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Pithiviers


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#61 ludja

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 02:35 PM

And after baking???? (It's so magical how the cuts turn out in the end!)
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

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#62 fooey

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 02:45 PM

I bake it, I'm going to eat it, but I guess I should bake it after I went through all of this.

Preheating oven presently.

UPDATE: No leakage after 20 minutes and it looks beautiful. I just covered with foil so it wouldn't get too brown.

And after baking????  (It's so magical how the cuts turn out in the end!)

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Edited by fooey, 13 December 2007 - 06:02 PM.

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#63 fooey

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 06:15 PM

I'm on a diet, and I cannot be tempted by this delicious pastry in my house.

If anyone is in Seattle and wants it, it's yours, free if you pick it up.

I'm in the U Dist on Roosevelt.

Send me an email before 8pm, Dec 13: (epa300@gmail.com).
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Brünnhilde, so help me, if you don't get out of the oven and empty the dishwasher, you won't be allowed anywhere near the table when we're flambeéing the Cherries Jubilee.

#64 Serj

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 07:18 PM

Congrats... Watching the Pithivier rise evenly and without leakage (the chefs called it "Pithivier TV") for the first time was one of my best moments at culinary school. Luckily it happened on my first exam! =)

#65 fooey

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 08:44 PM

Thanks, Serj.

It's still not perfect by any means; it's not level, for one; but, the rise is at least the 8x height Jacques Torres predicted and it didn't leak (thanks to you all).

It smells so, sooooo good. I just want to stick my entire face in it. :biggrin:

Here's a better photo of the unbaked, frozen Pithiviers:

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Here's a photo to show the width before baking.

That's a US dime for comparison.

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And here it is fully baked.

It's not even, but much better than the first three attempts.

I may be "turning" the puff pastry too many times: 2187 layers (7 turns).

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Congrats... Watching the Pithivier rise evenly and without leakage (the chefs called it "Pithivier TV") for the first time was one of my best moments at culinary school. Luckily it happened on my first exam! =)

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Edited by fooey, 14 December 2007 - 01:41 PM.

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#66 alanamoana

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 11:08 PM

That's a beautiful Pithiviers fooey...but I will offer this:

you can over-fold your puff pastry. this will destroy layers, rather than add more layers, you sort of have to read your dough. you said you did seven turns. it does depend on what kind of turn you're doing (letter=thirds=single turn or book=fourths=double turn). usually, four double turns is sufficient.

also, just noting the sides, while you did get good rise, i remember you saying you used a tart pan to cut the edges. the tart pan probably isn't too sharp (at least not as sharp as a good knife), so you're probably sealing some of the layers together during this process. this will prevent you from getting a nice full and even rise all around.

i would chill very well (partially freeze?) and then use a very sharp knife to cut the fluted edges to make sure to get that nice rise on the edges.

edited to add: another thing i think you did very well was to bake it long enough. i think very few people (americans) would have taken it to the color that you did. it is really important so that all of the dough is baked through and it looks like you did a fine job. covering with foil is a great idea and you can also double pan the pithivier so that you insulate the bottom a bit while it is finishing as well.

Edited by alanamoana, 13 December 2007 - 11:10 PM.


#67 fooey

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 12:05 AM

Thanks, alanamoana.

I'm glad I read the other Pithivier thread, because my first one came out soggy and stretchy, just like they said an underbaked one would. The research I did paid off:

If they're baked a really long time at the proper temperature, they cook through very well, even the bottom. I think your double pan idea is a good one. I haven't checked the bottom yet, so now I'm worried. It might be burnt, considering it was directly on the stone.

Had I not covered with aluminum foil, it would have carbonized after about 35-40 minutes.

As for turns, I use letter turns, 7 of them: so 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 = 2187 layers. Is that too much? If I do 4 doubles, that's only 4 x 4 x 4 x 4 = 256.

Is that right? I think my math is wrong, but 256 sounds like too few.

Your advice about the tart pan is spot on, I think. The tart pan itself has a very thin edge, but it still might not be sharp enough. I will freeze the next one first, and then try the tart pan. I've been cutting it before and, like you say, probably squishing the layers. If it still doesn't level, then the tart pan will become suspect.

