. next year for me)????

Please tell.
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#19 docsconz

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 12:23 PM

I'd love to hear more about the show and what people thought of it this year.  If you're not hard-core in the food business, would it still be a cool trip to take (i.e. next year for me)????

Please tell.

View Post


I had a blast. To borrow a cliche, it was like being a kid in a candy store, except that one actually got to taste most things.
John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."
- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

#20 gfron1

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 12:41 PM

That's the big report you've been working on?! :raz:

(I'll look forward to the real one!)

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#21 Gastro888

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 01:39 PM

The show was a good show as always. I tried so many wonderful things. I loved the Twelve bubbly tea beverage, the truffle pizza from Divine Pasta, HiBall energy drink, and pretty much any salumi I could eat.

My favorite was that I was able to sample some Indian mangoes. Unfortunately, I found out that they're more hype than anything else.

eta: Some people get in the shows by working for the exhibitors. Wages range from $10/hour to $150 a day. Local culinary schools will have postings for these positions.

I liked the pop rice crackers they had in the Korea area. I've had them before but it was a treat to eat them super fresh. There's not a whole lot to dislike at the FF Show. I mean, hello, it's a food show.

Edited by Gastro888, 11 July 2007 - 01:54 PM.


#22 dockhl

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 05:45 PM

I think the one in Jan'08 will be in San Diego ! Whoo hoo ! I am SO there..............

Love to hear more, please !

#23 Gastro888

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 05:33 AM

The Jan 2008 one will be in San Diego. Try to get in and work the show, especially on the last day when exhibitors give away their goodies. One show last year, I went home with some truffle oil.

The FF show is a great event for foodies but I do want to advise people to be polite. Not that egulleters need that reminder but believe you me, some people were at the show with no home training at all. Ugh. I know you guys won't hararss the vendors, demand outrageous samples, and will say "Please" and "Thank you".

Selma's is a baked goods company that makes awesome marshmallow-Rice Krispies treats that are far better than anything I have had to date. Not overly sweet, no artifical taste, and a "clean" finish (if there is such a thing with this type of food).

I gorged on pasta at the show. (Normally I don't eat much pasta because I have to watch my weight) Using premium pasta makes a huge difference. The sauce does cling to the pasta better and you get this wonderful toothsomeness to it. So does cooking it properly. The Italian-American companies cooked their pasta past al dente while te European companies hit it on the mark. I'll try and find the name of this one company that makes bronze die cut pasta.

Edited by Gastro888, 12 July 2007 - 05:35 AM.


#24 zoe b

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 06:11 AM

  The Italian-American companies cooked their pasta past al dente while te European companies hit it on the mark. 

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I'm curious what you mean about on the mark vs al dente--I haven't been to Italy so don't know what the true Italian way is--I cook pasta until there is just the slightest bit of bite to it--what do they do in Italy? Inquiring minds want to know!


Zoe

#25 eyedoc

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 06:49 AM

What a fun day. Everything from the familiar to the exotic. More salumi and cheese and olives than I could imagine. Duck breast from D'Artagnian, Gelati from Ciao Bella, Blue cheese and port, very considerste to put the booths next to each other, peri peri from Africa, even the Harry Potter Jelly beans(my son, " That tasted like fart). The serrano ham was a treat and my favorite was the balsamic tasting. Not often you get to try an 80 year old vinegar. Five hours flew by. A foodie's wet dream.

#26 Gastro888

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 05:38 AM

  The Italian-American companies cooked their pasta past al dente while te European companies hit it on the mark. 

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I'm curious what you mean about on the mark vs al dente--I haven't been to Italy so don't know what the true Italian way is--I cook pasta until there is just the slightest bit of bite to it--what do they do in Italy? Inquiring minds want to know!
Zoe

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Limp, mushy and without a bite. That's what I got when I sampled pasta at the Italian-American booths. The European vendors cooked their pasta in the manner in which you describe.

But when you're hungry...

