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bibimbap!

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#61 Jinmyo

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Posted 24 June 2003 - 08:56 AM

I just fire up the flat top (griddle) and put them there. Around 450 F. After twenty minutes I load them. Give them about ten minutes, crack the eggs. No problem.

mamster, perhaps you should try the metal "dolsots"? Or a small sukiyaki pot?
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#62 mamster

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Posted 24 June 2003 - 09:36 AM

Okay, the superhot oven did not help, so I'm going to try the stovetop/flame tamer route. Thanks, Jinmyo. If that doesn't work, I'll get some metal ones.
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#63 reesek

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Posted 14 October 2004 - 01:48 PM

Okay, the superhot oven did not help, so I'm going to try the stovetop/flame tamer route.  Thanks, Jinmyo.  If that doesn't work, I'll get some metal ones.

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*bump*

mamster - what ever happened? has anyone tried this on a "ceramic-topped" electric range? (using quotes, because danged if the thing doesn't look - and shatter like - glass)

what if i got a stone one and put it under the broiler? mmm, dolsot bibimbap. i've been aching to try this. the korean place i go to doesn't do the dolsot version, and i've been willing to let that slide given the divine pancake and tender bulgogi. but i dearly want that crunch.
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#64 mamster

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Posted 14 October 2004 - 07:17 PM

Aha, I did try the stone bowls on the stovetop, and it still didn't work. I am planning to get the metal sukiyaki bowls but haven't gotten around to it.
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#65 torakris

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Posted 19 October 2004 - 09:40 PM

made bibimbap last night! :biggrin:

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#66 torakris

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 07:06 PM

I just can't get enough! :biggrin:
Last night
Posted Image

I marinated the tuna in a Hawaiian poke style (with soy sauce, sesame oil and pine nuts) and also had a vinegared salad of daikon and carrots, bean sprouts seasoned with sesame oil and sesame seeds and chrysanthemum leaves with sesame oil and seeds and a bit of soy. Kochujang in the middle.

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#67 chefzadi

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 07:20 PM

Kris-

What you have there is a combination of hwedupbap and bimbimbap.
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#68 chefzadi

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 07:57 PM

My wife has a question. Bibimbap is one of her favorite dishes. She has been to Korea dozens of times (over 100) several of these trips included culinary tours of South Korea (a treat from her parents). Bibimbap has always been considered a "proper" dish in her mother's kitchen as well, not just hodgepodge of leftovers. She has never, ever seen bibimbap served with kimchi and tofu as part of the mix (in the bowl, to be bimbim) or whatever other leftovers. Not to say these versions can't be tasty enough.

So the question is, Are there (if so where) restaurants serving bimbimbap with tofu, kimchi or what not that's "leftover"?
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#69 torakris

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 10:17 PM

I don't think I have ever thought of bibimbap as a place to use up leftovers.....
I have always made it with freshly made toppings.
I don't really care for kimchi in my bibimbap,though I don't mind eating it along side, but I have seen it served that way here in Japan in numerous restaurants.
Tofu? I have never seen that before, but I could imagine if it was done right it could be good.

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#70 chefzadi

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Posted 06 February 2005 - 09:14 AM

A little bibimbap background information. It originated in the city of jeonju. So if you see a Korean restaurant referring to "jeonju bibimbap" they are making some attempt at replicating the traditional dish which looks like this:

http://www.jeonju.go...eng2004/162.asp

Yes over 30 ingredients! Jeonju is in the Jeolla region, this area (incidentally where my MIL is from) is one of the most fertile areas in Korea. It's their equivilant of the Burgundy and Rhone.

This http://www.clickkore...age=1&menubar=4
is the more common "standard" version. The ingredients I mean, not the presentatton.

And my wife's favorite yukueh bibimbap
http://english.tour2...sm=m5_3&konum=6
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#71 tammylc

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 07:09 PM

Hey there bibimbap fans! I need your advice!

I'm cooking bibimbap for 51 adults and 13 children tomorrow. How much food should I prepare? I cook for this many people on a regular basis, but I'm usually going from a recipe that I can extrapolate serving size from. For this though, I'm on my own.

So far I'm planning 1/4 lb of tofu or beef per person. 1 cup of cooked rice per person, plus some extra. From there, I have no idea.