Thanks again for the advice. I plan to make these for guests (30 guests) for the holidays, so I'm encouraged to get it right. All of the advice I'm getting is helping a great deal. I'm also learning to make puff pastry like a champ, even if I'm exhausting myself a bit. Making the puff pastry is the hardest part, but it's very rewarding once you can make it like a professional.



That's a beautiful Pithiviers fooey...but I will offer this:

you can over-fold your puff pastry. usually, four double turns is sufficient.

the tart pan probably isn't too sharp (at least not as sharp as a good knife), so you're probably sealing some of the layers together during this process.
i would chill very well (partially freeze?) and then use a very sharp knife to cut the fluted edges to make sure to get that nice rise on the edges.

edited to add: another thing i think you did very well was to bake it long enough.  i think very few people (americans) would have taken it to the color that you did.  it is really important so that all of the dough is baked through and it looks like you did a fine job.  covering with foil is a great idea and you can also double pan the pithivier so that you insulate the bottom a bit while it is finishing as well.

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#68 Tepee

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 12:20 AM

I wish I lived in Seattle. A great attempt! I'm also closely following this very helpful thread. Wish my next pithivier would be as nice as this one.
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#69 fooey

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 12:36 AM

Thanks, Tepee. I'm sure yours will be better, I just hope you don't have to make as many to get there. I will make my fourth tomorrow. When it comes to getting things right, I stop only when my checkbook nears empty. :biggrin:

Please post your questions too so we know what troubles you're having.

I wonder how difficult this is in the Pantheon of pastry. Of all the things I've made over the years, this is proving to be my greatest challenge. The shape is always the biggest challenge, for this, for croissant, and for many breads.

I'm finding YouTube helpful. I didn't even know it was pronounced with 4 syllables...

Pith
-iv(as in give)
-e(as in tree)
-a(as in hay)

...until I saw this video on YouTube: .

It's not the most helpful video if you're trying to make one from scratch, but at least you can hear how it's pronounced.

I was pronoucing it Pith-eve-yair, which is wrong. :blink: :unsure:




I wish I lived in Seattle. A great attempt! I'm also closely following this very helpful thread. Wish my next pithivier would be as nice as this one.

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#70 Tepee

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 01:14 AM

Thanks for the link! I really feel like attacking a piece like they did at the end. For me, the problem is the richness of the pithivier. I can eat half of one. I'll stop when I see the scale going over 2 kgs.
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#71 alanamoana

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 02:04 AM

As for turns, I use letter turns, 7 of them: so 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 = 2187 layers. Is that too much? If I do 4 doubles, that's only 4 x 4 x 4 x 4 = 256.

Is that right? I think my math is wrong, but 256 sounds like too few.

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With regard to the layers...I always have problems with the math but it does depend on how you incorporate the butter block in the first place:

if you just make a square and enclose the butter, you've already got three layers to start. when you fold the dough into your first book fold (you omit counting the layers of dough touching dough because they won't separate when baked) that's already nine layers for your first turn. then do three more double turns:

puts you at over 500 layers

i'll take a look at some of my reference books to see what the average number of turns is/should be.

you can also get a very fair/decent rise using blitz or quick puff pastry. you'd be surprised at how easy it is to use and what a good result you can get with a lot less stress.

but again, i think you're off on a rip roaring adventure! i don't think that the pithivier is so much the challenge as working with puff pastry correctly is the actual challenge. i mean, consider that the pithivier is just good puff pastry with a frangipane filling :blink: ...two components giving one person a run for their money!


edited to add:

"Baking with Julia", Dorie Greenspan - 6 x single turns
"Professional Pastry Chef", Bo Friberg - 4 x double turns
"Perfect Pastry", Nick Malgieri - 6 x single turns OR 4 x double turns
"Professional Baking", Wayne Gisslen - 4 x double turns OR 5 x single turns(if you incorporate your butter in thirds) and 6 x single turns (if you incorporate your butter in a single package)

While doing 7 x single turns might only be one more turn than these books recommend, you might be persuaded that the extra turn can cause unnecessary tearing of the layers during the final turn. Of course, this can depend on the condition of the dough as well. You are also tempting fate by encouraging further gluten development by performing an extra turn. Along with the number of turns, the percentage of fat relative to the dough can affect how well the layers separate. More fat will give you more reliable separation of layers when baked. Less fat can result in "sticky" layers that won't separate because the butter doesn't get rolled out as evenly. So, just more to think about.