#27 docsconz

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 07:58 AM

It must be very difficult for the olive oil and olive vendors to stand out. There were so many from so many different parts of the world. The same can be said for chocolate, pasta, cheeses, teas, salts, energy drinks, coffees and so many other food product classes. The amazing thing is that products in these and other classes did stand out. Some stood out amongst others of the same type and some stood out in general.

Posted Image

This was my first visit to a Fancy Food Show, the trade show sponsored by the The National Association for the Specialty Food Trade (NASFT), a not-for-profit business trade association established in 1952 to foster trade, commerce and interest in the specialty food industry. The summer show in New York City, held at the Jacob Javitz Center, sprawls over several levels of this massive complex. Displays are often bunched by nationality or food type, though no real or consistent order is discernible. For example, there were several clusters of Italian or Spanish booths throughout the floor plan. As such, I found it fun simply to wander throughout the aisles and explore. As a person without any specific goals such as tasting olive oils to buy for a specialty store, I was able to not focus on any one thing and get an overall sense of what was available, which was a lot. That being said, of course I still had my personal biases and tended to gravitate towards certain things. Given the overwhelming number of examples available, I tasted very few olive oils and I avoided sweets other than chocolate, fruit and ice creams. Most packaged foods such as jarred pasta sauces, pre-made meals and such I simply walked past. Food items that caught my attention tended to be special and/or unique. I indulged heavily at purveyors like D'Artagnan, where I had the opportunity to meet and talk shop with the lovely Ariane Daguin while enjoying their foie gras mousse , magret and breakfast sausages amongst other delights and Valrhona, where I discovered what for me was the chocolate product of the show – The mint chocolate twigs (Sarments du Médoc line) from the affiliated Mademoiselle de Margaux. This product combined spearmint and dark Valhrona chocolate in such a way that the mint blended perfectly with the chocolate. Neither overshadowed the other, but instead each enhanced the other’s effect without being overly sweet or assertive.

Posted Image

Water – I initially scoffed at the notion of so many different fancy packages of nature’s most basic ingredient, but I very much appreciated the many samples available as they were perfect for quenching thirst and washing down all the flavorsome nibbles. I was also pleased to find my local Saratoga water at the show. Posted ImageIt was interesting to note differences amongst the different samplings, which included in addition to the water from Saratoga, New York, others from Iceland, Wales, Spain, Italy, the Catskills, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, Norway and elsewhere. The biggest differences were to be found amongst the sparklers, for which the fineness of the fizz and the texture of the waters varied considerably. I cannot say that I was able to discern a clear favorite, however. I also scoffed at salt - until I tasted the full line of Halen Mon from Wales. I found their smoked salt particularly intriguing.Posted Image


The international nature of the show was astoundingly clear with representatives from all over the world. Having recently been to South Africa and South America, I was especially interested in their offerings. Pisco Sours made with Pancho Fierro pisco by E. Copello from Peru transported me right back to Cusco. Posted ImageAnother thing I really enjoyed in Peru, but have missed since I have been home are cereals made from quinoa and amaranth. I was quite pleased to find them being promoted at Cusco Andean Products, a booth featuring diverse products from the Cusco area. Africa in general and Southern Africa in particular had a significant presence with products promoting specialties of the area including Cape Malay spice rubs from Cape Town’s Nomu, some magnificent passion fruit juices from SINA Gérard of Rwanda as well as red palm oil by Jungle Products from West Africa and nectars from exotic fruits such as baobab and saba from Mali by way of Mam Cocktail. From the north of Africa, specifically the country of Tunisia, I had a delicious tour through the products of Les Moulins Mahjoub and at another stall, a taste of various products made with Arganza Argan oil.Posted Image


Posted ImageA British Company was marketing Madagascan equitrade chocolate under the Malagasy label. The excellent chocolate could be eaten by all without conscience. Given concerns about overfishing and the apparent unsustainability of some current fishing practices, another fine product that can be enjoyed guiltlessly is Kona Kampachi - open water farmed Kampachi from Hawaii. The sashimi samples offered were pristine and delicious. Perhaps not so guilt free, but equally delicious were cod cheeks and bacalá sampled at Despaña Brand foods.
Posted Image

