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"The Perfect Scoop" by David Lebovitz on ice cream


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#61 John DePaula

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 03:40 PM

OK, now I have a bumper crop of very fragrant (and very tiny) strawberries.

These little guys took forever to pick; they're only about 1/2" in diameter, at best, but especially tasty and aromatic.

Posted Image

So I will try David's Strawberry-Sour Cream Ice Cream (p90). My berries are macerating right now and I'll freeze tonight.

I'll let ya know...

By the way, the Rhubarb Sorbet is especially tasty with the French Vanilla Ice Cream. Sorta like Raspberries and Cream, but with Rhubarb.
John DePaula
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#62 Kerry Beal

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 03:49 PM

OK, now I have a bumper crop of very fragrant (and very tiny) strawberries. 

These little guys took forever to pick; they're only about 1/2" in diameter, at best, but especially tasty and aromatic. 

Posted Image

So I will try David's Strawberry-Sour Cream Ice Cream (p90).  My berries are macerating right now and I'll freeze tonight.

I'll let ya know...

By the way, the Rhubarb Sorbet is especially tasty with the French Vanilla Ice Cream.  Sorta like Raspberries and Cream, but with Rhubarb.

View Post

Those little frais de bois are going to make some fabulous ice cream.

By the way - my copy arrived last week, I have it beside my bed and I'm starting through it. So far the recipes calling out most to me are malted milk and Guinness Milk Chocolate.

#63 John DePaula

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 04:00 PM

OK, now I have a bumper crop of very fragrant (and very tiny) strawberries. 

These little guys took forever to pick; they're only about 1/2" in diameter, at best, but especially tasty and aromatic. 

Posted Image

So I will try David's Strawberry-Sour Cream Ice Cream (p90).  My berries are macerating right now and I'll freeze tonight.

I'll let ya know...

By the way, the Rhubarb Sorbet is especially tasty with the French Vanilla Ice Cream.  Sorta like Raspberries and Cream, but with Rhubarb.

View Post

Those little frais de bois are going to make some fabulous ice cream.

By the way - my copy arrived last week, I have it beside my bed and I'm starting through it. So far the recipes calling out most to me are malted milk and Guinness Milk Chocolate.

View Post

Oh, those do sound good, Kerry. I keep thinking that I'll make this one or that one next but then I see beautiful avocados at the grocery store, or the berries ripen, whatever... it's all good! :biggrin:

Let us know how those two turn out. I think that David says that the malted milk one is his favorite and I really want to try the Guinness one too if I can smuggle some Guinness out of a bar rather than using the dreck that comes out of the cans...
John DePaula
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#64 bloviatrix

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 04:12 PM

I made the strawberry sour cream ice cream. It seems very soft because of all the sugar and the vodka - not firming up. I like the flavor, but I was expecting more of an interplay between the sweet of the fruit and the tart of the sour cream.
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#65 Kerry Beal

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 06:18 PM

Posted Image

Well here is the malted milk ice cream. I didn't add the malted milk balls, since I didn't have any. It is amazingly smooth and creamy. The flavour is excellent.

I'll let you know how it holds up after a night in the freezer.

I have been giving some thought to the Guinness Milk chocolate ice cream and realize that John is right, I have to get Guinness draught rather than the canned stuff. So I'm going to have to do some smuggling myself. I wonder if I know anyone who owns a bar?

#66 weinoo

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 04:55 AM

I have a question - perhaps David can chime in. Has anyone tried making ice cream with Lactaid - or lactose reduced milk? Shirley Corriher, in Cookwise, states that if there is too much lactose in cold ice cream, it will crystallize and cause the ice cream to feel sandy with gritty crystals. Cream, on the other hand, has much more fat and less lactose than milk. So it would seem to me that by using a product like Lactaid, one is much less likely to run into the "gritty" ice cream problem.
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#67 Kerry Beal

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 05:07 AM

I have a question - perhaps David can chime in.  Has anyone tried making ice cream with Lactaid - or lactose reduced milk?  Shirley Corriher, in Cookwise, states that if there is too much lactose in cold ice cream, it will crystallize and cause the ice cream to feel sandy with gritty crystals.  Cream, on the other hand, has much more fat and less lactose than milk.  So it would seem to me that by using a product like Lactaid, one is much less likely to run into the "gritty" ice cream problem.