Edited by alanamoana, 14 December 2007 - 02:25 AM.


#72 fooey

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 02:51 PM

Thanks, alanamoana, that's very helpful.

I missed the fact that layer + butter packet + layer = 3, so in fact, I was doing:

3 (dough,butter,dough) x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 x 3 = 6561 layers.

Ouch! :laugh: :unsure:

I looked at the Pithiviers this morning, and considering the rise I got (it rose even more after cooling, oddly), I should be satisfied.

I've seen Torres' and Hermé's quick puff, but being the purist I am, refuse to make it until I master the traditional form. Now that you say it's a good solution, I will certainly try it.

Oh, and thanks for all the research on the number of turns. There's obviously a lot of opinion of "right".
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#73 fooey

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 03:11 PM

Anyone have advice on how to get them from my home in Seattle to Alaska?

I fly up next Saturday and will have 3 or 4 of these with me. How do I pack them so they don't fall apart?

I wonder if airport security will even let me through. If they ask for a taste, there's no way I'm getting through, because they'll want to keep all of them for dessert.

:shock: :smile: :biggrin:
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Brünnhilde, so help me, if you don't get out of the oven and empty the dishwasher, you won't be allowed anywhere near the table when we're flambeéing the Cherries Jubilee.

#74 John DePaula

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 09:21 PM

Anyone have advice on how to get them from my home in Seattle to Alaska?

I fly up next Saturday and will have 3 or 4 of these with me. How do I pack them so they don't fall apart?

I wonder if airport security will even let me through. If they ask for a taste, there's no way I'm getting through, because they'll want to keep all of them for dessert.

:shock:  :smile:  :biggrin:

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Torres says that he makes the Pithivier, freezes it solid, throws it into his backpack (still wrapped for the freezer, of course) and cycles off to a party. Once there, he pops it in the oven to cook.

Don't know if this would work for you, though.
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#75 fooey

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 09:47 PM

There are 30 guests, and baking 4 Pithiviers would take 6 hours. :|

Good suggestion, though, thanks.

At this point, I'm thinking to bake them Friday afternoon-evening, and take them with me as a carry on. There's so much that can go wrong with this, so I'm bracing for the worse.

There's always my Bananas Foster backup if they don't make it. :biggrin:

Anyone have advice on how to get them from my home in Seattle to Alaska?

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Torres says that he makes the Pithivier, freezes it solid, throws it into his backpack (still wrapped for the freezer, of course) and cycles off to a party. Once there, he pops it in the oven to cook.

Don't know if this would work for you, though.

View Post


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Brünnhilde, so help me, if you don't get out of the oven and empty the dishwasher, you won't be allowed anywhere near the table when we're flambeéing the Cherries Jubilee.

#76 fooey

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 09:24 PM

There's a topic about Trader Joe's Artisan Puff Pastry** here: http://forums.egulle...howtopic=106587

Since I'm learning to make Pithiviers (and I used all of my homemade puff pastry), I decided to try it.

Verdict: It works in pinch for appetizers (such as those suggested on the box), but if you're making speciality pastries (like Pithiviers), avoid it:

1. The size of the sheets is just too small, limiting your range.

2. There are fork holes in the pastry, which I assume are made to stop shrinkage; but, if you have to flour the surface for rolling, the flour gets into the holes and stays there.

3. The flavour is, for lack of a better term, "off". It's supposed to be all-butter puff pastry and, indeed, that's what it says on the box. It smells like butter too, but the taste is just off. It's a flavour I associate with shortening or oil, but there's no mention of shortening in the ingredients.

INGREDIENTS (as listed on box): Wheat flour, Butter (milk), Salt, Sugar, Water.

4. The puff pastry's "puff performance" is just OK, nothing impressive. As you can see from the images on the box (which are accurate) and the ones I post below, it puffs well enough, but no where near as much as one might expect. It could be the number of pastry "turns" or some other reason, but if you're expecting it to behave like homemade puff pastry with substantial puff, this won't do it for you. Caveat: I rolled the sheets to 12 x 12; had I not rolled the sheets of pastry, it's puff could/may have have been more substantial. When I have more time, I will try making a mini-Pithiviers and NOT roll the dough, just to see if it puffs more.