I'm planning four toppings - cucumbers (salted, rinsed, and dressed with some rice wine vinegar), spinach (wilted and dressed with soy sauce and sesame seeds), carrots (shredded/julienned, blanched, and tossed with a little sesame oil), bean sprouts (blanched and tossed with a little sesame oil). Any thoughts on how much of each I should make? (Or different preparation techniques for the bean sprouts or carrots?)

How many people would a good size cucumber serve? 4? 6? I know I'll need a LOT of raw spinach to get to any reasonable quantity of cooked stuff. I'll be buying 1 lb bags of organic pre-washed baby spinach - how many do you think I should get?

Help! (And thanks.)

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#72 Chris Amirault

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 07:44 PM

You go!

Click here for some very helpful advice from eGulleteers concerning my first full-on attempts at bibimbap.

I'd go for (brace yourself) ten pounds of spinach, about ten medium cucumbers (or thirty kirbys, or five "English" or seedless monsters), about fifty medium carrots, and five pounds of bean sprouts. I'd also add some seaweed, which you'd just have to reconstitute in warm water, and a nice, fat pickled daikon, which you'd just have to julienne.

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#73 tammylc

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Posted 12 August 2005 - 04:45 AM

Thanks, Chris - very helpful suggestions.

The meal went really well. I did most of my shopping at the Korean grocery in town, and that was quite the experience as hardly anything was in English. But I managed to find all of the things that I needed. I stopped at a few other stores to pick up other items.

I'd made a mistake in my original posting - I actually had 41 adults and 13 children, so not quite as many as I thought.

What I ended up using:
10 lbs of rice
~7 lbs of beef (pre-sliced for bulgogi)
4 lbs of tofu
24 Kirby cucumbers (at least, that's my guess - they were labled "pickles" in the Korean market)
10 lbs of carrots
6 1/2 lbs of spinach (would have bought more, but the store only had a few of the large 1-lb packages)
5? lbs of bean sprouts (might have been more - it was six bags - a bunch anyway)
1 pickled daikon radish
6 dozen eggs

I had just about the right amount of everything. There were a lot of carrots left - 5 lbs probably would have been fine, but the single bag just looked so small. There was enough of everything to get people through the first pass through the line (I served it buffet style and let people top their own bowls), and then things slowly disappeared as people came up for seconds.

I used torakris's recipe for the bulgogi marinade for both the beef and the tofu, and it was great. For my tastes, it would be better with a little acidity, so next time I'll add some sake or vinegar or something.

We poached the eggs, which worked well for preparing and holding so many runny yolk eggs.

I'll write in more detail about method and stuff over in my Dinner for 40 thread, but I just wanted to stop in here to say thanks!

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#74 Ninjai Fanatic

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 06:07 AM

I'm a lacto vegetarian - my dad spent many years in Korea as a taekwondo athlete/instructor, and my mom learned how to cook a number of delicious Korean dishes such as bibmpap. The way we do it is just really simple- we saute all of the vegetables with a little bit of sesame oil and/or sesame seeds and or with garlic/chives/leeks- personally, I like it even if the veggies (carrots/cucumber/baby corn-optional/spinach/soy bean sprouts etc) are just steamed and mixed with a little bit of sesame oil.. then we also make this fried tofu dish cooked in that hot-paste that usually comes in red tubs (not so sure about the spelling!) mixed with a little soy sauce, sugar, pepper, and water plus a bit of sesame oil and seeds(optional on the seeds).. we also make the sweetened potato dish/appetizer... :)

#75 skye

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 09:15 PM

the best bibimbap i've ever had was made by a Korean kid at a youth hostel on North Shore Oahu. Simple, simple, simple. I mean, have you ever seen hostel kitchens? And no exotic ingredients. Button mushrooms, bean sprouts, scallions, egg. It's the sesame oil and the red spicy-sweet stuff. Thats the key.
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#76 chantal

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 04:53 PM

Can someone elaborate on the red spicy sweet stuff in red tub? I'd love the name of it or how to make it. Oh and so If I heat my lodge griddle in the oven at 450 for 20 mins then pull it out, heat the electric burner using the griddle as a flame tamer and put my ceramic (spanish terracota) on that, , do you think this will work? Or should I just crank the terracota in the oven, pull it fill it with rice and return to oven for 5-10 minutes. Seems like that might work better. What do you all think? I am guessing I should oil the pot? Or do you want it to stick? I am wondering if I could get the rice crusty using a nonstick skillet and then transfer rice to a hot bowl?