View Post

That's interesting. I've made ice cream with milk and cream treated with lactaid for lactose intolerent friends but I never noticed any difference in the texture. But then I wasn't really looking. Sounds like a side by side test needs to be done. I'd try it with a recipe that uses a high proportion of milk to cream, because as noted, there is a lot less lactose in cream.

#68 Kerry Beal

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 05:44 AM

Posted Image

Well here is the malted milk ice cream.  I didn't add the malted milk balls, since I didn't have any.  It is amazingly smooth and creamy.  The flavour is excellent. 

I'll let you know how it holds up after a night in the freezer. 

I have been giving some thought to the Guinness Milk chocolate ice cream and realize that John is right, I have to get Guinness draught rather than the canned stuff.  So I'm going to have to do some smuggling myself.  I wonder if I know anyone who owns a bar?

View Post

After a night in the freezer the malted milk ice cream is still gloriously smooth and creamy. Not an ice crystal in sight.

My hubby gives it 2 thumbs up, noting only that it is a bit sweet - I felt that was the case too. Now I know that I need a certain amount of sugar for texture, but I think I'll try replacing part of the sugar with some glucose and see what comes of it.

I made only half a recipe and plugged it in to mastercook as 6 servings. Works out to about 9 weight watcher points per serving, so I figure I sampled about 5 points last night while making it. I'm going to have to be careful with this cookbook's experiments! Perhaps I'd better get myself into the sorbets.

#69 weinoo

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 06:08 AM

I made only half a recipe and plugged it in to mastercook as 6 servings.  Works out to about 9 weight watcher points per serving, so I figure I sampled about 5 points last night while making it.  I'm going to have to be careful with this cookbook's experiments!  Perhaps I'd better get myself into the sorbets.

View Post


That would be great, but I end up eating twice as much sorbet as ice cream!! :shock:
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#70 John DePaula

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 01:57 PM

I tried the Strawberry-Sour Cream Ice Cream last night. Very tasty. No problems with it firming up, though I do agree I'd like a little more tart action going on there. Maybe different brands of sour cream yield different results?
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#71 gfron1

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 02:12 PM

I wonder if you could use quark or one of the Middle Eastern thick yogurts to get a tart-er taste.

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#72 John DePaula

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 02:14 PM

I wonder if you could use quark or one of the Middle Eastern thick yogurts to get a tart-er taste.

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That's a great idea. I will give that a try... that is, once my stock of ice cream dwindles down a bit! :huh:
John DePaula
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#73 Kerry Beal

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 04:42 PM

Just made the mango sorbet. I had an overripe mango on the counter, I pureed it with a little less than the called for sugar, the water, a bit of key lime juice (I have some in the freezer, but no regular limes in the house) and a couple of capfuls of dark rum.

Lovely! A bit of extra bite from the key lime juice and the rum adds a wonderful depth to the flavour.

#74 McAuliflower

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 11:52 AM

I made the Vanilla Frozen Yogurt a few days ago, and am really enjoying it. The drained yogurt adds a bit of tang and a wonderful, rich texture.

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I just made up a half sized batch of the Frozen Yogurt using David's recipe as a guide. The recipe is found on 101 Cookbooks.

I used Greek Yogurt (the full fatty one with cream and whole milk), added a vanilla bean and instead of using granulated sugar I used sugar syrup left over from making candied orange peel.

The yogurt mixed up wonderfully and tastes fantastic. However, the texture after an over night stay in the freezer is not so great. Now its crumbly and icy. Even with letting it soften up at room temperature, it seems to go straight from icy crumble to liquid- no smooth creamy mouthfeel stage unless its melting.

Did my use of sugar syrup cause this?

It strikes me as a problem in the microstructure- like the ratio of air/ice crystals/fat is off. Or a problem in emulsifying?