BUT! IT COSTS $5. I can nit pick it until it melts, but it still costs $5 and takes zero time to make.

Here are some pictures.

You can see the anti-shrinkage holes (and how they picked up the flour) in this photo.

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Rolled out to about 12 x 12.

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** [This is a cross post, but I thought it relevant to this topic. I'm not sure what the policy is on cross posting, so I may have to delete this one.]
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#77 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:29 AM

Yesterday was Epiphany which is celebrated in France with a Galette des Rois, aka Pithiviers. Since we can't easily find it in the US, I learned how to make it a few years ago. I like the recipe from Anne Willan's Country Cooking of France. I use frozen pastry dough and make my own frangipane with freshly ground almonds and a touch of rum (+butter, sugar, eggs, flour). This year I used dark Jamaican rum - now my Pithiviers has two ingredients in common with one of my favorite cocktails, the Mai Tai!

Filling the dough with a thick layer of frangipane
Posted Image

Closing the pastry and glazing with egg wash, scoring in a spiral pattern
Posted Image

Of course at that point I realized that I forgotten (again! I think I do this every year) to add the bean inside, but I added it discretely when it was time to slice it.

Out of the oven (there was also a sugar syrup glaze to make it super shiny)
Posted Image

My daughter got the bean and chose the cat as her king.

Did anybody else have galette for Epiphany? I would love to see photos (homemade or not). There are some pretty amazing creations in French bakeries; I know that they are getting really creative.
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#78 janeer

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 08:39 PM

I made a King's Cake/Pithiviers with Trader Joe's pastry (first time ever not homemade. I felt guilty) to bring to a work breakfast; filled with almond pastry cream from Lenotre. It was pretty damned good, all things considered. Not the same rise as homemade but I did not feel the flavor was "off" as fooey did and the rise was much higher than in photos here. Forgot to take pix.

#79 Franci

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 04:11 PM

Yesterday was Epiphany which is celebrated in France with a Galette des Rois, aka Pithiviers. Since we can't easily find it in the US, I learned how to make it a few years ago. I like the recipe from Anne Willan's Country Cooking of France. I use frozen pastry dough and make my own frangipane with freshly ground almonds and a touch of rum (+butter, sugar, eggs, flour). This year I used dark Jamaican rum - now my Pithiviers has two ingredients in common with one of my favorite cocktails, the Mai Tai!

Filling the dough with a thick layer of frangipane
8355046803_192b838101_z.jpg

Closing the pastry and glazing with egg wash, scoring in a spiral pattern
8355144407_e3f9df31ce_z.jpg

Of course at that point I realized that I forgotten (again! I think I do this every year) to add the bean inside, but I added it discretely when it was time to slice it.

Out of the oven (there was also a sugar syrup glaze to make it super shiny)
8356338538_2f3fe43e6b_z.jpg

My daughter got the bean and chose the cat as her king.

Did anybody else have galette for Epiphany? I would love to see photos (homemade or not). There are some pretty amazing creations in French bakeries; I know that they are getting really creative.

 

Hi FP!

 

I'm here for advice. I need to make some galettes for a class of 27 children this Friday, now I'm kind of regretting it since I have a fever...

I was reading on line and Bouchon bakery book for reference.

David Lebovitz cooks the galete for 30 minutes at 375 F, TK goes for 30 minutes plus 30 minutes after rotating at 350F then lower at 325 and cooks for 50 minutes! Basically 2 hours cooking for only one galette. And I have an ancient gas oven so I cannot put more than 1 galette at the time and basically I have no time to bake in the morning. What a huge difference in time and temperature, I'm undecided.

What to do? Bake at night? It is not ideal right? It would be better to bake in the morning

Other question. David goes only with the almond cream, Keller with a frangipane? Which one?

I'm going to buy frozen puff pastry because I don't have time or energy to make it right now. I see on line Fresh direct puff pastry is 340 grams, Keller calls for 400 g puff pastry for a 9 inch galette. Are two boxes of puff pastry enough for 2 galettes or it's a little tight?

Can I assemble the galettes at night and keep in the fridge and just bake in the morning with no problem? Or just cut the disk and fill, seal and decorate in the morning?