#77 Jinmyo

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 05:55 PM

Can someone elaborate on the red spicy sweet stuff in red tub?  I'd love the name of it or how to make it.  Oh and so If I heat my lodge griddle in the oven at 450 for 20 mins then pull it out, heat the electric burner using the griddle as a flame tamer and put my ceramic (spanish terracota) on that, , do you think this will work?  Or should I just crank the terracota in the oven, pull it fill it with rice and return to oven for 5-10 minutes.  Seems like that might work better.  What do you all think?  I am guessing I should oil the pot?  Or do you want it to stick?    I am wondering if I could get the rice crusty using a nonstick skillet and then transfer rice  to a hot bowl?

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Stuff in red tub: Gojuchang, Korean miso paste with chile.

No oiling, no sticking with stone. Terracotta will stick so you could try rubbing it with a mixture of a neutral oil like grapeseed with a few zots of sesame oil.

Crisping rice seperately then adding it is a foul and evil trick but worth doing.One could crisp rice on a silpat and cut intro triangles that one thrusts here and there into the faux bibimbap. Not that I would, I'm just saying. (A few extra on a plate with a nice shrimp paste dip are also nice. [Not that I would, I'm just saying.])

edit:
"wirth?" What?

"sperately?"

Who was typing this?

Probably that loose squirrel monkey all hopped up on Shangai bok choy again. Bloody menace, she is. Should be a law. Or just give me a taser and I'll shut her down.

Edited by Jinmyo, 18 August 2005 - 05:59 PM.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

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#78 chantal

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 06:12 PM

Can someone elaborate on the red spicy sweet stuff in red tub?  I'd love the name of it or how to make it.  Oh and so If I heat my lodge griddle in the oven at 450 for 20 mins then pull it out, heat the electric burner using the griddle as a flame tamer and put my ceramic (spanish terracota) on that, , do you think this will work?  Or should I just crank the terracota in the oven, pull it fill it with rice and return to oven for 5-10 minutes.  Seems like that might work better.  What do you all think?  I am guessing I should oil the pot?  Or do you want it to stick?    I am wondering if I could get the rice crusty using a nonstick skillet and then transfer rice  to a hot bowl?

View Post


Stuff in red tub: Gojuchang, Korean miso paste with chile.

No oiling, no sticking witrh stone. Terracotta will stick so you could try rubbing it with a mixture of a neutal oil like grapeseed with a few zots of sesame oil.

Crisping rice sperately then adding it is a foul and evil trick but worth doing.One could crisp rice on a silpat and cut intro triangles that one thrusts here and there into the faux bibimbap. Not that I would, I'm just saying. (A few extra on a plate with a nice shrimp paste dip are also nice. [Not that I would, I'm just saying.])

View Post

Hey thanks. I actually wouldn't mind buying stone bowl but I have a tiny kitchen and I am really struggling as it is. I could do it in All-Clad couldn't I? I have a paella like casserole that might work better sice it has sloped sides. Also, how high should I heat the burner to crisp the rice? P.s. I am soooo jealous that you can get Shaoxing.

#79 bottomlesspit

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 11:19 PM

As to the terracotta idea, I'm not sure 5-10 minutes would do the trick or that 450 would do it, either. Your rice might dry out a bit on the top while you're waiting for a sufficient crust to form. To get the degree and type of heat you'd want to make noohreunghi (the toasty rice crust), I'm inclined to say (very preheated) cast iron might do the trick better than terra cotta.

Just an FYI on gochujahng: while it is a bean paste in the sense that it is made with beans, as is miso, I would say it's more of a chili paste, as that's the dominant flavor/usage. The closer Korean condiment to miso is actually something called dwehnjahng, which is closer in both color and flavor to miso.