Speaking of Spanish foods, a subject that I am enchanted by, I was quite disappointed by the lack of product at the Embutidos Fermin booth. I had been looking forward to enjoying their Iberico products as much as anything at the show, only to discover that their ability to export to the American market has for the time being been revoked secondary to FDA inspection concerns. I managed to content myself, however, with some fine 18 month aged Jamon Serrano from Redondo Iglesias. I can only hope that this is but a short term downturn regarding the availability of these wonderful, but expensive Iberico products in the US. Spain was additionally well represented by many olive oils, wines, and other products including the amazing chocolates and candies of the Catalan pastry and chocolate star, Oriol Balaguer, who was there in person. Though this was his first ever visit to NYC, he plans to be back in September for the second Starchefs International Chefs Congress. His booth was a great spot for networking as I also ran into Will Blunt of Starchefs, Michael, Wendy and Max London of Saratoga’s Mrs. London's Patisserie, Shola Olunloyo of Philadelphia Studio Kitchen fame and nearby, the noted Mediterranean food writer, Nancy Harmon Jenkins. Balaguer’s were not the only Catalan delights, though, in the Power-Selles Imports booth. Blanxart chocolate was also represented and other standout products included the sweet Muscat and Pedro Ximenez vinegars of the Alicante based Sotaroni.


Fortunately, in addition to the waters mentioned above, there were many other wet products to sample. Juices, energy drinks and teas seemed to be everywhere. Gojiberry and acai were flavors were prolific, though I found them ultimately uninteresting. I was pleased to find a lightening of sweetness amongst many of the products, especially the prepared teas, of which my favorites remain the various flavors of Ito En and Honest Tea. I particularly enjoyed the new Ito-En line of Dr. Andrew Weil for Tea. Though the name is a bit unwieldy, the products themselves were refreshing and subtle. The turmeric, previously known predominantly as a coloring agent in various curries, was particularly notable as a novel and good tasting product. If it has any of the health benefits claimed for it, so much the better. The tea products that impressed me the most, however, were the loose tea blends of the German company, Dethelefsen & Balk. The perfumes wafting out of the various sample cups were spectacular and varied. The passion-fruit rooibos was one stunner amongst many others in their line.


Plenty of interesting fruit was on display. I had my first opportunity to sample much-heralded Indian mangoes. The mid-season variety I sampled had good, strong mango flavor, but not appreciably superior to some Mexican and Caribbean mangos. A significant improvement though was the lack of fiber to get stuck in between teeth - the one drawback to mango eating in my experience.Posted Image From Chile, I sampled some jarred carica, a member of the papaya family and tasty in its own right. Posted ImageThough not in the fresh fruit category, I enjoyed the newest products from the makers of Cranberry Fool, a product I was initially turned on to by David Rosengarten through his Report. In addition to their established Cranberry Fool and Caramel Sin Products, the small Califonia company now offers a Pear Fool and a Tomato Fool. All of these make great accompaniments to cheese courses.


I probably sampled more cheeses than any other category of food at the show. In addition to the wonderful Parmigianos, Pecorinos and Gorgonzolas there were plenty of other delights. Especially notable from Italy were the cheeses of Latteria Perenzin, particularly their medieval styled “Castel”, their Montasio and the “millefoglie al marzemino.”Posted Image
The bleu cheeses of Rogue Creamery in Oregon are possibly the finest I have had that are made in the US. The cheddars of Cabot and Grafton do Vermont proud and the Vermont Butter and Cheese Company have added a line of small, excellent French style goat cheeses that I was previously unaware of. I had the pleasure of meeting the renowned Paula Lambert of The Mozzarella Company. Her cheeses are as charming as she is and she is quite charming. In addition to a long time favorite of mine, the Hoja Santa Goat Cheese, I particularly enjoyed the Queso Fresco with Chiles and Epazote. Amongst all these wonderful cheeses, though, one stood out as being particularly noteworthy – the Truffle Tremor from Cypress Grove. In addition to meeting Paula Lambert, meeting Mary Keehn was one of the highlights of the show for me. That became even more the case after tasting her newest cheese, one that is not quite on the market. As the name implies, this cheese incorporates truffle flavor into it. The flavor though is subtle and doesn’t overpower the cheese. As with the mint in the Sarments du Medoc mentioned above, it adds a discernible, but harmonious element to the final product. This cheese is simply delicious. It should be released for sale by the end of August.