 

In the south of France, where we were living before,  the tradition is the couronne and I'm going to make a couple ready the night before because there are children with nuts allergies and I can omit the nuts. Now I'm trying the no knead brioche from Ideas in food (which I failed once,  just to discover that my house temperature was too high...not a problem this days in NYC) adapted to include orange water and some other small changes...let's see if it works because I don't have a stand mixer yet.

 

I made a King's Cake/Pithiviers with Trader Joe's pastry (first time ever not homemade. I felt guilty) to bring to a work breakfast; filled with almond pastry cream from Lenotre. It was pretty damned good, all things considered. Not the same rise as homemade but I did not feel the flavor was "off" as fooey did and the rise was much higher than in photos here. Forgot to take pix.

 

Good to know because my option for frozen puff pastry are Trader Joe's (not the closest), Whole foods and Fresh direct. Which one?

The average size of a puff pastry box in the US is 12 oz, 340 g?

 

Thanks for any advice on this.



#80 Franci

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 04:18 PM

Ok, forgive me, must be that I'm in bad shape but I didn't realized of the rest of the thread, only read the from Frog Princess on...



#81 pquinene

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:54 AM

Yesterday was Epiphany which is celebrated in France with a Galette des Rois, aka Pithiviers. Since we can't easily find it in the US, I learned how to make it a few years ago. I like the recipe from Anne Willan's Country Cooking of France. I use frozen pastry dough and make my own frangipane with freshly ground almonds and a touch of rum (+butter, sugar, eggs, flour). This year I used dark Jamaican rum - now my Pithiviers has two ingredients in common with one of my favorite cocktails, the Mai Tai!

Filling the dough with a thick layer of frangipane
8355046803_192b838101_z.jpg

Closing the pastry and glazing with egg wash, scoring in a spiral pattern
8355144407_e3f9df31ce_z.jpg

Of course at that point I realized that I forgotten (again! I think I do this every year) to add the bean inside, but I added it discretely when it was time to slice it.

Out of the oven (there was also a sugar syrup glaze to make it super shiny)
8356338538_2f3fe43e6b_z.jpg

My daughter got the bean and chose the cat as her king.

Did anybody else have galette for Epiphany? I would love to see photos (homemade or not). There are some pretty amazing creations in French bakeries; I know that they are getting really creative.

 
Hi FP!
 
I'm here for advice. I need to make some galettes for a class of 27 children this Friday, now I'm kind of regretting it since I have a fever...
I was reading on line and Bouchon bakery book for reference.
David Lebovitz cooks the galete for 30 minutes at 375 F, TK goes for 30 minutes plus 30 minutes after rotating at 350F then lower at 325 and cooks for 50 minutes! Basically 2 hours cooking for only one galette. And I have an ancient gas oven so I cannot put more than 1 galette at the time and basically I have no time to bake in the morning. What a huge difference in time and temperature, I'm undecided.
What to do? Bake at night? It is not ideal right? It would be better to bake in the morning
Other question. David goes only with the almond cream, Keller with a frangipane? Which one?
I'm going to buy frozen puff pastry because I don't have time or energy to make it right now. I see on line Fresh direct puff pastry is 340 grams, Keller calls for 400 g puff pastry for a 9 inch galette. Are two boxes of puff pastry enough for 2 galettes or it's a little tight?
Can I assemble the galettes at night and keep in the fridge and just bake in the morning with no problem? Or just cut the disk and fill, seal and decorate in the morning?
 
In the south of France, where we were living before,  the tradition is the couronne and I'm going to make a couple ready the night before because there are children with nuts allergies and I can omit the nuts. Now I'm trying the no knead brioche from Ideas in food (which I failed once,  just to discover that my house temperature was too high...not a problem this days in NYC) adapted to include orange water and some other small changes...let's see if it works because I don't have a stand mixer yet.
 

I made a King's Cake/Pithiviers with Trader Joe's pastry (first time ever not homemade. I felt guilty) to bring to a work breakfast; filled with almond pastry cream from Lenotre. It was pretty damned good, all things considered. Not the same rise as homemade but I did not feel the flavor was "off" as fooey did and the rise was much higher than in photos here. Forgot to take pix.

 
Good to know because my option for frozen puff pastry are Trader Joe's (not the closest), Whole foods and Fresh direct. Which one?
The average size of a puff pastry box in the US is 12 oz, 340 g?
 