And while you probably will never see dwehnjahng given as the "sauce" (so to speak) for your bibimbahp in a restaurant, I love to doctor it up and use it instead, or in addition to, gochujahng when I make bibimbahp at home. Minced garlic, chopped green onions, sesame oil, sesame seeds, and just a pinch of sugar to round out the saltiness usually do the trick for me - oh and some chopped jalapeno is nice for added heat.
sg

#80 chantal

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Posted 20 August 2005 - 12:38 PM

As to the terracotta idea, I'm not sure 5-10 minutes would do the trick or that 450 would do it, either.  Your rice might dry out a bit on the top while you're waiting for a sufficient crust to form.  To get the degree and type of heat you'd want to make noohreunghi (the toasty rice crust), I'm inclined to say (very preheated) cast iron might do the trick better than terra cotta.

Just an FYI on gochujahng: while it is a bean paste in the sense that it is made with beans, as is miso, I would say it's more of a chili paste, as that's the dominant flavor/usage. The closer Korean condiment to miso is actually something called dwehnjahng, which is closer in both color and flavor to miso.

And while you probably will never see dwehnjahng given as the "sauce" (so to speak) for your bibimbahp in a restaurant, I love to doctor it up and use it instead, or in addition to, gochujahng when I make bibimbahp at home.  Minced garlic, chopped green onions, sesame oil, sesame seeds, and just a pinch of sugar to round out the saltiness usually do the trick for me - oh and some chopped jalapeno is nice for added heat.

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Wow that was good. Thanks you guys!!! The cast iron suggestion was a good one. Got nice and crispy. Had a Korean roomate a long time ago who used to boil tofu then put a little sauce on it then top with green onions and seseame seeds. Would this little sauce be soy sauce, sesame oil, and chili oil. Does that sound right? Thanks again.

#81 touaregsand

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Posted 21 August 2005 - 06:51 PM

Stuff in red tub: Gojuchang, Korean miso paste with chile.


Really?

the best bibimbap i've ever had was made by a Korean kid at a youth hostel on North Shore Oahu. Simple, simple, simple. I mean, have you ever seen hostel kitchens? And no exotic ingredients. Button mushrooms, bean sprouts, scallions, egg. It's the sesame oil and the red spicy-sweet stuff. Thats the key.


That's not bibimbap, that's bap with stuff mixed in, delicious to be sure, but not bibimbap.

#82 Jason Perlow

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Posted 21 August 2005 - 06:53 PM

As we've discussed before on other threads, Korean Americans in Hawaii have their own evolved Korean food traditions, especially with plate lunches like Bulgogi. It wouldn't suprise me that they have their own version of Bibimbap as well.

Stuff in red tub: Gojuchang, Korean miso paste with chile.


The "miso paste with red chile" is very likely Saemjang, of which there is a lot of variety between brands in terms of actual ingredients used . Gochujang (Wikipedia) as it is commercially sold in Korean supermarkets is mostly red pepper paste (yeah, its got rice powder and a small amount of fermented soybeans as well) which is added to other things to add spice, and there are a number of gochujang-based sauces as well -- a lot of Korean-style steak sauces contain it, as does korean-style "sashimi sauce". Saemjang, on the other hand, is an almost entirely fermented bean condiment that is used on a lot of dishes including bulgogi and kalbi, and again, there are some differences between brands, particularly in how fermented it is or how chunky it is. There are other variations of it, such as cheonggukjang which is even more fermented and is actually used to make a certain type of soup (jigae). My wife and I call it "funky sauce" for lack of a better description, its an acquired taste to be sure.
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#83 touaregsand

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Posted 21 August 2005 - 07:07 PM

Yup, yup, yup.

#84 daniellewiley

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 04:22 AM

Thanks, Chris - very helpful suggestions.

The meal went really well.  I did most of my shopping at the Korean grocery in town, and that was quite the experience as hardly anything was in English.  But I managed to find all of the things that I needed.  I stopped at a few other stores to pick up other items.


Tammy - where is the Korean grocery? And which is your favorite bibimbop place - the one at Kerrytown?
We love Kang's Coffee Break on South U.

Our favorite Japanese restaurant here in Toledo (Kotobuki) is owned by a Korean, and they make an amazing bibimbop. They also have a bunch of other Korean dishes, though they aren't listed anywhere - I think they have them around just for staff meals.
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#85 tammylc

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 05:20 AM

Thanks, Chris - very helpful suggestions.