:unsure: At least it tastes great
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#75 tejon

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 03:12 PM

I had the same problem after storing the frozen yogurt. I used full fat yogurt and the amount of sugar recommended, too. Still delicious, but not smooth.
Kathy

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#76 alanamoana

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 06:49 PM

even with full fat yogurt, i drain the yogurt for a few hours to overnight through cheesecloth to get rid of excess moisture. i think this might be your problem.

you can always use middle eastern yogurt called: kefir or labne...this is tangy, delicious and already drained. sort of like an extra thick sour cream, but with cultures. delicious!

#77 McAuliflower

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 07:21 PM

even with full fat yogurt, i drain the yogurt for a few hours to overnight through cheesecloth to get rid of excess moisture.  i think this might be your problem.

you can always use middle eastern yogurt called: kefir or labne...this is tangy, delicious and already drained.  sort of like an extra thick sour cream, but with cultures.  delicious!

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Was wondering about draining. The recipe implies that draining wasn't required if using the Greek style yogurt. But draining makes sense- I likely have an excess of ice?
:checking previous posting: tejon drained her yogurt and had the same issue.

Huh- freezing kefir... We have alot of Kefir in town. Though I don't think its the same as what you are talking about. Ours is produced by Nancys yogurt and is a runny drinkable yogurt. But very tangy. Definitely not drained tho. Likely a name bastardization by the Nancy's people?

thanks!
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#78 tejon

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Posted 03 June 2007 - 09:25 PM

Yep - I used Mountain brand full fat yogurt, drained overnight. The texture was the same as labne by the time I ended up stirring in the sugar and vanilla.
Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

#79 lisa_antonia

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 01:02 PM

Apricot
<img src="http://www.andrew.cm...s/apricot.jpg">
Roasted Banana
<img src="http://www.andrew.cm.../bananaic.jpg">
Honey Lavender
<img src="http://www.andrew.cm.../honeylav.jpg">
Panforte, Green Tea, Lemon-Specaloos, Turron.
<img src="http://www.andrew.cm...s/tartufi.jpg">

<img src="http://www.andrew.cm.../tartufi1.jpg">

#80 John DePaula

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 01:46 PM

Apricot
<img src="http://www.andrew.cm...s/apricot.jpg">
Roasted Banana
<img src="http://www.andrew.cm.../bananaic.jpg">
Honey Lavender
<img src="http://www.andrew.cm.../honeylav.jpg">
Panforte, Green Tea, Lemon-Specaloos, Turron.
<img src="http://www.andrew.cm...s/tartufi.jpg">

<img src="http://www.andrew.cm.../tartufi1.jpg">

View Post

Wow, Lisa, that all looks wonderful! Someone has been busy! Great pix.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#81 AnnaC

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 03:50 PM

I made the Salted Butter Caramel this past weekend; when I discovered that somehow only fine sea salt was in my boyfriend's cabinets, I used Kathy's suggestion on modifying for that and it worked perfectly. Suffice it to say that there is no more.
Which means that it's time for more ice cream this weekend! I was planning on trying David's recipe including the cookie-dough mix-ins (as a favor to someone whose absolute favorite treat is DQ's cookie-dough blizzard) but left the book at home like a big dummy. Called around to the local B&Ns, Sur La Tables, locally-owned places and NOTHING!
Which means it's the frozen yogurt for us unless anybody has more search tips. Any more ideas on preserving the texture after freezing overnight? I'll be using whole-fat Greek yogurt, drained.

#82 BeeZee

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 01:20 PM

Search tip: check your local public library. I often check out cookbooks to decide if I want to purchase them. This one's a keeper.
"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

#83 juliachildish

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 08:30 PM

Speaking of the library, that's where I just got my copy! Although I'm sure, after looking through it, that it's going on my birthday list. So many exciting flavors, and I love the mix-in suggestions and recipes, because I am a big big fan of chunky ice cream.

So far I have tried the strawberry sour cream and the milk chocolate. I very much liked the strawberry sour cream, and found that it actually firmed up really fast. I don't usually even like strawberry ice cream, but this one really tasted like strawberries. I didn't think it was extremely sour, but it was enough to cut the sweetness. And I think the brand of sour cream I used-organic, without any thickeners-was particularly sour, so that may have helped.