Thanks for any advice on this.

 
 
This is beautiful! I love pithiviers and first made them back in late 1990s. OMG, it was so rich and so delish I just can't get myself to make it again for fear of eating way too much. Thanks for sharing this gorgeous photo!

Edited by heidih, 08 January 2014 - 10:02 AM.
Fix quote tags

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#82 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:55 AM

 Hi FP!
 
I'm here for advice. I need to make some galettes for a class of 27 children this Friday, now I'm kind of regretting it since I have a fever...
I was reading on line and Bouchon bakery book for reference.
David Lebovitz cooks the galete for 30 minutes at 375 F, TK goes for 30 minutes plus 30 minutes after rotating at 350F then lower at 325 and cooks for 50 minutes! Basically 2 hours cooking for only one galette. And I have an ancient gas oven so I cannot put more than 1 galette at the time and basically I have no time to bake in the morning. What a huge difference in time and temperature, I'm undecided.
What to do? Bake at night? It is not ideal right? It would be better to bake in the morning
Other question. David goes only with the almond cream, Keller with a frangipane? Which one?
I'm going to buy frozen puff pastry because I don't have time or energy to make it right now. I see on line Fresh direct puff pastry is 340 grams, Keller calls for 400 g puff pastry for a 9 inch galette. Are two boxes of puff pastry enough for 2 galettes or it's a little tight?
Can I assemble the galettes at night and keep in the fridge and just bake in the morning with no problem? Or just cut the disk and fill, seal and decorate in the morning?

Hi Franci!

If I were you, for simplicity I would bake the galettes the night before, and reheat them in the morning if you get a chance. Galette des rois is better still warm from the oven, but when I lived in France we just bought it from the neighborhood bakery and reheated it before eating it.

Frangipane vs. almond cream - aren't they essentially the same thing?

For me, 1 box of puff pastry is only enough for one galette (I use one sheet for the top, and the other for the bottom). Last year I used a box of Pepperidge Farm puff pastry sheets (~ 500 grams) and the galette yielded about 8 slices, or maybe 10 small slices for kids. For 27 kids I think you will need at least 3 galettes, maybe 4 if you want some for the teacher and for yourself!

Regarding the cooking temperature, I went with Anne Willan's recommendation of 20-25 min at 425F/220C until brown, then 375F/190C for another 15-20 min. Her recipe is available here on google books. That's the one I use every year.

#83 Franci

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 01:55 PM

Thanks, FrogPrincesse. The teacher told me she is going to serve the galette in the afternoon, so I have all the time to bake in the morning.

Did you use the egg wash or water to seal?

I bought 4 puff pastry, so I'm going to bake one tomorrow just to make sure of getting the right cooking time and temperature with my oven. I'll form all the disks tomorrow, make the almond cream and just assemble and bake on Friday morning.

 

I'm also working on my couronne. After the 2nd failed and last attempt with the Ideas on Food people brioche...I'm making Paula Wolfert brioche in the food processor (it's on Egullet) and so far looks really good. It is basically like a no knead but she got it better, I think.


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#84 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 07:52 PM

Thanks, FrogPrincesse. The teacher told me she is going to serve the galette in the afternoon, so I have all the time to bake in the morning.
Did you use the egg wash or water to seal?

Egg wash (the same used to glaze the galette).

#85 Franci

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 07:56 PM

Great! Thanks a lot. I'll let you know how it goes.

#86 Franci

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 12:50 PM

It worked pretty well, this morning has been really easy putting together the galettes, I already cut all the full pastry rounds and I had the idea of spreading the filling in a pasta dish which left the required 1 inch space a the border and the rounder shape at the edges of the filling make it easy to seal the pastry.

Thanks, FrogPrincess! It's going to become my staple recipe, only thing is I don't find the conversions accurate. For me 1 cup of almond flour is about 90 g, I used 120.

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#87 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 12:52 PM

Beautiful! I bet the kids were delighted.



#88 rotuts

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 01:16 PM

Wow Franci.  a bit Wow !



#89 Franci

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 01:35 PM

Yes, the children were very happy, and also their French teacher. 3 galettes (one is missing from the photo) and 2 couronnes for 27 children are all gone!