The meal went really well.  I did most of my shopping at the Korean grocery in town, and that was quite the experience as hardly anything was in English.  But I managed to find all of the things that I needed.  I stopped at a few other stores to pick up other items.


Tammy - where is the Korean grocery? And which is your favorite bibimbop place - the one at Kerrytown?
We love Kang's Coffee Break on South U.

Our favorite Japanese restaurant here in Toledo (Kotobuki) is owned by a Korean, and they make an amazing bibimbop. They also have a bunch of other Korean dishes, though they aren't listed anywhere - I think they have them around just for staff meals.

View Post


Hi Danielle! First things first - have you had your baby yet?

Now that the important questions have been asked...

Manna is the name of the Korean grocery, and it's on Broadway right near where it becomes Plymouth. It's a little tricky to find, especially since they used to be in this little shopping center, but that location closed and they moved right across the street!

I honestly haven't eaten much bibimbop in Ann Arbor other than the stuff at Kosmo in Kerrytown. I've been to Steve's Lunch once I think - not sure if I've been to Kang's (but a couple peopel have mentioned it so clearly I should give it a try).

There's a group in Ann Arbor that's starting a bibimbop tour - they want to try a different place each week until they've had them all. Alas, weekday lunches are more suited to students than working moms.

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#86 daniellewiley

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Posted 25 August 2005 - 04:31 AM

Hi Danielle!  First things first - have you had your baby yet?

Now that the important questions have been asked...

Manna is the name of the Korean grocery, and it's on Broadway right near where it becomes Plymouth.  It's a little tricky to find, especially since they used to be in this little shopping center, but that location closed and they moved right across the street!

I honestly haven't eaten much bibimbop in Ann Arbor other than the stuff at Kosmo in Kerrytown.  I've been to Steve's Lunch once I think - not sure if I've been to Kang's (but a couple peopel have mentioned it so clearly I should give it a try).

There's a group in Ann Arbor that's starting a bibimbop tour - they want to try a different place each week until they've had them all.  Alas, weekday lunches are more suited to students than working moms.

View Post



Yes! He came three weeks early, on August 7 - we are doing great.

I'll have to check out that grocery - I can't wait to move back to Ann Arbor.

I hated Steve's lunch when I went - Kang's is much better - let me know what you think when you make it there.

Edited by daniellewiley, 25 August 2005 - 04:32 AM.

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#87 tino27

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 02:48 PM

I have just recently been turned onto the joy that is Bi Bim Bap and found a local Korean place where I can order it. My dilemma though is that I am having trouble conveying to the chef that I want my egg sunny-side up so that I can break the yolk and mix all of the eggy goodness into the rest of the bowl. No matter what I try (and I've tried three times now), I can't seem to convey my message correctly. 3 times I've ordered it and 3 times the egg comes out completely cooked all the way through. The rest of the dish is fantastic though.

Any thoughts from you fellow Bi Bim Bap lovers out there? :blink:

I must have impressed my server (who I think was the wife of the cook/owner) because at the end of the meal she offered me a glass of soojunggwa (which was quite delicious).
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#88 Kleatius

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Posted 14 April 2008 - 11:34 AM

Hey, a Bimbimbap thread! Nice!

Anyone know anything about the proper way to serve Gojuchang? If you eat it straight from the tub it doesn't have the same taste or consistency as when I've had it at Korean restaurants. I usually try making a sauce with Gojuchang, rice vinegar and sugar and it turns out pretty close to the real deal. Anyone have a proper recipe?

#89 Domestic Goddess

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Posted 14 April 2008 - 05:21 PM

Kleatius - what you're doing is right. Just mix a little rice vinegar, sugar and a little water to thin out the gochujang, put into a ketchup squeeze bottle and you have gochujang that is served in bibimbap restaurants. I'll try to see in my pics if I have a picture of that ketchup squeeze bottle.
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#90 AmritaBala

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 07:13 PM

Have a look at : http://www.maangchi.com

she's a pretty awesome korean cook! She shows you how to make bibimbap, bulgogie, dduk bokkie, and so many other korean dishes. Good luck!





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