Meeting legends like Paula Lambert and Mary Keehn was a great aspect of the show, but so was the chance to see old friends like Nancy Harmon Jenkins, Oriol Balaguer and Rick Bayless amongst others.
Posted Image

Certain Japanese products have achieved legendary status in gastronomic circles. Some of these have until recently been necessarily of Japanese origin. That is beginning to change though. One of the more interesting exhibitors at the show was the South Carolina based Real Wasabi LLC, growers and marketers of the flavorful rhizome. It wasn’t long ago that wasabi cultivation started in the US. An article in the most recent edition of The Art of Eating tells that story, however, one thing that article got wrong is that the Pacific Northwest is no longer the only part of the US in which wasabi japonica is grown. The Real Wasabi Co. is growing and selling wasabi from the Great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina.
Posted Image In addition to wasabi, wagyu beef is another legendary Japanese product that is now available outside of Japan. Iowa raised grilled Wagyu beef samples from Imperial Wagyu Beef had that sensational fat-popping quality and deliciousness that has come to be associated with the best Wagyu.


The products I have touched on were only a small part of the show. Undoubtedly I missed much more than I experienced, but there is one more product that I must mention that impressed me tremendously. Posted ImageThe micro herbs and micro vegetables from Koppert Cress USA were some of the most interesting and tasty that I have ever seen and tasted. They are grown and shipped in special palates. Varieties sampled included various cresses and shisos, but the most electrifying taste of the entire show for me was that of the Sechuan Button. Somewhat like the effect of licking a twelve volt battery, but infinitely more delicious. This was the most unique taste that I experienced during the entire show and then some. That taste and the show as a whole left me buzzing.
John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."
- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

#28 gfron1

gfron1
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Posted 13 July 2007 - 08:13 AM

John, thanks for a great report. I usually attend the San Fran show, and then this year the Chicago show (both because they are more aligned with my distribution channels). Having done these for a number of years, I now spend less than a half a day looking at products that really have interest to me - the final entry in your report is the sole product that stood out to me from Chicago - the micro herbs. Knowing that it is unrealistic for me to get them in my store, I was still so impressed with their taste and texture. So many cuinary possibilities exploded in my mind when I tried them and I've continued to think about them for months afterwards. Thanks again.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#29 molto e

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 10:45 AM

Doc,

Next show that you cover, it is time for the Docsconz Podcast!! Thanks for the overview of the event and great pictorial content.

Molto E
Eliot Wexler aka "Molto E"
MoltoE@restaurantnoca.com

#30 rmillman

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Posted 20 July 2007 - 11:43 AM

The products I have touched on were only a small part of the show. Undoubtedly I missed much more than I experienced, but there is one more product that I must mention that impressed me tremendously. The micro herbs and micro vegetables from Cress USA were some of the most interesting and tasty that I have ever seen and tasted. They are grown and shipped in special palates. Varieties sampled included various cresses and shisos, but the most electrifying taste of the entire show for me was that of the Sechuan Button. Somewhat like the effect of licking a twelve volt battery, but infinitely more delicious. This was the most unique taste that I experienced during the entire show and then some. That taste and the show as a whole left me buzzing.

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Based on your comments I spent some time on the internet and found Coosemans Boston, http://www.coosemansboston.com/ , carries both the sechuan buttons and Sakura cress from koppert cress, http://www.koppertcr....php?PageID=508 .
Although this is at the wholesale market area in Chelsea, MA, they sell to walk ins.
Got back a couple of hours ago and must say I cannot wait for this weekend. I have electrified may tastebuds already with a quick mixed sechuan apple sorbet (apple soda, buttons and liquid nitrogen, I work in a biotech company) and cannot wait to try some more things with them.