I added brownie (the chewy brownies from the back) and cocoa nibs to the milk chocolate ice cream. I think the brownies do, as promised, keep their chewiness and flavor in the ice cream, which was a pleasant surprise. However, two cups might have been a little too much for some people-I sort of taste the brownie more than the ice cream. It is a nice background for the brownie though! And the cocoa nibs were a welcome crunch. I did have a little trouble getting this one to firm up-but I think that might have been because I have a cheapo Donvier ice cream machine, the kind where you freeze the canister, and I only let it freeze for six hours in between the strawberry and milk chocolate ice creams.

#84 John DePaula

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 10:26 PM

Well I knew I had to do something about the ever increasing variety of containers in my freezer. Since today was Sunday, I thought why not have an old-fashioned Ice Cream Sundae Social. I served the following:

Ice Creams & Sorbets
Roasted Banana Ice Cream
French Vanilla Ice Cream
Strawberry-Sour Cream Ice Cream (made with home grown Fraise des bois berries)
Chocolate Coconut Sorbet

Toppings
Classic Hot Fudge (made with Valrhona Guanaja – simply wonderful)
Candied Sour Cherries
Fresh Fraise des bois berries (tiny wild strawberries from my garden)
Ripe Bananas
Toasted Almond Slivers (slivered almonds with Kirschwasser and a little sugar, toasted)
Whipped Cream
70% Dark Chocolate Chips

What a wonderful evening; we were all kids again enjoying our hot fudge sundaes!

(One nice thing about this type of party: you can do everything ahead of time and just enjoy your guests when they arrive.)
John DePaula
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#85 emmalish

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Posted 11 June 2007 - 10:02 AM

Well I knew I had to do something about the ever increasing variety of containers in my freezer.  Since today was Sunday, I thought why not have an old-fashioned Ice Cream Sundae Social

View Post

Clever! I'm dying to try a new recipe, but I've still got three containers in the freezer. There IS a limit to how much ice cream a single woman needs in her freezer at any given time.

This brings up something I've been wondering about anyway – how long do homemade ice creams keep fresh?

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?


#86 John DePaula

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Posted 12 June 2007 - 11:17 AM

Well I knew I had to do something about the ever increasing variety of containers in my freezer.  Since today was Sunday, I thought why not have an old-fashioned Ice Cream Sundae Social

View Post

Clever! I'm dying to try a new recipe, but I've still got three containers in the freezer. There IS a limit to how much ice cream a single woman needs in her freezer at any given time.

This brings up something I've been wondering about anyway – how long do homemade ice creams keep fresh?

View Post

That’s a good question and I’m not exactly sure of the right answer. I think that because these recipes don’t use any stabilizers, they’re meant to be eaten fairly quickly. Surely they’ll last several weeks; however, the texture may degrade over time becoming more grainy.

Loved that scene in the Albert Brooks / Debbie Reynolds movie Mother when she offers her son some ice cream and he complains that it has gone bad. No it’s still good under the protective covering of ice, she replies. Too funny!
John DePaula
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#87 alanamoana

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Posted 12 June 2007 - 02:26 PM

homemade ice cream is meant to be eaten within a couple of days. you can increase the shelf life by placing plastic wrap directly on the surface of the ice cream to prevent ice crystals from forming...but as john says, the texture does degrade after a while.

#88 David J.

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 08:25 PM

I made the Gianduja Stracciatella Gelato and served it in a bowl made from David's Ice Cream Cone recipie.

Posted Image

I used some of my bulk Callubeut dark chocolate for the stracciatella to ensure it was top quality.

The cone batter was pretty thick and not that easy to spread into an even circle on the baking paper, but it was managable. Not owning a cone form I pressed the circles over an upturned bowl. This proves that you don't require a press to make cones or bowls on your own.

It all worked out rather well and my wife pronouced the gelato superb.

#89 ejw50

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 08:01 PM

just got my copy can't wait to try some out. Love the pics on this thread.

#90 foodie52

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 08:23 PM

Just got back from his class. It was lots of fun. Here are some photos. David made:Parsley icecream. Chouquettes. Chocolate mocha sorbet in tuille.
He also made a fabulous olive oil icecream with a chocolate souffle cake and a cranberry orange chutney.
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